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I was out in Crews Hill for those who know it on Sunday with the wife and going to buy cat food we stopped to look at the puppies as you do.

 

The wife has gone absolutely nuts on two Japanese Akita's they had there for £750 each. To be honest they were really lovely pups, but if I was to get one I would find good breeders to buy one from.

 

The question I have is does anyone have any first hand experience with the breed? Since Sunday we have done quite a bit of research on them and other than a couple of points on various sites she has not been put off by them.

 

We used to have a Bull Mastif cross Rottweiler and I have also owned a Doberman, so we are used to big dogs. We are planning on moving out of London in the next few years so if all goes to plan we will have plenty of room for a dog that size.

 

Any comments welcome.......

 

For those who don't know

 

Pup

 

 

Adult

 

Edited by Cosd
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i had to shoot one for a guy who had some realy bad problems with it , it was nasty and the best end to it

 

then a few month later had to shoot another , they were from the same litter so i dont know if that meant anything

but japanese fighting dog gives the game away a bit

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There not very good family pets especially if you`ve got kids! My uncle had one and it pinned me up in a corner and then walked away, I would never trust one again, 3 weeks later it turned on my uncle sunk its teeth in his arm. he had him since he was 8 weeks old too. They also dont get along with other dogs and animals.

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There not very good family pets especially if you`ve got kids! My uncle had one and it pinned me up in a corner and then walked away, I would never trust one again, 3 weeks later it turned on my uncle sunk its teeth in his arm. he had him since he was 8 weeks old too. They also dont get along with other dogs and animals.

 

Someone I know had to get an adult one dealt with sharpish after it bit one of his grandkids.

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I knew a guy who had two of them. They were fine with people but seemed to bring out the worst in other dogs. They never appeared to start the fights but, boy, did they finish them!

 

The other thing with the brutes was the amount of hair that they shed - they seemed to moult twice a year & produced TONS & TONS of it!

 

I don't think I'd have one as a family pet - no matter how good they look.

 

Cheers

TT

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We are on our second and third Akitas. We previously had a number of German Shepherd dogs.

 

They are not small - our bitch is 90 pounds, the dog 140 pounds, but they are very good temperamentally. They are not as affectionate as GSDs - I would describe them as slightly aloof. I would never leave them alone with a child or adult, but then again, I would never leave any dog alone with a stranger. You just don't know.

 

They are the least aggressive dogs we have owned - they ignore other dogs and people. The only exception is when strangers start grabbing them to stroke them. They object. Having said that, I totally agree with Trousers Too

I knew a guy who had two of them. They were fine with people but seemed to bring out the worst in other dogs. They never appeared to start the fights but, boy, did they finish them!
.

 

My dog has been attacked whilst on a lead about 7 or 8 times. It has invariably made a mess of the other dog.

 

I would also describe them as slightly stubborn and very protective. I was surprised about the comments about shedding hair. Ours shed very little and do not have a doggy smell.

 

Overall, I love them to bits, but make sure these are the dogs for you. Nice and cuddly when young, but they grow up.

Edited by Gordon R
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If you want to walk a dog on a leash all its life, feel need to dominate an animal every day to prevent it dominating you and like to keep your dogs and children / grandchildren entirely seperate then go ahead and buy one. But, before you do, just read between the lines from this from a pro-Akita website:

 

Guarding

 

Akitas are strong-willed animals that seem to have a wired-in protective instinct that isn't likely to be suppressed. All dogs have the ability to read human situations, probably through the detection and evaluation of certain pheromones (a type of scent given off by humans and perceived by the dog), originating from their owners, and perhaps from other dogs. They can sense fear or challenge when confronted by strange humans or dogs, even if no threatening gestures or sounds are made. A dominant Akita isn't apt to back down from anyone or anything.

 

The solid, tough, determined Akita is therefore an excellent guard dog without any special training whatsoever. Little or no encouragement is needed to whet its instinctive interest in protecting its home and family. Its strength, loyalty, and agility make it a formidable living security system in your home. Though it is a peace-loving pet, it will meet any challenge it perceives.

