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JohnfromUK

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Everything posted by JohnfromUK

  1. Sensible post. I use 1 oz (28g) on live quarry and 3/4 oz (21g) on clays.
  2. I have a huge old brass WW1(?) shell case and they stand up in that, but the little copper water pipe covers are cheap, easy and work well and also keep the oily brush away from other cleaner bits.
  3. That is all I do; made them from copper water pipe offcuts - with a penny soldered in as an end cap. Seems to do the job for me. The brush shown is probably 20 years old, used weekly (but it is a top quality Payne Gallwey pattern). When fully pushed in - the whole bristles are enclosed.
  4. For anyone who has VERY deep pockets, these are rather nice https://www.timhardy.com/Shotgun_Combination_Cleaning_Kit--product--54.html For brushes going flat on one side - try one of these - made of copper water pipe.
  5. JohnfromUK

    Geronimo.

    If so to have two false positives, from different samples taken some months apart is really almost impossibly unlikely.
  6. If you TELL the French anything - they pretend they don't understand. It is (in my past experience before retirement) near enough impossible to negotiate with the French. They pretend they don't understand anything they don't like, talk for ages only to revert to the opening position in the closing sentence, and don't follow the agreement afterwards anyway if it doesn't suit them. Example (EU not specifically French) - the AZ vaccines delivery schedule - sign up, later find what they have signed up to doesn't suit them, try and claim the law is wrong - and finally try and falsely rubbish the product as a revenge action. Utterly despicable.
  7. Like request the French (and other EU states) follow the (The EUs own) Dublin Regulation?
  8. the EEC has a pile of rules (as you would expect) on asylum : https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/common-european-asylum-system_en One, the Dublin Regulation states "To avoid abuses, European law, the Dublin Regulation, requires that asylum seekers have their asylum claim registered in the first country they arrive in,[6] and that the decision of the first EU country they apply in, is the final decision in all EU countries." Details here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asylum_shopping The UK left the Dublin Regulation with leaving the EEC on 31/12/20. IF the Dublin regulation was actually applied - the problem would largely go away because few come directly into the UK other than via another EEC country. However - like so many EU rules - it is treated as 'voluntary' by some member states.
  9. Short answer - Yes they are. Slightly longer answer. Some EU countries follow rules, but many - and France in particular have only ever followed what suits them. It has always been the case.
  10. Because they are told (by various including various 'celebrities', lawyers, and of course the smugglers who make BIG money) - that they are welcomed with free accommodation, weekly money, free health care, free legal assistance to get asylum, free and good education for their kids ........ etc. Some of it is even true. It is the painted as the "Promised Land" - which it probably is compared to a stinking refugee camp near Calais where the French make sure they know they are unwelcome there and cannot stay. In which case we would blatantly be breaking International Maritime Law. Just as with the EEC - we may grumble about soft laws, Human Rights etc, but we do observe them ......... unlike many other nations. IF other nations were honest and law abiding - the asylum seekers would be given asylum in the first country in which they set foot - which is rarely the UK.
  11. And a good lady from some maritime agency (possibly HM Coastguard?) today on the radio says that you cannot send back a vessel 'at risk' - and it only needs one person on that vessel to threaten to jump overboard - and it is 'at risk'. Apparently the smugger ring organisers arrange to ensure that every vessel has an appropriate 'risk' ready to deploy.
  12. JohnfromUK

    Geronimo.

    It looks (from the BBC report) the final 'growth cultures' from the postmortem will take a while. It is certainly eating plenty of man hours (and so money). Agreed
  13. JohnfromUK

    Geronimo.

    Forgetting the post mortem where there seem to be mixed up reports -two completely separate tests, both positive - and she knew the animal was clear? How does she 'know' - does she have divine insight? I''m sure it's what she wanted of course - but how can she know both tests were wrong? There is another report here https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-58490510
  14. JohnfromUK

    Geronimo.

    That's our wonderful press for you! I have no idea which is right either, but two tests (some time apart I believe) both positive seems a good starting point for a positive at postmortem. I'm sure DEFRA didn't want the initial tests to be positive - they had nothing to gain - and a whole lot of aggravation to face, but the tests are what they are.
  15. JohnfromUK

    Geronimo.

