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chrisjpainter

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Everything posted by chrisjpainter

  1. Well, maybe, but this moth ain't the evidence of it I agree, those subtle colour variations are exquisite
  2. I trust your opinion. You're the only one on this forum who's been hunting in Jurassic Park, so you must know your stuff
  3. Even the BBC can't take that one seriously. Of all the photos they could have gone for, they went for this!
  4. I suspect, whilst you are of course right, you might have wasted your breath! The OP hasn't been back on the site since joining and asking his question, so I think we might be chasing after the wind posting anything more to help the chap!
  5. That was a funny kind of wedding! Great stuff as ever.
  6. CJ Ujah: British Olympic 4x100m relay silver medallist's 'B' sample positive - BBC Sport So that stat about Team GB being the only team to at least equal or better a medal haul in the next two Olympics after hosting's gone up in smoke. You have to feel for the other three runners. This'll taint the whole Olympics for them.
  7. Leave them behind for a day. That'll get it to turn up!
  8. chrisjpainter

    F1

    It's a plague on both their houses. What I would say is Hamilton's properly lucky. The incident was no worse in cause than his stunt that ended Verstappen's race a couple of races ago. Hamilton got a 10 second penalty which had absolutely no bearing on the race as he came back and won it anyway. A 10 second penalty and a 25 point swing in his favour is a good day at the office. What happened yesterday was made more consequentially significant because of the sausage strips at Monza that gave the Red Bull just enough air needed to be propelled up into the air and onto Hamilton. At almost any other track that wouldn't have happened. Given that they were both at least partially at fault, hammering Verstappen so badly when Hamilton got off so lightly the previous time is pretty unbalanced.
  9. One day, one of your trips is going to go from this... To this... Great stuff as ever. I guess there's plenty more to come. Until you get eaten
  10. @JDog's copy is the photoguide, I have the illustrated guide (which is better is a war we can have elsewhere!), but both are much better than the RSPB ones. Here's a page from the illustrated one, with the sparrowhawk and goshawk page, two species where size is critical, but it also gives a quick silhouette comparison between kestrel and sparrowhawk, which shows how easy it can be to split species using silhouette alone
  11. Learning silhouettes is a great way to start. Colours can lie, but the shape of a bird rarely does. Most of the common species of raptor can be separated by the outline alone. If you get yourself a good birdbook (I vote Collins guides, NOT RSPB ones!) you'll be able to see drawings of the birds in flight and at rest. Pay attention to wing width, shape and pointiness at the ends. Size is harder, because there can be crossover and can be hard to judge, but if you're able to compare it to an imagined bird, even if you can't see it in the flesh, you can get an idea of the raptor's size. i.e. bigger than a crow? MUCH bigger than a crow? etc. Then it's just a matter of patience, experience and looking something up. When you see something, don't think 'what's that?' Think. 'right it's got this, this and this, but not that'. commit that to memory, so you can look it up later. You'll get there. There aren't that many to worry about and the vast majority of them will be one of only a single hand of species!
  12. I doubt anyone at Nike has sobered up yet. They must be beside themselves with glee at having her as a sponsored athlete.
  13. She's 18 years old - there's not been time for the usual circus! She's also a bit of an odd story. She turned pro in 2018, but drifted along picking up experience in the ITF tournaments - two layers below the main draw WTA tournaments, where professionals go who aren't up to the main draw standards. Then Covid hit and she played no competitive tennis for a year. Even when the WTA kicked off again, it was months before ITF stuff started. In June 2021 she got a wildcard entry to WTA event in Nottingham and lost in the first round. So far, so unnecessary of hype. Then came Wimbledon - again on the wildcard because she didn't qualify - and started beating people with a lot of experience and some pedigree and it was only then that the media took interest in her. She still wasn't expected to do anything at the US - so much so that she'd booked flights for after qualifying, not the main draw. Then she started thrashing everyone who had the misfortune to share a court with her! This is why the wildcard system is such a useful tool for domestic players of international tournaments; they get a taste of the big time that they might otherwise never get. And once in a while it kickstarts a player from obscurity into the limelight and changes the trajectory of a career.
  14. No, I think that stays as is as far as I can tell, which seems odd as I can imagine there's a healthy percentage of the caravan owners who are in that group as well as in the farming community
