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grrclark

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About grrclark

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  • Birthday 06/06/1972

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    Fife, Scotland

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  1. grrclark

    14 million in poverty

    Insect derived protein based food, bulked up with GM staples such as rice, pulses, root veg and the like. Yep, it’s not too far over the horizon.
  2. grrclark

    14 million in poverty

    At some point it all has to rebalance. Also 7bn people and growing living on this wee ball will precipitate change all by itself, regardless of what the politics are. Within our lifetime it is not unreasonable to expect to have to pay £50 - £100 for a beef burger. Scary that!
  3. grrclark

    14 million in poverty

    Nah, they wont, why would they. 1.3bn is an awful lot of people to share the dosh around when millions can share the spoils between them. There is no nationalistic altruism. China have at least 10 fully built cities that could accommodate 1 million people, yet they still live in huts because they can’t afford the escalating property prices of the empty city appartments. It is utterly utterly nuts. Beyond that there is at least 1 city I know of in Africa, built by Chinese state wealth that is also completely empty, but with a neighbouring shanty town of an equal population to the number of empty appartments. China loves capitalism and all that it can bring in power and wealth. Just about as coherent in parts as a pub discussion just before closing time too 🙃
  4. grrclark

    14 million in poverty

    I agree the US is as much a regime as China or Russia, just not quite such an autocratic one although they have taken a step closer. Likewise the UK is a regime and right now I wish it was autocratic as we are damn near impotent in being able to make meaningful change. So long as we have partisan politics driven by soundbites and emotive rhetoric we will never be able to address the big issues of the day. The stupid thing about debt is that whilst it is used as a measure to suit some agendas, it is pretty meaningless when you can game the system to suit and capitalism is flourishing because it allows people to game the system and that is human nature.
  5. grrclark

    14 million in poverty

    We live in a time of less war than ever before, although as we are much more aware of what’s going on around the world we don’t think so. What China and Russia highlight very well is the virtue of an authoritarian and autocratic regimes, taken from a very particular viewpoint of course. Communism has collapsed all around the globe, not at the hand of the imperialistic demon US, but because of the fundamentals of human nature, mainly greed. Capitalism flourishes because of the very same thing. In both systems some people rise to the top and enjoy what that brings without consideration of those at the bottom. Really not so different at all because people are not so different.
  6. grrclark

    14 million in poverty

    Yep, the “voluntary re-education camps” surrounded with double perimeter walls and rolls of barbed wire. The quoted phrase is exactly how they were described by the Chinese government. Hamster, on many of your points in this thread I support you, but using China as an exemplar of sound social policy you’re on your own, likewise with Russia.
  7. grrclark

    14 million in poverty

    China, good job, really? An authoritarian regime with an appaling record on human rights and a hideously oppressive social management approach. Do just a little bit of reading into how China is managing its Uighurs muslim population and come back and tell me they are doing a damn good job.
  8. grrclark

    14 million in poverty

    We are not so far apart in our thinking on this. Social conditioning plays a massive part in the problem.
  9. grrclark

    14 million in poverty

    To examine Germany you need to examine all of the EU, or more pertinetly the Euro zone economies. There are a great many economic problems throughout much of Europe that could be very reasonably be argued are due to the disproportionate strength of German capitalism.
  10. grrclark

    canabis oil

    We are at cross purposes. I agree there are a great many positive outcomes from using cannabinoids medicinally or therapeutically, especially in terms of pain relief or alleviating symptoms associated with chronic conditions like MS and epiliepsy, etc, it is the volume of other magical cures associated with the drug that alarms me and those are fuelled by the same sort of sources as advocate anti-vax, that is what I was poking at. There are also significant benefits in the reduction of side effects compared to synthesised analgesics, etc and that is hugely valuable to the quality of life through palliative care, as you highlight in your previous post.
  11. grrclark

    14 million in poverty

    One drives the other and my thinking is broadly the same as yours. However it is also a little bit too simplistic othwrwise we wouldn’t have a problem as it would be easy fixed. Whether we believe in capitalism or socialism there are always people who lose out and people who prosper. True communism is the idealists answer, but that has never and will never work. The problem is human nature, we’re fundamentally greedy, selfish and self interested as a race and that is never going to change. We are masters at exploiting situations to suit our own interests, that’s why we’re carrying guns and driving cars whilst the other animals don’t.
  12. grrclark

    14 million in poverty

    At that time life education came from the family home and society, I don’t believe that is done to nearly the same extent. If you read some of the associated articles around the poverty measure headlines you will see examples of kids arriving at primary school, aged 5, still in nappies and unable to perform the most basic of motor skills you would expect of a child that age. In one example the child didn’t even know its own name. Regrettably we need life lessons in schools as there is a very real shortage of it in lots of sections of our society outside of schools.
  13. grrclark

    canabis oil

    Along with someone said on Youtube !! I am a keen advocate for further research into cannabinoid treatments, and also for legalisation in general, but the amount of snake oil nonsense peddled around the stuff is very alarming. Same with the anti-vax movement, which is of course why we are now seeing incidences of diseases such as mumps and measles increasing again across western nations. If only there was such a magical cure for ignorance and stupidity...!
  14. grrclark

    14 million in poverty

    Aled, I believe that you are correct, there is a poverty of knowledge, or certainly of real world wisdom. I personally think our educational curriculum has become far too heavily skewed towards academic results (that’s easy to measure) and misses out on education for life.
  15. grrclark

    14 million in poverty

    That is too simplistic an answer as well though. If you increase the wages of everyone you simply make the costs of goods more expensive too so it cancels itself out. Despite what many on here seem to think the vast majority of businesses don’t deliberately shaft their employees to keep the boss better off. I have talked on this forum before about the last company I was an employee, and director, of. In the UK, going back 5 or so years, we were paying people around £15k per year to pack cardboard boxes, zero skill job just relying on some manual dexterity and a lot of forebearance to put up with such a dull job. The ones who packed cardboard boxes on the nighshift had a 25% uplift. Skilled electronic debug technicians got around £25k. So about £500 a month difference in real terms for doing a job that required a college education, the pressure of getting the diagnosis correct and continuous upskillIng versus lifting stuff up and down, and not even heavy stuff. You were right on the question of “where is the incentive to work hard?” In our Romanian factory we were paying one fifth to one third of those rates purerly because of the lower cost of doing business in Romania. It cost us more to pack boxes in the UK than it did to debug a circuit board to component level in Romania. We were paying the maximum the market would bear in the UK without binning 1600 UK jobs and shipping it all overseas. The only reason the market would sustain that price differential between Romania and the UK was because of the lead time associated with shipping stuff to Romania and back again, proximity to the market saved the UK jobs. If UK prices were forced to go up due to a change in cost in the UK through a general mandatory uplift in salaries the market would either need sufficient desire to carry that increase or it would change, ultimately the end user consumer decides what is or isn’t affordable and the market will change if the consumer says so. That is the reality of a hell of a lot of business in the UK, we are uncompetitive relative to many economies round about us in the global market, largely because of the growth in property prices and as a reaction to that we have to pay bigger wages and so the costs of goods, including property, goes up and it becomes a self propagating nightmare. One of the biggest problems the UK has is that it has become a very consumerist society of disposable goods that we love to buy cheaply and as we love to buy cheaply we have to import as we are too expensive as a market to make them ourselves. That is a self propagating nightmare too. Just look at the number of relatively new cars in the UK versus countries with economies that are still hungry. We cannot put the genie back in the bottle, at least not quickly and not without a wholescale change in our own expectations and sense of entitlement.
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