    This is what I read https://www.gloucestershirelive.co.uk/news/gloucester-news/geronimo-alpaca-not-bovine-tuberculosis-5888262
  16. JohnfromUK

    Geronimo.

    Not according to the (local) paper in Gloucestershire today; "Today, Defra officials confirmed that early results show the animal did have signs of TB." The owner has disputed this, but DEFRA stated; "Defra has rejected this assertion and stated that experienced veterinary pathologists completed the initial postmortem examination and found a number of "TB-like lesions".
  17. If it is the same West Mercia FEO I had a chat with a couple of years ago, he is a very pleasant, sensible level headed chap - and I suspect very good at his job. He had the ability to chat to people (well me anyway) in a friendly way, put people at ease and quickly establish a rapport.
  18. JohnfromUK

    Big Ben

    I'm also happy to pay my £1.20 - but I would have been much happier had I been asked for £1.20 initially rather than told I pay £0.40 then be charged £1.20. It is not the amount that is the concern - it is the fact that either there was gross incompetence in surveying/specifying/scoping/pricing/quoting the work - or someone was deliberately misleading. I don't like paying for incompetence and I hate paying to be mislead.
  19. JohnfromUK

    Big Ben

    You may well be right - in which case - who is misleading who (I'm not quite sure how the responsibilities are organised, but this is a sort of guess)? The 'clerks of the works' dept misleading the Parliamentary Estate finance dept? The Parliamentary Estate finance dept. misleading the Treasury civil servants? The various civil servants misleading MPs Parliament? MPs misleading people, press etc? The bottom line is that refurbishing old buildings does tend to run over a bit - which is why you have contingencies - which might typically be 5 to 15% in construction. I presume more in refurbishment. But 29M jumping to 80M simply isn't 'contingency'.
  20. JohnfromUK

    Big Ben

    And this is the key issue; The quote was NOT a quote for the work carried out. I don't know what the £21M was for - and what additional work and changes to the original work package were to add £59M, but they must have been considerable. With your own home (and mine was very similar in changes to spec and consequent costs) it is entirely your choice as to how much variation in work and change in price you are prepared to accept. However, it is not a satisfactory way of spending either public funds or someone else's money.
  21. It is very sad to loose someone. My condolences to his family and friends. I didn't know him, but all the comments on here paint a picture of a person with a wealth of knowledge which he gladly shared through this forum, and no doubt other channels. It highlights how as we all get older it is so important to share and pass on knowledge and experience where possible. Reading this thread shows how Hawkeye set and example for us all to follow in that respect.
  22. It looks identical to an AyA case I have that was (I'm told by ASI) made here in the UK for AyA (or ASI). My case is about the same date (mid 1980s) as Buze's gun.
  23. I am guessing that your (your wife's) Churchill will in fact be Birmingham made for Churchill (an expert could tell you who made it, but companies such as AA Brown and others made for the big names). As such it comes from a trade that knew the quality boxlock better than anywhere for a great many years.
  24. It looks lovely (they both do). Well done.
  25. Key here is to decide what basic size/type you want and by that I mean; Small/compact pair - easy to carry with you, cheaper for same 'quality level', can be excellent when light is good, but less good in poor light/twilight, and have slightly less 'field of view'. Typically 8x20 to 10x25. Good choice of makes/models and both new and second hand. Medium/general purpose - fair to carry but do weigh a lot more than compact, good in most light levels and even fair at lower light levels, good field of view. Typically 8x32, 8x40/42, 10x40/42. Wide range of choice and prices, Good choice of makes/models and both new and second hand. Large/low light - big and heavy and expensive for better grades (big glass is harder to make accurately). Best in low light/twilight/difficult conditions. A pain to carry a long way and all day. Best grades very expensive, cheap large ones tend to have some performance limitations (big lenses difficult). Typically 8x50, 10x50, 12x50, 10x56 etc. Limited choice and harder to find second hand Another key point is compatibility with glasses if you/the user is a glasses wearer. The 'eye relief' is the important parameter here and eye relief below about 15 to 18mm will make use with glasses a possible problem. Personal choice is a compact 8x20 because I don't often need low light capability and the compactness/low weight makes it SO much easier to carry/have with you. I made the mistake about 20 years ago of buying an expensive big set of 10x50s and rarely use them as they are so cumbersome/tedious to carry.
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