  15. That was extraordinary. 10 matches in a row without dropping a set! Fabulous
  16. Now it's getting tense. Won the first set, but a break down in the second...
  17. Ah thanks for that, I think I misinterpreted this line in the guidance 'DVLA will update your driving licence record to show that you’re allowed to tow trailers. You’ll get category BE added to your driving licence when you get a new photocard driving licence. You do not need to contact DVLA for this to happen. It will be done automatically.'
  18. Yes we found that out last night. I don't agree with it, if I'm honest, but I'm happy to benefit! Having to print out millions of new licences for all us post 1997 drivers is gonna vex the DVLA, and anything that vexes the DVLA is fine by me; they're so difficult to deal with
  19. Some idea of what 'cheapish' would be useful? £300? £400? £500+?
  20. Is that really easier than looking at the end of a cylinder? It might cost less, but it's not easier!
  21. It depends what it's being used for. If plinking or target shooting then perhaps. But if hunting and you only shoot a handful of shots a session, then even with an Ultra you could have three or four outings without needing to fill up. No point filling up if you know you don't need to.
  22. Here is the above section: 'Fox 13.25 Although not set out in legislation, common rifle cartridges considered suitable for the shooting of foxes range from .17 Remington, and .22 Hornet to .22 -250 and .220 Swift, though there is a wide range of suitable similar calibres commercially available. In windy areas, where heavier bullets aid accurate shooting, or if applicants wish to use one rifle for shooting both deer and foxes, they may choose a rifle in 6mm (.243/.244) or 6.5mm (.264) calibre. .22 Rimfires are generally considered as having insufficient muzzle energy to be used against foxes in most circumstances. However, these could be suitable for use at short range by experienced persons, and may be permitted in certain situations such as around farm buildings or paddocks. It is for the operator to ensure that the quarry species are shot at the appropriate range with the appropriate ammunition to achieve a humane kill. Combination shotgun/rifles should have the rifled barrel in a similar calibre. Expanding ammunition should be authorised for shooting foxes. Those involved in shooting foxes will normally be authorised to possess up to 250 rounds, but consideration should be given to each shooter’s individual circumstances, particularly where re-loaders are acquiring missiles. See also paragraph 13.9 on allowing the applicant flexibility to reasonably shoot other species on named land. In short, as others have said, no, you can't and you shouldn't be trying to. Whilst it is obviously allowed to kill foxes as @WalkedUp (and I do have concerns with the 1996 Countryside Act's wording on this!) points out, animals are protected from inhumane treatment even if there is legal intention to kill. All this information is freely and easily available. Can I ask where you were looking? Some forums are better than others, but as you're looking for a legal answer it's best to look at the law, not what the nation's hunting keyboard warriors are saying! Realistically you have two options: get someone in to get rid of them, or as @Chaz25rather sensibly, just secure the perimeter. You're sure it's foxes, not cats, right? Where are you in the country?
  23. Bach. Euch. If it ain't baroque, don't fix it. Give me Beethoven any day of the week
  24. No, for me Shakespeare still sets the mark. He moved language and theatre on far more than any of our modern contemporaries have done. The debate over whether he wrote them will never be settled, but there are no more credible possibilities than Will. Bacon, Oxford, several men not one, whomever you pick there are massive flaws in the theories. There are too many stylistic difficulties to make someone of high court feasible. The vast majority of Shakespeare's plays all have an elemental feel of the maverick (the controversial (to the time) politics, the treatment of religion, the complete dereliction of the unities etc) about them that point to someone educated but not of the establishment. And there's no coherent logic behind saying it could have been more than one. Stylistically, the plays fit too well and the ones where we know there's collaboration immediately stick out in the text and subtext of the narratives. A single author whose works and style matured over time makes more sense I think he'd have agreed with you, to be honest. I love Shakespeare and hoovered it up at school and uni, but there's an absurd reverence about his work that actively harms enjoyment of it. I've seen the best Shakespearian actors of our day do his stuff, but none beats a production of Twelfth Night done by a local to Reading professional drama house I saw. It was bawdy, irreverent, chaotic and absolutely brilliant - and probably closer to what to what it would have been like in the 17th Century than any RSC production given to an audience drunk on its own self importance.
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