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no smoking ban


shawn9914
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Smokers have wrights WELL AWAY FROM OTHERS.

 

Thanks Peltman, I was going to ask the other day what the difference between a typo and spelling mistake is - I think I know now :D:D

 

Not a dig at you at all mate, it's for some ex-grammar school boy called mobilchoke or invector or something....

Edited by stuartp
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I'm for it 100%, getting up the next day, stinking of smoke from the previous night, you can keep it for me, you want to smell like that, fair enough.

 

A bloke on the local radio today complained that he would have to go outside in all weathers to smoke while at the bar, as if it was a big deal. Wanted everyone to have sympathy for him. Wasn't that before hand, when he had none for the non-smokers, **** him, get use to it, it's long over due.

 

Bazooka Joe :D

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Apparently fat people cost the NHS millions every year. :D:D :o

 

Jonno

Jonno is right lets ban eating. :D

 

Ok seriously, I went to New Zealand last year and they have a smoking ban in public places. It was great you come back for the pub and something is wrong but you can put your finger on it then it hits you, your clothes don't stink of fags and your eyes aren't sore. All the smokers in the pub just go outside when they want a fag.

 

However if this is to protect the public from themselves because they are not able to make an informed decision about how they conduct their lives then I disagree with a total ban. If cigarettes are so bad for you and so costly to the state in terms of the NHS them make them illegal full stop. It is stupid to allow a product to be sold which you then can't smoke anywhere. The government make billions a year in tax from tobacco and they are funded by the fag companies so they would never do it.

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As a smoker this is obviously going to affect me, but in reality i'll probably give it up. I've been wanting to give for ages so this the final nail, so to speak.

 

However, alot of business's are going to suffer because of the blanket ban. I work with the Hospitality trade and I know many of the business owners are very concerned, particularly the Publicans. They are going to be made responsible for stopping smoking in thier premises.

 

I can see both sides of the argument but cant see a fair solution to them either. Designated smoking areas wouldnt work for many establishments as they dont have the room. With smokers in a minority, they are going to loose out.

 

Funny that this subject has been afforded so much time and money, when there are much more inportant minority issues that need resolving.

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SNAKEBITE

 

 

I am not frightend to say: there are members of the public who dont have the brains (people who buy the sun & others) to protect themself, rules & regulations arn't just to control but to help protect the lives & health of others.

 

The Pelt Man

Then these stupid people die early hopefully without breeding.

 

All part of the natural selection.

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Apparently fat people cost the NHS millions every year. :D:D:D

This is slightly different as you don't die of "passive fatness".

However people do have the choice to eat healthily and sensibly or eat **** and become obese. I for one eat like a pig. Not exactly unhealthily but I just eat a lot. Therefore I try to exercise to keep on top of things. If I don't I will become fat, have a heart attack and die early. I KNOW this and it is upto me to deal with it. I do not blame others when I put on weight and I'm not going to complain to the government and ask them to ban fatty foods!

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I don't smoke so I'm happy - comes into force in Scotland next month. Had my meal last Saturday spoiled by 4 smokers at the next table who were finishing as we were starting.

 

There's more to it than just pubs/restaurants though. Football grounds, waiting areas, stations, depots, places of work, etc, etc may be affected.

 

Why should a cleaner have to put her health at risk when she goes to clean the smoker at work, or clean the pub, hotel room, whatever? The bill is as much about protecting those who have NO choice as opposed to those of us who can simply go to another pub.

 

As for the NHS, I believe the government takes in more in taxes levied on tobacco sales than it costs the NHS to treat smokers, so smokers are already more than funding their healthcare.

 

Piebob

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I think Piebob has hit the nail on the head. It's all very well to say that it should be the landlord's choice etc, but what about the staff who can either put up with stinking of smoke all the time or walk away from a job they might have worked hard to get, or might be very convenient for them?

 

This does smack of the nanny state though. Instinctively I'm against banning anything, but it will be nice to go out for the night without ponging of tobacco smoke.

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Why should a cleaner have to put her health at risk when she goes to clean the smoker at work, or clean the pub, hotel room, whatever? The bill is as much about protecting those who have NO choice as opposed to those of us who can simply go to another pub.

