Jump to content

Recommended Posts

my cousin has a large scar on his upper arm and shoulder from a red setter which was a friends family pet which subsequently turned and decided to attack him when he was 9.

my neighbour (who keeps greyhounds) was terrified of dogs after being bitten by a labrador when he was younger.

a mate from school also has a scar on his face from a lab that but him when he was 7, he nearly lost his sight in one eye but looks well 'ard now.

 

...all true stories (and to think people give these breeds to blind people!)

 

another time from my childhood me and a friend found a lost yorkshire terrier, my mate went to stroke it and it turned and bit him!

another cousin had to have several stiches in his nose from when his stepmothers shi-tsu bit him!

the same cousin who was attacked by the red setter bought his daughter a bichon frise which has bitten his daughter and her friends on numerous occasions and is an evil ball of fluff!

 

and to think these are the new fashion accessory for kids!

 

now i know a lot of people who own many different breeds of dog and dont know anyone first hand that has been bitten by an akita!

 

i know these dogs are capable of hurting people bus so is every dog! its down to a good family environment, careful breeding and competent owners to ensure their dogs are controlled. and finally it is down to people who want to interact with dogs to know how to approach them!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 97
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

30 years a vet??? :good:

 

Well just passing on my comments - just exactly how do you attach a syringe to a broom handle, find a vein in a dog that has turned nasty and then press the plunger? Obviously - practice over 30 years. :yes::oops:

 

I will carry on plaiting sawdust whilst the vet continues his work. I would appreciate a blow by blow account of how this, seemingly stupid and impossible, task was completed.

 

I have a broom handle - I think I will become a vet. You don't seem to need much else. I had previously thought vets were highly qualified - the question is - in what?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow what a varied thread, a Friend has a Malamut Akita cross 3/4 Malamut 1/4 Akita hes is a bit aloof but not in anyway aggressive, still a pup albeit a big one! I am sure a friend of mine at junior school had (well parents) an akita which was fine, dont remeber getting bitten or attacked by it, do by my aunts Jack Russel tho!

 

The cross in question is loyal and friendly, I don't normally agree with muzzles on dogs but understand the reasons for some. While chatting to some malamut owners they explained that their dogs were muzzled to keep the weight of the lead on the nose to control them and they attracted unwanted attention from small dogs, every dog is different and every situation varied but it seems there are plenty of akita horror stories on here for some reason.

 

I have often walked and socialised my friends dog, and nothing untoward has happened yet....but then he is a cross not a pure...

Link to post
Share on other sites

fortune82 - I would still be interested in just how he managed such a seemingly impossible task.

 

Normally, the vet has to shave an area on a front leg, find a vein, then insert the syringe and press the plunger. I honestly can't see how it was all managed via a broom handle. :yes::hmm::lol:

 

Perhaps they have more sophisticated broom handles in your part of the country. :good::yes::oops:

Link to post
Share on other sites

What a fantastic video of Toka, that really cheered up my morning. Reminded me of my two play scrapping. I have only ever met one Akita, and he was totally disinterested in me. Obviously a good judge of character.

 

In a former life I was a BT engineer. Got bit by a couple of dogs, a mad JRT and a farm collie. Had a GSD go for me once, but he was cooped up in a small seaside flat with a very old pensioner. Like all things, environment and experience play a great deal in behaviour, as well as genetics.

Link to post
Share on other sites
fortune82 - I would still be interested in just how he managed such a seemingly impossible task.

 

Normally, the vet has to shave an area on a front leg, find a vein, then insert the syringe and press the plunger. I honestly can't see how it was all managed via a broom handle. :lol::lol::lol:

 

Perhaps they have more sophisticated broom handles in your part of the country. :hmm::hmm::lol:

 

 

not if they use something that can go into muscle. back in the late 80's I remember a similar technique being used in kennels with pit bulls prior to them being put down. I've also seen it used on cattle escaped on the A1 embankment to sedate them, its no different to any kind of tranquiliser dart etc they can all go into muscle depending what drugs you use

