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neutron619

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  1. Sold, pending the usual. Buyer pulled out - so price drop to £300! 🙂 (Mods: for some reason, the new price set on GunWatch isn't copying through here...)
  2. You lot should look up a company called ITM Power and see what they're doing. They seem to have a lot of very interesting answers to many of the problems you're discussing above.
  3. Haven't updated this in ages, but some data: http://www.smallboreshotguns.com/410-bore/410-cartridges/
  4. I don't suppose some smart **** at BASC could apply for one for BASC members at cost £110 between all of us...? Still - would save on the £110/hr travel costs if we just said "England".
  5. And even if they weren't, having a single operator for a particular geographic area (rather than forcing operators to compete by selling "slots" for particular routes, creating competition) creates a natural monopoly where they can charge what they like. What we need is three or four operators competing on the major routes - ticket prices would soon fall (as would driver salaries and perks, if that sort of thing bothers you).
  6. Thanks for all the replies. I'll be making some calls when I get back from being out tomorrow.
  7. No - I haven't heard of him - could you PM contact details?
  8. Looking at Maxam powders mostly, but now Lovex also since their data indicates a good "A1 substitute" in (I think) S030. I've been using Vectan powders in the past, but its rather more expensive now...
  9. For anyone reloading in / around Cambridgeshire: I'm looking to buy a couple of tubs of powder but the local shops have nothing useful and the hazmat delivery charges from the online suppliers really sting when I'm not placing a huge order. Is anyone interested in joining forces to make an order from Clay & Game or FES (or someone else and splitting the cost of delivery)? Obviously we'd have to find a way to make sure everyone's interests were protected, but it can't be too hard to come up with a scheme to make sure that happens. Reply or PM me if you're interested.
  10. And yet it was the traditional pigeon load for many, many years. I'd argue, in fact, that it still is - although of course, not many folk use it given modern, StupidFast™ cartridges kick rather harder than the old ones did. Funny that. A cynic might suggest that they'd worked out that making sensible cartridges too uncomfortable to shoot would shrink the market at that end and let them charge a higher price for "speedier", somewhat under-loaded replacement brands, whilst saving ¼ of the price of the lead. Of course, I don't know any cynics, so it's hard to form a judgement... PS - A look at one of the old Eley diarys would probably be informative. Anything pre-1995 would probably be about right.
  11. Not a bad idea, except that you may find that reloaded cases - new or old - end up being even "fatter" than factory-loaded cases: the problem may get worse rather than better.
  12. Shot a couple of decent pigeons over the weekend with the Eley VIP 21g/#7. I've used that cartridge in a #6 as well and found them both good to about 35 yards - pattern gets a bit sparse with the #6 beyond that. I've also liked the Hull High Pheasant 23g cartridge though I can't remember whether that was a #6 or #7. Both nice to shoot though.
  13. Yep - look at the difference in the beaks. Long, pointy and greyish plus blue-tinged feathers is a rook. Short, stubby and black is a carrion crow.
  14. The only one I ever did was a muntjac with a 28 gauge shotgun round to the back of the skull - so not even a rifle. I admit I was slightly concerned about wandering around on the verge of an A road with a shotgun, but I called the police, told them what I intended and they asked me whether I could take the animal away to save them sending an officer to check the road was clear! Not a problem, as you can imagine. The woman who had bounced it off her car was understandably a bit hysterical having basically snapped the poor thing in half - the front end was moving and the back end, not so much. She calmed down a bit once I'd killed it, but I'm glad I was there since she showed no sign of having any clue what to do. I defy anyone to tell me I was in the wrong, using what I had with me. The only bit I found slightly sad about it was that before it was hit, I'd seen it in the distance, charging across the bottom of the field I was walking that morning and thought to myself "magnificent!", only to hear the inevitable bang of bonnet-meets-deer a twenty seconds later. **** happens, I guess.
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