Then perhaps the bill should be changed to give them a choice. There are many no smoking establishments who have made good business by offering clean air. So non-smokers have a choice to use them or not, smokers dont get a choice.

 

One things for sure, i'm gonna be looking to invest in shares of companies that provide, Patio Marquee's and such like. They will be popping up all over england. My local pub ahs even mentioned putting a bar outside in one, in its beer garden.

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I totally aggree with an all out ban, short term it may well effect hosptality bussinesses however long term smokers will still want to go out and drink and go for meals ect. Its proven that passive smoking harms other peoples health so that is the main reason, apart the smell that I aggree with a ban. Terry

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I think Piebob has hit the nail on the head. It's all very well to say that it should be the landlord's choice etc, but what about the staff who can either put up with stinking of smoke all the time or walk away from a job they might have worked hard to get, or might be very convenient for them?

I know what you are saying but we went for a drink last night and the only people in the pub smoking were the barman round the front of the bar when he had 5 minutes and the chef who kept popping out of the kitchen for a fag. So it cuts both ways.

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Nothing worse than sitting down for a meal and someone sparks up next to you, and i smoke so it must be terrible for someone who dont. Worse still is if you've got the little one's with you. As for a total ban, i aint going outside everytime i want a fag, i'll be out there all night the way i smoke when im drinking :rolleyes: Time to get the patches out i think (again). All for it

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speaking from the point of view of a total nicotine addict (60 a day) i don't think the ban will do a lot of pubs any favours , i drink very little these days but i certainly wouldn't go into a pub where i couldn't have a cigarette for hours on end, although i'm a heavy smoker i try not to let my habit annoy others , i never smoke if anyone around me is eating and if i'm in the company of a non smoker i always ask permission before lighting up (as several guys from pw will tell you ) , although i'm a heavy smoker i think it's a disgusting habit that makes me smell ,makes me cough, takes too much of my money and will undoubtedly kill me in the end, and before snakebite tells me i'm an idiot :rolleyes: for smoking don't bother mate , i know all the facts and still i can't stop, i despise every cigarette i smoke and i get no pleasure from smoking whatsoever , i would suspect that most heavy smokers are in the same position as me but totally unable to stop.

Edited by mel b3
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SECONDHAND SMOKE

 

I gave up smoking, for one reason and one reason only. I was slowly killing myself

 

The total ban next year may also help others to stop smoking for the good of there health

 

Introduction

 

Breathing other people's smoke is called passive, involuntary or secondhand smoking. The non-smoker breathes "sidestream" smoke from the burning tip of the cigarette and "mainstream" smoke that has been inhaled and then exhaled by the smoker. Secondhand smoke (SHS) is a major source of indoor air pollution.

 

 

 

What's in the smoke?

 

Tobacco smoke contains over 4000 chemicals in the form of particles and gases. [1] Many potentially toxic gases are present in higher concentrations in sidestream smoke than in mainstream smoke and nearly 85% of the smoke in a room results from sidestream smoke. [2] The particulate phase includes tar (itself composed of many chemicals), nicotine, benzene and benzo(a)pyrene. The gas phase includes carbon monoxide, ammonia, dimethylnitrosamine, formaldehyde, hydrogen cyanide and acrolein. Some of these have marked irritant properties and some 60 are known or suspected carcinogens (cancer causing substances). The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the USA has classified environmental tobacco smoke as a class A (known human) carcinogen along with asbestos, arsenic, benzene and radon gas. 1

 

 

 

How does this affect the passive smoker?

 

Some of the immediate effects of passive smoking include eye irritation, headache, cough, sore throat, dizziness and nausea. Adults with asthma can experience a significant decline in lung function when exposed, while new cases of asthma may be induced in children whose parents smoke. Short term exposure to tobacco smoke also has a measurable effect on the heart in non-smokers. Just 30 minutes exposure is enough to reduce coronary blood flow. [3]

 

 

 

