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Guns in schools.

sport school shooting national curriculum

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Poll: Shooting as sport in UK schools. (73 member(s) have cast votes)

Should shooting be part of the UK national curriculum?.

  1. Yes. (45 votes [61.64%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 61.64%

  2. Voted No. (28 votes [38.36%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 38.36%

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#1 Yosemite Sam

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 10:10 PM

Since shooting is a legitimate sporting activity in the UK, I believe it should be taught in schools from a young age alongside rugby, javelin and football etc.

What do you people think?.

Cheers.

Sam.

#2 HDAV

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 10:13 PM

Shooting is taught in plenty of schools, even some state ones...... Adding it to the national curriculum is unlikely but it's a perfect all inclusive sport the fat kids, lazy kids, ugly kids, all kids start on a level playing feild with shooting, except perhaps the blind ones.

#3 cant hit rabbits 123

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 10:19 PM

You'd be lucky to even have it discussed at most schools.

#4 Rupert

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 10:23 PM

Who by? teachers,they have no authority or power to exert real control over the kids as it is,now put guns in kids hands.It will never happen.
It the role of clubs to teach shooting.

#5 HDAV

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 10:30 PM

Who by? teachers,they have no authority or power to exert real control over the kids as it is,now put guns in kids hands.It will never happen.
It the role of clubs to teach shooting.

Oddjob does a pretty good job! Admitly it's mostly private schools as an extra ciriculer activity or Scouts/ccf/cadets but it does happen.....

#6 Pole Star

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 10:43 PM

I called to the Oxford Gun co shop & shooting school not to many years ago only to see lots of uniformed children from the Bloxham school turn up for a lesson in clay shooting & those kidds were loving it ! , I remarked to Shirley & Doug Florent " Cor I wish I had gone to that school ! " .
Any way when I was about 14 or 15 I took my unlicensed 12 bore double side lock to school to make a new stock for it in wood work with the teachers appoval ! that was about 1973 or 74 , could you imagine that happening today !! :hmm:

Think it would depend on the type of school as we only have to see what has happened with growing violence in schools in the inner city areas .

Edited by Pole Star, 16 August 2012 - 10:59 PM.


#7 bedwards1966

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 10:54 PM

Yes, it would be a very good thing (I know which sport I'd have opted for!). Apart from allowing children to potentially find something they like, it would give them the chance to see them in another way from the films and video games angle, which for most is their only source of gun information.

Yes, there can be no doubt that it would be a very good thing. Not like it'll ever happen though.

#8 Yosemite Sam

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 11:56 PM

Shooting is taught in plenty of schools, even some state ones...... Adding it to the national curriculum is unlikely but it's a perfect all inclusive sport the fat kids, lazy kids, ugly kids, all kids start on a level playing feild with shooting, except perhaps the blind ones.

Agreed and lol :) .. I doubt it either.
 

You'd be lucky to even have it discussed at most schools.

lol . I wouldn't even try .. AR would be enroute before seat was warm.
 

Who by? teachers,they have no authority or power to exert real control over the kids as it is,now put guns in kids hands.It will never happen.
It the role of clubs to teach shooting.

I didn't mean hand 12g to toddlers but see what you mean as parents neither have control of their kids these days.

I called to the Oxford Gun co shop & shooting school not to many years ago only to see lots of uniformed children from the Bloxham school turn up for a lesson in clay shooting & those kidds were loving it ! , I remarked to Shirley & Doug Florent " Cor I wish I had gone to that school ! " .
Any way when I was about 14 or 15 I took my unlicensed 12 bore double side lock to school to make a new stock for it in wood work with the teachers appoval ! that was about 1973 or 74 , could you imagine that happening today !!

Think it would depend on the type of school as we only have to see what has happened with growing violence in schools in the inner city areas .

Fully agree .. for obvious reasons "special" schools could not be included . If a pupil couldn't be trusted with safety scissors to not raze the building etc.
<HTML><META HTTP-EQUIV="content-type" CONTENT="text/html;charset=utf-8">
<P>

<BR>Yes, it
would be a very good thing (I know which sport I'd have opted for!). Apart from
allowing children to potentially find something they like, it would give them
the chance to see them in another way from the films and video games angle,
which for most is their only source of gun information.<BR><BR>Yes, there can be
no doubt that it would be a very good thing. Not like it'll ever happen
though.<BR>

</P>

<P> </P>
<P>I don't think it will happen either, at least, given how our past and present
governments work.</P>
<P> </P>
<P>It's a pity really, I would have prefered it to cricket .. (not dissin'
cricket by the way :) ).</P>

#9 markm

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 12:17 AM

We have a ccf in our school (I'm a teacher). The students involved use .22 at the local range, they have been to camp clay pigeon shooting and also have SL80's for drill and 'imaginative combat' (im unsure as to the technical term.) I have had my .22 and .243 in school to show them a comparison to sporting rifles which the held but did not fire. I would love to take groups to the local clay ground for introduction lessons but the cost is way out of their (students) league.

Edited by markm, 17 August 2012 - 12:18 AM.


#10 clakk

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 06:29 AM

we had it at my comprehensive in the 80s martini henry .22s and 1 stonking anshutz target rifle donated by a happy ex member every friday the careers teacher an ex RAF drill walla taught it even a couple of the girls joined far better than social studies the fat lame n lazy did .all for it started shooting in the army cadets age 13 ,lee enfield .303s everyone should be allowed to learn at an early age how to safely use them and they can make their own mind up to carry on or not .

#11 NickS

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 06:35 AM

I voted No as the original poll question is about whether it should be part of the National Curriculum i.e. it becomes compulsory. As a teacher, I have the view that there is enough prescription anyhow. Interestingly, the NC does not apply to independent schools which is where almost all school shooting exists, usually under the wing of the CCF.