Link to post
Share on other sites
not if they use something that can go into muscle. back in the late 80's I remember a similar technique being used in kennels with pit bulls prior to them being put down. I've also seen it used on cattle escaped on the A1 embankment to sedate them, its no different to any kind of tranquiliser dart etc they can all go into muscle depending what drugs you use

 

So what your saying is you can put an animal to sleep by injecting it in the muscle with a tranquiliser dart?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have an axe to grind with the Akita one way or another, but my thinking would relate to the reason the breed was developed the way it was (for hunting/guarding) and how far diluted from it's original, highly aggresive ancestors is stock in the current gene pool? I would be looking at the same thing if I ever had cause to own a breed that was intended to have aggresive qualities.

Link to post
Share on other sites
So what your saying is you can put an animal to sleep by injecting it in the muscle with a tranquiliser dart?

 

 

I was young at the time but I know they were knocked out but can't remember if it needed a final dose intravenously or not. I was purely suggesting that fortune might not have been talking out of his harris as the vet I've seen do it was slightly older and improvising to avoid anyone having to go in and handle them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
So what your saying is you can put an animal to sleep by injecting it in the muscle with a tranquiliser dart?

 

 

Yes you can and it is done all the time when capturing animals

As a junior doc we had cause to do this with some of our more difficult patients, so no problem with methord.

doc

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no experience of Akitas so I cannot comment on their temprament etc etc, but where pets are concerned I observe the same maxim as someone else on here (cant remember who). I simply would not feel comfortable having an animal in the house that I wouldnt have a decent chance of winning a fight with.

 

Each to their own.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes you can and it is done all the time when capturing animals

As a junior doc we had cause to do this with some of our more difficult patients, so no problem with methord.

doc

 

Your talking about sedating. I'm talking about euthanizing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

euthanasing is only an overdose though so I'd guess something like Imobilon would do the job though take longer to work and probably need a bigger dose. I'm sure apache will be along to say what you could use, personally best option with dangerous dogs is a bullet but some people really dislike the most humane and safest approach

Link to post
Share on other sites

Zapp - a detached and sensible view amongst some of the drivel.

 

Each to his own. I am just about to start googling cocker rage.

 

Wasn't hard:-

And to think that a small dog cannot inflict serious damage or even kill is a dangerous assumption. In October 2000 a pet pomeranian (a 6 lb dog) attacked and killed a 6 week old baby. In February 2002 a jack russell terrier mauled an infant.

 

According to an anonymous animal shelter poll terriers and cocker spaniels are responsible for most of the bites they experience or hear about. Roughly 1 out of 5 dachshunds bites or attempts to bite. The ever-popular fashion accessory Chihuahua is also a widely known "vicious" breed.

 

http://www.seefido.com/dog-discussion-foru...ics-t10740.html

 

Next I polled a number of veterinarians. One veterinarian said to me, "Give me a so-called vicious Pit Bull over a Cocker Spaniel, Dachshund, or even a Lab any day!! These are the breeds I have the most problem with." Another vet concurred saying that in years of working at a veterinarian clinic she never once encountered a single vicious Pit bull yet had problems all the time with Cocker Spaniels and Yorkshire Terriers.

 

http://www.game-dog.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5956

Edited by Gordon R
Link to post
Share on other sites

After reading your posts, I agree about an Akita and I'm not sure about a Cocker. You are very selective in what you quote and even more sparing with details of the vet. I am tempted to ask how a vet got into a room with a vicious brute, climbed on to a table, without mishap and bravely speared the brute. :lol::lol::lol:

 

I don't really think I am that interested anymore. You have a closed mind - good luck with your irrational prejudice. It must help going through life without letting facts cloud any issue. :hmm::hmm:

 

Incidentally - how do you think a child would fare when faced with Cocker rage? Something you might wish to ponder.

Edited by Gordon R
Link to post
Share on other sites
I have no experience of Akitas so I cannot comment on their temprament etc etc, but where pets are concerned I observe the same maxim as someone else on here (cant remember who). I simply would not feel comfortable having an animal in the house that I wouldnt have a decent chance of winning a fight with.