 

Warning

 

To invest in guard training can be a serious mistake, and one that might convert a fine family companion into a monster. Some Akita breeders support this statement to the degree that they won't sell a puppy to anyone who intends to put it to work as a guard dog. Akitas over-train easily, and take their training to heart, which ruins them as companion dogs and family pets. Akitas that have received guard training rarely make satisfactory pets.

 

Personally I wouldn't touch one with a barge pole.

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If you want to walk a dog on a leash all its life (surely you should always walk all dogs on a lead anyway), feel need to dominate an animal every day to prevent it dominating you (all dogs need remined every so often who's boss) and like to keep your dogs and children / grandchildren entirely seperate (thats usually a good idea, i dont know how many times i was bitten by my granda's pekingese when i was a kid) then go ahead and buy one. But, before you do, just read between the lines from this from a pro-Akita website:

 

 

 

Personally I wouldn't touch one with a barge pole.

 

as for the rest :good:

 

Guarding

 

Akitas are strong-willed animals that seem to have a wired-in protective instinct that isn't likely to be suppressed (like rottweilers, alsatians, etc). All dogs have the ability to read human situations (all dogs!), probably through the detection and evaluation of certain pheromones (a type of scent given off by humans and perceived by the dog), originating from their owners, and perhaps from other dogs. They can sense fear or challenge when confronted by strange humans or dogs, even if no threatening gestures or sounds are made. A dominant Akita isn't apt to back down from anyone or anything (the same as any other dominat dog, be it a bull mastiff or a corgi).

 

The solid, tough, determined Akita is therefore an excellent guard dog without any special training whatsoever (like quite alot of other breeds). Little or no encouragement is needed to whet its instinctive interest in protecting its home and family (again, like other breeds). Its strength, loyalty, and agility make it a formidable living security system in your home (3rd time, like other breeds). Though it is a peace-loving pet, it will meet any challenge it perceives (4th time, LIKE OTHER BREEDS!).

 

Warning

 

To invest in guard training can be a serious mistake, and one that might convert a fine family companion into a monster (very sensible statement). Some Akita breeders support this statement to the degree that they won't sell a puppy to anyone who intends to put it to work as a guard dog (not just akita breeders). Akitas over-train easily, and take their training to heart, which ruins them as companion dogs and family pets. Akitas that have received guard training rarely make satisfactory pets.

 

 

dont have first hand experience of them myself, but i know people who do, and reading through the above i cant see anything in it that couldnt be used to describe a rottweiler/alsatian/doberman/mastiff, etc. cosd, im surprisede you asked this on here, going by previous posts regarding devil dogs i surprised you havnt been lined up against a wall and shot by now for wanting to own one of these baby mincing japanese serial killers! :good: if you know how to handle large dogs then go for it, if you abide by the 3 simple rules i dont see what the problem is - 1 always let the dog know who's boss, 2 never trust a dog (esp with kids, etc), 3 always keep it under control (on a lead, a well secured garden, etc); and thats not just large breed, every dog no matter the type should have those rules applied to it :lol:

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COSD get her to look at a pointer of some description, if its not as a shooting dog and pet they are far easier. As for the advice above always walk a dog on a lead what tosh if you have a decent dog. Mine is on occasionally but off most of the time, friendly to other dogs and people I don't need to worry about her attacking dogs or people, contrast her to terriers I had that had to be walked on the lead and it takes all the fun out of it. I like having a laid back dog good with people and children yet still a dog that would be a deterrent to anyone breaking in. Why have a dog where the alarm bells ring before you've even got it home.

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A friend of mine had a pair of Akitas along with a ridgeback and a staffy. He was a very good dog trainer and used to big breeds. He totally dominates the dogs and they are under no doubt as to who is leader of 'the pack'. One of the akitas went berserk one day and nearly killed the staffy. She couldn't be controlled and was put down. The male they had also pinned my daugher to the ground, luckily the owner saw it and was on hand. He later did it to another kid and also ended up being destroyed. Not a friendly breed.

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I think there's enough on this thread to give any prospective owner the full "heads up" as to what the cute puppy bundle of fur grows up into :good:

 

They seem like quite the formidable breed.

