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Mochastorm

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Everything posted by Mochastorm

  1. In answer to the original question. It is because lost property has nothing to do with the Police.
  2. Another vote for the Aigle Parcours ISO. I wear them for shooting, ferreting, beating, dog training, following hounds and lamping. My wife wears Le Chameau, they look good with her jeans when she’s on the school run in the rain.
  3. Everthing seems to differ from force to force. If you contact your F.E.O. by phone or email they will provide you with the information you require.
  4. Westley you must recall on the first night in ‘81 being given a piece of flimsy clear plastic with a small piece cut out for the front of your custodian helmet, and elastic to hold it in place. They called it a visor. Static shield lines while wearing long Henley raincoats over a tunic. We were fully equipped. As you said, happy days.
  5. It appears to be the older type used by the Mounted Sections. Some Forces experimented with different equipment after the riots of 1981 and all manner of batons could be found in equipment stores. If the strap is leather look carefully and you may see the remains of a handwritten collar number on the inside. I also recall that the R.U.C. carried something similar for public order situations many years ago.
  6. In response to the original post, I would not advocate whacking it with a stick, or threatening to shoot it. It is your friend’s dog, if you were to go with either of those options you may lose a friendship.
  7. Terriers are still dogs and can be taught obedience, but it’s not your dog, so not for you to train. If the owner isn’t bothered by its behaviour then there is little you can do other than show your displeasure that his mutt is jumping uninvited into your car. I personally wouldn’t give the dog the opportunity to jump in my car, it is simply self rewarding bad behaviour. In the same way you can’t tell another person’s child off, you can’t discipline somebody else’s dog.
  8. A national licensing authority would be the way forward. Everything standardised and the authority could approach the relevant Police Forces and if necessary G.P. Surgeries for any relevant information held. I’m sure Chief Constables would be happy to hand the task to another body. They would of course still be able to block the issue of a certificate for those not suitable, in the same way they do now. I’m sure though the cost would be greater than the current price of an FAC/SGC.
  9. The Chief Constable of your area is responsible for issuing your FAC/SGC as I understand it, so there could potentially be over 40 different issuing authorities. Each one can interpret the guidelines, or ignore them if they wish. I think the future is going to be that some form of a medical report will be required if you want to hold an SGC. Feel free to appeal it to a court. In the current climate I believe that a judge would rule in favour of a medical report. Home Office guidelines, which are just guidance and not legally binding, are likely to include this in the future. It is another hurdle to cross, but I’m prepared to do it to renew my SGC.
  10. A bad dog is not better than no dog. It is a liability that you don’t need on a shoot where firearms are involved. I’ve seen walking guns with their dogs attached to their belt by a lead, being dragged all over the place by a big strong Labrador. This at the same time they are carrying a loaded gun while others are around them. Dogs that flush game so far ahead that it can’t be shot, or keep coursing it making a shot impossible. Dogs on big commercial shoots that ruined a whole drive by running in and clearing a wood of birds. Bad dogs are a real nuisance. Just aim to train the dog before it goes near a shoot, everyone is so much happier and safer.
  11. What you’ve described when he’s in company with others is a nightmare dog. The other guns, if they haven’t said it already, must be very annoyed. However you say you can stop the dog on the whistle. If you can stop him then that’s what you need to do. Just mean business with him, and don’t tolerate anything other than perfection. He doesn’t move unless you tell him. Leave him at home for the remainder of the season and enjoy your shooting because at present the dog is being rewarded for bad behaviour. He has a day on the shoot and does as he pleases. Work on his steadiness, the summer months are ideal for training with longer daylight. Consider gundog lessons where you can group train, this may be invaluable in your case. When you have him steady take him back to the shoot and leave the gun at home, concentrate on him to get him close to what you and others think is acceptable. When you have reached this stage start shooting over him again. If he behaves you can relax and enjoy your shooting in the knowledge that your four legged mate isn’t going to spoil the day. Best of luck.