 

Each to their own.

 

i totally agree with zap ,

after owning a gsd , a nasty security trained dobey , then kids so no dogs and now a lab i think the advice should be

 

if you havnt got children , accept that exersise may allways be on a lead and you and yr mrs think you can handle a tantrum , go for it . dogs are dogs , they are what they turn out to be .

:hmm:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mungler - very reliable, as ever. :hmm::hmm: Point taken.

 

I would not wish to own a Cocker if they had this tendency - smaller dog or not. It just niggles me that posters are all too happy to jump on any bandwagon, without a care for the damage they do to breed reputation. I have never heard of Akita rage and I did my homework before getting one. The minute a Terrier or Rotty hits the press, the world and his wife emerge with stories of how one glared at them menacingly, obviously wanting to kill them. They can tell with their special vision, but few brain cells.

 

Funnily enough, I liked the look of Leonburgers - saw one in real life - absolutely majestic beast. Smashing temperament. When we lost our last GSD, our shortlist for a new dog contained - Alaskan Malamute, Leonburger, Polish Maremma, Anatolian Shepherd. We settled on the Malamute. I was dissuaded by their alleged tendency to bark, fight and run off. Whilst speaking to a reputable Malamute breeder, she suggested an Akita - which is how we ended up with them.

 

 

As others have said - each to his own.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys, firstly let me apologise for not replying to any posts, been busy but have been watching with interest.

I appreciate everyones view but with respect to the stories of "I know a mates one and it bit someone", that really doesn't indicate the breed however bad the attack. We all know that dogs can bite, there will always be a bad apple in any breed including the most docile.

 

What this thread has shown me is that the Akita is strong minded and needs a good home that is just as firm as it is loving; As I said in my original post, I have owned big "dangerous" breeds in the past and this method served me well. I bought up two daughters and have always been surrounded with friends and family and am fortunate enough to say that I have never had an incident occur with any of my "devil" dogs.

 

I am still drawn to the breed and though I am enjoying most of the debate here, I will also be doing more research on Akita forums.

 

Keep those pictures coming guys, I think most people who have posted will agree they are a handsome beast !!

 

Two more questions if I may, what is the difference between an American and a Japanese Akita?

There is also quite a variance in full grown size, apart from the difference in gender, are there different types or is it just they differ so much?

 

 

Cos

Link to post
Share on other sites

dazza - never heard of them, but I will investigate.

 

Cosd - I did a bit of asking around about the difference in Amercian and Japanese. I am quite willing to be corrected, but three breeders told me that the Japanese versions tended to be truer to the old standard and bred for temperament. The Americans allegedly bred for size - with temperament secondary. I am sure a few Akita breeders might take umbrage, but this is honestly what I was told.

 

Our first Akita was a Japanese origin bitch - 100 lbs who chewed quite a few rare records, my suite and carpet. Cost me a few thousand quid. Lost her - age 3 - when she was run down - I was still holding her lead - by an out of control speeding driver. She was the most affectionate.

 

Second Akita is of American origin - 140 lbs - fluffy monster. The Dog Warden - on a visit following a dog attacking mine - wrote in her notes that his head was two feet wide. She should have known better, but he is big - 28" at the shoulder and built like a brick outhouse. Least affectionate - only on his terms. When he wants stroking, he ambles up and hit you with his head or sticks out a paw and gives you a high five. Quite a funny dog. I am probably wrong, but he appears to have a sense of humour.

 

Third Akita is of Japanese origin - 90 lbs. Never been in any sort of fight - dogs never attack her - no idea why they head for the larger dog, but very aloof with strangers - great with friends.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really interested in your opinion. You don't debate, you trot out prejudice in my book. If it serves you to be like that - good luck. I would prefer not to be attacked at all.

 

Incidentally - Akitas were bred (not designed) to hunt wild bear and boar - same as Cockers - just larger. I assume that small birds and mammals in your area prefer to be hunted by a Cocker - perhaps they don't care, but just don't like being hunted.

 

Ponder that.

Edited by Gordon R
Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...