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Clay shooting on private land


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#1 jonnyoftheboy

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 06:11 PM

Guys

I am sure this has been asked before, but looking for pointers.

If you were to buy a plot of land - few acres - what restrictions are there on being able to shoot on it. I am thinking of clays here rather than any live quarry (whether it makes any difference).

Can you just turn up, on your land, & set up some traps & shoot? Not that simple is it?

I am sure you may get complaints re. noise etc unless you are lucky enough to be pretty remote & away from residential. But is there anything stopping you planning wise? does the land need to come with shooting rights attached.... or is that just for live quarry?

can anyone point me in the right direction? give any informal advice? point me to any links on the net to read up?

any help appreciated.

#2 Magus69

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 06:40 PM

Depends on what the question really is.
Are you planning on yourself and a couple of mates just setting up a few traps and shooting on an occasional and informal basis?.
Or are you thinking of setting up a commercial type shoot where people come and pay and shoot the same land on a regular basis?.
The former is easy just go ahead and do it,but obviously with due care.
The latter can be a right minefield of rules and regs.
Sorry I can't help you with the latter I did look into it once but gave it up as a bad idea when I found out about the pollution aspect and the area I would eventually have to de-lead and what that sort of operation would cost.
Mike...

#3 jonnyoftheboy

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 07:37 PM

Hi Mike

qu. was 2 fold really.

1. yes, just looking for myself & mates really.... not a commercial shoot. shooting once or twice a week with a few manual/auto traps for fun/practice.

2. I am sure every shooter has looked into setting up his own shoot/ground. yes, I am in that place at present.... but am starting to think that where you would like the land... it is too exp. & too nr. residential so sound pollution issues. Also, having looked at it.... I think it is quite difficult to make it pay.

any thoughts you have (maybe by pm) of when you looked into would be interesting....

but yes, I think qu. 1 is the more realistic....

so no planning needed for 1? what I mean is, if you picked up a few acres of arable land.... & you set up in the middle of it.... so enough space for shot to fall harmlessly, etc..... there is no restriction/ land does not need a specific use?

#4 Catamong

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 07:51 PM

You will need Planning Permission to shoot more than 28 days a year.

The best way to go about getting a small clay shoot is to find a farm miles from civilisation, with an old chalk quarry or dell hole you can shoot in that will screen the noise.

Try it out and see if you get any complaints, if not, shoot for a bit longer or more often, then see what happens.

Cat.

#5 jonnyoftheboy

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 09:24 PM

cheers Cat

#6 Baldrick

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 10:10 PM

what I mean is, if you picked up a few acres of arable land.... & you set up in the middle of it.... so enough space for shot to fall harmlessly, etc..... there is no restriction/ land does not need a specific use?


If you were to go through with this on a few acres of arable land surrounded by cropped land, bear in mind the risks of lead contamination. You do not want to be saddled with a claim from the neighbouring farmer for a (pea or potato) crop rejected due to lead contamination. We lost 43 acres of vining peas last year due to lead contamination.

Do also bear in mind land prices: good Grade 2/3 land in East Anglia is trading at about £6,100/acre. And that's if you can find any.

I would follow Cat's lead and find a disused quarry.

#7 POW!

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 01:08 AM

I have my own clay syndicate here , we rotate between the farms , The regulations to go comercial are a mine field ,

BUT , You can get a LOT of clay shooting for a little money by just visiting your local shooting school;s or charity shoots held all over the place ,

Yes its nice to have your own , to invite those YOU choose to shoot with , , If you have the sort of money that I belive you would need , Go ahead !! ,

As you grow older your interests change , so care needs to be taken , in what could be an expensive whim , [ DONT ASK HOW I KNOW ] !!

The advice all ready given needs to be mulled over , The quarry is a great idea , I have been looking a lifetime for the right one , as yet no luck . at my price range , 4x4 will oput bidyou !! .

Good luck . visit more clay grounds , your pound will go a long way , but most of all keep asking questions , and ENJOY!! , POW!

#8 john_r

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 08:06 AM

Regards lead pollution to crops, do you have to use non-lead shot if trying to protect peas and potatoes? Not something I have ever heard about but being new I don't assume anything.

#9 jonnyoftheboy

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 08:17 AM

Pow.... Baldrick...

many thanks for the input.

POW.... yeah, some good points there....thanks

#10 Baldrick

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 08:19 AM

John, there's nothing in law that says you have to use non-lead for shooting over cropped land. Lead contamination isn't a problem on cereals or sugar beet. We had the pea crop rejected following weeks of constant, daily pigeon shooting by the local Guns. The pellets were visible to the naked eye. It caught us unaware to an extent.

Pigeons don't feed on potato plants, so whilst a potato crop is highly sensitive to contamination, you wouldn't be shooting over it.

#11 john_r

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 09:47 AM

Thanks Baldrick, I guess once an opportunity arises I would simply check into what is the right way to go. Rabbits will eat potato plants though but I am hoping to hunt those with my air rifles.




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