  12. You say that he works fine on his own describing your shoot as walked up. Does he hunt just in front of you within shooting range, does he stop on shot or whistle, does he mark birds and only retrieve on command. Can he be handled to an area and take hand signals. If he can do this then you may have a chance as the only thing you have to train is working him with other people/dogs present. However I suspect that these things probably aren’t in place and to start breaking bad habits, and train a six year old dog to an acceptable level may be too much. This could be a good time to look for a challenge, something about 8 weeks old and a blank canvas to convert into the perfect shooting dog for your needs.
  13. I know this doesn’t assist but you will have signed a consent form that outlines risks with surgery, and that risk increases the older a dog gets. Have you been offered any sort of explanation as to the cause of death?
  14. Have the dogs done some retrieving? I would have thought that a keeper’s dog, even if only ever kept in the beating line would have done its fair share of retrieves. If that natural ability is there then all that you need is good control. If you pick up at the end of a drive and have to send into cover just try to keep them in sight, at least they can’t flush birds from an area that has been beaten through. The house training principles are the same as for puppies, but may take a bit longer. What can go wrong? Well a few little things maybe, but no disasters. I can see the potential for plenty of fun and rewarding too. Go for it and enjoy.
  15. I don’t understand all of the hype. There are far more dangerous drugs being prescribed in vast quantities every day. As has been said, if it works then use it. If it helps kids with severe epilepsy, give it. If an MS sufferer has some respite from their pain, give it. This is medicinal cannabis. If you want something stronger then contact your local drug dealer. If it helps the sick and those in pain then they should have access to it.
  16. Oh how times have changed, not one suggestion for waxed cotton. Guaranteed to make you wet from the inside out. I still have the ultimate, a Barbour Northumbria in my loft, one day I may slim down so it fits again. My favourite coat for when the weather gets nasty is a Harkila Pro Hunter, which is waterproof and warm. They aren’t cheap, but certainly worth the extra money.
  17. I can’t see any reason to escalate or involve shooting organisations. The keeper has asked for something, which he was wrong to do. His actions have caused the shoot to lose a drive with the added complication that he now potentially loses birds off his ground. He’s lost, you won, keep it civilised there may come a day when you may need the help of your neighbour.
  18. I understand your position, not enough hours in the day. I don’t know where or who you will use for training, but I assume as you are no beginner you will have a few sessions with dog and trainer while it’s away. I agree that you have to take this dog if it’s available now. Awkward time, season starting, shorter days and longer working hours. Hope all goes well and good luck with your new team member.
  19. The legislation is there. It is the decision of the Chief Constable. If it suits you get a solicitor, engage BASC or other organisation, appeal it to the courts. Personally I would just be a reasonable person, and if asked answer the question honestly. After that just wait for the SGC to drop through the letterbox.
  20. The bond with a dog can be hard to define. There are many who have their dogs in the house, take them to work and are with them 24 hours a day. The dog will be referred to as their best mate. They have a bond. There are those who keep them in a kennel and have about an hour in total together every day. They have a bond. My own observations are that the kennelled dogs are often more easily trained. I wouldn’t confuse supposed strength of the bond with tractability. If you are intent on sending away for training I wouldn’t worry too much about the bonding issue, but when you get the trained dog back home you will have to stay on top of the training. You’ve trained two dogs previously, would it not be possible to train this one yourself.
  21. Mochastorm

    Modern life.

    Just read through the posts, and agree with most. Have I officially turned into my Dad?
  22. I think many of us forget as priorities for Chief Constables and Crime Commisioners our certificate applicatIons are right down the list. It’s not going to get better, and will probably get worse. Even a massive cash injection into Policing, which isn’t going to happen, wouldn’t change things. The system does need changing, but we have to work with what we have at the moment. My own opinion is that no news in this case, is good news.
  23. Have you checked with Truckman for a replacement, and more importantly your car insurance. I had similar issue a few years ago with a Land Rover Discovery, the insurance company sorted everything as I had the glass cover. I was directed to the local Autoglass where I paid £40 excess and no penalties for a claim.
  24. Well I’ve just read through 7diaw’s post and I shall PM him in the future with any dermatological issues I may have, forget the dogs. This is an in depth and scientific response with excellent advice. If you arm yourself with this information when you visit the vet I’m sure you will get a successful outcome.
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