I now teach in the state sector and have asked if I can take some groups clay shooting. There was no problem getting agreement but cost is a real issue with most shooting grounds. I did get a lot of support from one guy who used Army land but his shoot folded when he lost the lease and I have not been able to find anywhere close by willing to offer "at cost" shooting to a group of novices including qualified instruction and gun loan. It is a big ask for many kids to be paying &pound;30/40 plus transport to often remote spots and many grounds are only open on a Sunday morning, meaning staffing can be an issue. The other issue is the numbers involved - my school has 1400 students so you either regard it as an elite activity (select by ability to pay?) or it becomes a logistical nightmare.

So, whilst I agree that it would be nice, schools do not have the budgets or facilities to make it available to all. This makes it all the more important for each of us to do whatever we can to encourage and promote the sport in any way we can, no matter how small.

Nick

#12 e2000e2000e

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 07:15 AM

I also would vote no, it would be impractical and expensive to have it taught in schools! Could there be Shooting clubs open to school children, ofcourse, even run by the school as extra-cirruclar! Lots of the Olympic sports arn't taught in schools even if they are legal and legitmate as shooting is! I finish high school just over ten years ago the only sports we did were football, rugby, hockey, tennis, badmington and basketball and maybe athletics for about 2 weeks every summer, oh and by athletics I mean long jump! There are many sports that are only available as extra-cirricular or outside clubs its not as if shooting is exclude and everything else is fine some things are too expensive or need more space than the schools have available. It's up to us to teach the young-uns, my oldest nephew just turned 9, .410 just gone on shopping list!

#13 Paul223

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 07:28 AM

I voted No as the original poll question is about whether it should be part of the National Curriculum i.e. it becomes compulsory. As a teacher, I have the view that there is enough prescription anyhow. Interestingly, the NC does not apply to independent schools which is where almost all school shooting exists, usually under the wing of the CCF.

I now teach in the state sector and have asked if I can take some groups clay shooting. There was no problem getting agreement but cost is a real issue with most shooting grounds. I did get a lot of support from one guy who used Army land but his shoot folded when he lost the lease and I have not been able to find anywhere close by willing to offer "at cost" shooting to a group of novices including qualified instruction and gun loan. It is a big ask for many kids to be paying £30/40 plus transport to often remote spots and many grounds are only open on a Sunday morning, meaning staffing can be an issue. The other issue is the numbers involved - my school has 1400 students so you either regard it as an elite activity (select by ability to pay?) or it becomes a logistical nightmare.

So, whilst I agree that it would be nice, schools do not have the budgets or facilities to make it available to all. This makes it all the more important for each of us to do whatever we can to encourage and promote the sport in any way we can, no matter how small.

Nick

IMHO this is where the shooting orgs should step up to the mark and help with cost free instruction, and at a age when the kids are less likely to have been brain washed by anti gun / shooting / field sports, I would not mind paying extra in my subs to help fund such a thing

#14 OddJob

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 07:28 AM

I agree with nicks that there is plenty enough for schools to have to fit in to an already crammed NC. Also I don't think it should be pushed on anyone as that breeds contempt and poor behaviour, neither of which you want when working with guns.
As a separate PE club is where it's place can be. It is hard to organise and expensive and so, if there is a real legacy movement, sponsorship and support from shootingGB and others will need to come. I've been blessed with huge donations allowing training to cost 12 per session once a month, vital to access as many socio economic backgrounds of a state school.
Coaches have given time for free, another reason it could never be in mainstream school due to staff ratios.

Edited by OddJob, 17 August 2012 - 07:29 AM.


#15 HDAV

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 08:16 AM

Fully agree .. for obvious reasons "special" schools could not be included . If a pupil couldn't be trusted with safety scissors to not raze the building etc.


A couple of years ago i was chatting to a clay coach, who had taken groups from a local school (independent IIRC), the group he was given was the "naughty" group who he had great success with capturing their imagination, showing them the need to respect the what they were doing and the consequences of misbehaving. My school was good for sport and had great facilities, but a large number of sports were either optional or extra curricular. The school had a .22 range no longer used, and had Laser clays at the summer fete most years.

#16 NickS

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 08:46 AM

Actually, I think it would work well with a lot of the naughties. There will be some you can never trust but most would see it as an incentive to behave if they knew the alternative was that they would not be allowed to do it.


Nick

#17 HDAV

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 08:56 AM

Actually, I think it would work well with a lot of the naughties. There will be some you can never trust but most would see it as an incentive to behave if they knew the alternative was that they would not be allowed to do it.


Nick


Yep, I think it could work as a real carrot, there are some that you can't but that is the same as the wider population. Shame there isnt anywhere nearby you can use Nick (have you tried contacting the CPSA etc or local MOD sites)

#18 Vince Green

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 08:56 AM

Shooting at school was a big one years ago, most decent schools had a CCF and a range. You need only to go to bisley every year to the schools meeting to see its still alive but the schools are all public schools and that tells you something.

#19 Cranfield

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 09:04 AM

I voted "No" as part of the National Curriculum, but would vote "Yes" as an optional extra Curriculum subject (like CCF).

#20 Chr15j

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 09:10 AM

I vote yes
Ignorance breeds contempt

If people understood shooting they would no longer perceive guns as toys (as an aside I hate toy guns they encourage the wrong attitude, I.e. Shooting something has no consequence).
Knowledge brings understanding which will facilitate a more mature approach to guns, and a better understanding will reduce this mob rule knee jerk reaction when something dies go wrong.
We all know knives are sharp and dangerous but that they are tools not toys and we are educated in school that knives are not toys etc, hey presto despite high knife crime, there are no antis and no knee jerk mo e rule ban knife reactions.





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