 

If ever I own a scrap yard I'll be sure to get a dozen. Until then, I'll give them the swerve :good:

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as for the rest :good:

 

Guarding

 

Akitas are strong-willed animals that seem to have a wired-in protective instinct that isn't likely to be suppressed (like rottweilers, alsatians, etc). All dogs have the ability to read human situations (all dogs!), probably through the detection and evaluation of certain pheromones (a type of scent given off by humans and perceived by the dog), originating from their owners, and perhaps from other dogs. They can sense fear or challenge when confronted by strange humans or dogs, even if no threatening gestures or sounds are made. A dominant Akita isn't apt to back down from anyone or anything (the same as any other dominat dog, be it a bull mastiff or a corgi).

 

The solid, tough, determined Akita is therefore an excellent guard dog without any special training whatsoever (like quite alot of other breeds). Little or no encouragement is needed to whet its instinctive interest in protecting its home and family (again, like other breeds). Its strength, loyalty, and agility make it a formidable living security system in your home (3rd time, like other breeds). Though it is a peace-loving pet, it will meet any challenge it perceives (4th time, LIKE OTHER BREEDS!).

 

Warning

 

To invest in guard training can be a serious mistake, and one that might convert a fine family companion into a monster (very sensible statement). Some Akita breeders support this statement to the degree that they won't sell a puppy to anyone who intends to put it to work as a guard dog (not just akita breeders). Akitas over-train easily, and take their training to heart, which ruins them as companion dogs and family pets. Akitas that have received guard training rarely make satisfactory pets.

 

 

dont have first hand experience of them myself, but i know people who do, and reading through the above i cant see anything in it that couldnt be used to describe a rottweiler/alsatian/doberman/mastiff, etc. cosd, im surprisede you asked this on here, going by previous posts regarding devil dogs i surprised you havnt been lined up against a wall and shot by now for wanting to own one of these baby mincing japanese serial killers! :good: if you know how to handle large dogs then go for it, if you abide by the 3 simple rules i dont see what the problem is - 1 always let the dog know who's boss, 2 never trust a dog (esp with kids, etc), 3 always keep it under control (on a lead, a well secured garden, etc); and thats not just large breed, every dog no matter the type should have those rules applied to it :lol:

 

Ozzy,

I've worked and trained police dogs. My first working police dog had to be physically dominated virtually every day in order to keep him in line. He had over 60 operational bites. I used to be in charge of the procurement of unwanted pets that were offered to the police and have viewed and worked with many breeds in their own homes and at work. I have colleagues and acquaintances who have owned this breed and have offered assistance to help them with issues. Believe me, there is a world of difference in dominating a GSD or Rottie than an Akita. The dogs seem to be pre-conditioned to be the boss whereas a GSD and Rottie are predispositioned to be part of a pack.

 

I could walk my GSD police dogs off leash and let them roam on paths knowing full well that I had an instant and 100% recall and that they were pet safe. My wife could walk the retired dog off leash and had no problems meeting people or pets. I could let him wander round the briefing room or school classroom in total safety.

 

I come across Akita owners regularly when walking my own dog. I have never seen one off the leash, and usually they are being walked on remote paths where they don't come across other dogs or people. In fact one woman thought it OK to walk her two through the private fields on our shoot to avoid other dogs.

 

There are few non-toy breeds that I would never consider owning and the Akita is one of them. I realise that some people will have the circumstances to get the best out of the breed, but this would in my opinion be very rare.

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Ozzy,

I've worked and trained police dogs. My first working police dog had to be physically dominated virtually every day in order to keep him in line. He had over 60 operational bites. I used to be in charge of the procurement of unwanted pets that were offered to the police and have viewed and worked with many breeds in their own homes and at work. I have colleagues and acquaintances who have owned this breed and have offered assistance to help them with issues. Believe me, there is a world of difference in dominating a GSD or Rottie than an Akita. The dogs seem to be pre-conditioned to be the boss whereas a GSD and Rottie are predispositioned to be part of a pack.

 

I could walk my GSD police dogs off leash and let them roam on paths knowing full well that I had an instant and 100% recall and that they were pet safe. My wife could walk the retired dog off leash and had no problems meeting people or pets. I could let him wander round the briefing room or school classroom in total safety.

 

I come across Akita owners regularly when walking my own dog. I have never seen one off the leash, and usually they are being walked on remote paths where they don't come across other dogs or people. In fact one woman thought it OK to walk her two through the private fields on our shoot to avoid other dogs.

 

There are few non-toy breeds that I would never consider owning and the Akita is one of them. I realise that some people will have the circumstances to get the best out of the breed, but this would in my opinion be very rare.

 

There is a guy that walks one near me and as mentioned he can never let it off the lead, combined with this it is very aggressive with other dogs.

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Ozzy,

I've worked and trained police dogs. My first working police dog had to be physically dominated virtually every day in order to keep him in line. He had over 60 operational bites. I used to be in charge of the procurement of unwanted pets that were offered to the police and have viewed and worked with many breeds in their own homes and at work. I have colleagues and acquaintances who have owned this breed and have offered assistance to help them with issues. Believe me, there is a world of difference in dominating a GSD or Rottie than an Akita. The dogs seem to be pre-conditioned to be the boss whereas a GSD and Rottie are predispositioned to be part of a pack.

 

I could walk my GSD police dogs off leash and let them roam on paths knowing full well that I had an instant and 100% recall and that they were pet safe. My wife could walk the retired dog off leash and had no problems meeting people or pets. I could let him wander round the briefing room or school classroom in total safety.

 

I come across Akita owners regularly when walking my own dog. I have never seen one off the leash, and usually they are being walked on remote paths where they don't come across other dogs or people. In fact one woman thought it OK to walk her two through the private fields on our shoot to avoid other dogs.

 

There are few non-toy breeds that I would never consider owning and the Akita is one of them. I realise that some people will have the circumstances to get the best out of the breed, but this would in my opinion be very rare.

 

 

as i said ive no first hand experience of owning an akita myself, i know a few people who have/had them, ive never heard any bad reports apart from them being a bit energetic and bouncy - ive heard more bad reports about miniature german schnauzers than any big dogs :lol:; any akita's ive come across have been fine, but again as i pointed out before i never owned one. one thing i will question, and dont take this the wrong way, but you keep saying about having police dogs. ok, its great that they can walk around freely without hassle, but surely being a police dog they are far better trained (and to a more rigorous degree) than the average pet would be; in fact better trained than the average owner would be capable of :good:

 

as for walking the dogs on leads, personally i think thats a GOOD thing. i never trust a dog, no matter what type or how well trained it is. on top of that if im in a public place i always keep my rotties on a lead, not for the protection of the public but for the protection of the dog - if some idiots dog is off a lead and it attacks mine itll be cries of "of that rottweiler attacked my springer/lab/corgi" whereas if mine are on a lead theyre safe as the third party doesnt have a leg to stand on :good: also if the woman felt the need to walk her dogs through private land to avoid other dogs i'd question her ability to control her dogs more than the breed itself. one shout and my dogs cower, im not proud of it but its necessary. also im a big lad, 16ish stone (seasonally variable...) and 6' 2" so im big enough to control them :lol:

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My neighbour up road the has one, he says never again, was bought for the daughter who is now at university and its him having to walk her at 5 in the morning when no one else is around, lovely looking big dog but terrible temperment. I personally wouldn't leave my springers alone with a child let alone an Akita!!

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Its always the owners and not the dogs fault anyway eh Dazza :good:

 

Technically the owner has responsibility for the dog, end of.

 

However, if it is being suggested that certain dogs have certain specific characteristics and temperaments then yes I agree with that. Some dogs are soppy, some are scrappers.

 

As above though, if you know you have a snappy dog then there should be a higher duty on the part of the owner to take responsibilty and handle it accordingly.

 

I will have a quick look on the akita forum to see how many owners say their dogs are soft as **** and great with kids....

 

GordonR has them and has experience of them and his words appear the most inciteful to me.

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One of the landowners I shoot for has two of these, one is relatively placid (as in it doesn't obviously want to tear me apart) the other is an absolute nutcase and aggressive. Both are kept behind 7 foot steel bars and are walked very late at night away from people. The nutty one constantly has to be reminded who's boss and even then has bit the owner twice, the 'placid' one is only placid as long as you aren't afraid of it, apparently if it knows you're a bit scared it'll go mental at you too.

 

Nice.

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