In the longer term, passive smokers suffer an increased risk of a range of smoking-related diseases. Non-smokers who are exposed to passive smoking in the home, have a 25 per cent increased risk of heart disease and lung cancer. [4] A major review by the Government-appointed Scientific Committee on Tobacco and Health (SCOTH) concluded that passive smoking is a cause of lung cancer and ischaemic heart disease in adult non-smokers, and a cause of respiratory disease, cot death, middle ear disease and asthmatic attacks in children. [5] A more recent review of the evidence by SCOTH found that the conclusions of its initial report still stand i.e. that there is a “causal effect of exposure to secondhand smoke on the risks of lung cancer, ischaemic heart disease and a strong link to adverse effects in children”. [6] A review of the risks of cancer from exposure to secondhand smoke by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) noted that “the evidence is sufficient to conclude that involuntary smoking is a cause of lung cancer in never smokers”. [7] A study published in the British Medical Journal suggests that previous studies of the effects of passive smoking on the risk of heart disease may have been under-estimated. The researchers found that blood cotinine levels among non-smokers were associated with a 50-60% increased risk of heart disease. [8]

 

 

 

Deaths from secondhand smoke

 

Whilst the relative health risks from passive smoking are small in comparison with those from active smoking, because the diseases are common, the overall health impact is large. Professor Konrad Jamrozik, formerly of Imperial College London, has estimated that domestic exposure to secondhand smoke in the UK causes around 2,700 deaths in people aged 20-64 and a further 8,000 deaths a year among people aged 65 years or older. Exposure to secondhand smoke at work is estimated to cause the death of more than two employed persons per working day across the UK as a whole (617 deaths a year), including 54 deaths a year in the hospitality industry. This equates to about one-fifth of all deaths from secondhand smoke in the general population and up to half of such deaths among employees in the hospitality trades. [9]

 

 

 

Risk to young children

 

Almost half of all children in the UK are exposed to tobacco smoke at home. [10] Passive smoking increases the risk of lower respiratory tract infections such as bronchitis, pneumonia and bronchiolitis in children. One study found that in households where both parents smoke, young children have a 72 per cent increased risk of respiratory illnesses. [11] Passive smoking causes a reduction in lung function and increased severity in the symptoms of asthma in children, and is a risk factor for new cases of asthma in children. [12] [13] Passive smoking is also associated with middle ear infection in children as well as possible cardiovascular impairment and behavioural problems. [14]

 

 

 

Infants of parents who smoke are more likely to be admitted to hospital for bronchitis and pneumonia in the first year of life. More than 17,000 children under the age of five are admitted to hospital every year because of the effects of passive smoking. [15] Passive smoking during childhood predisposes children to developing chronic obstructive airway disease and cancer as adults. 15 Exposure to tobacco smoke may also impair olfactory function in children. A Canadian study found that passive smoking reduced children’s ability to detect a wide variety of odours compared with children raised in non-smoking households. [16] Passive smoking may also affect children’s mental development. A US study found deficits in reading and reasoning skills among children even at low levels of smoke exposure. [17]

 

 

 

 

 

Exposure to passive smoking during pregnancy is an independent risk factor for low birth weight. [18] A recent study has also shown that babies exposed to their mother’s tobacco smoke before they are born grow up with reduced lung function [19] Parental smoking is also a risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome (cot death). For more detailed information about the health effects of passive smoking on children see the ASH briefing: Passive Smoking: The impact on children

 

 

 

 

 

What protection is there for non-smokers?

 

In the public health White Paper published in November 2004, the Government set out proposals to ban smoking in most workplaces and public places. However, exemptions are proposed for pubs that do not serve food and private clubs. For further information about the White Paper proposals see Factsheet no 14 in this series: Smoking in workplaces and public places.

 

 

 

 

 

Reports and surveys

 

Public opinion surveys have shown widespread support for smoking restrictions in public places and this has been growing steadily in recent years. The 2002 government commissioned survey of smoking attitudes found that 86% of respondents (including 70% of smokers) agreed that smoking should be restricted at work and a similar proportion favoured smoking restrictions in restaurants. The survey also revealed that a majority of people supported smoking restrictions in pubs. [20]

 

 

 

A national survey commissioned by SmokeFree London found that over half of non-smoking employees (51%) are still exposed to tobacco smoke at work, with almost a third (31%) being exposed every day or most days. [21] A MORI survey commissioned by ASH found that 80% of respondents favoured a law to require all enclosed workplaces to be smokefree.[22] The same survey revealed that about 2.2 million people in the UK are exposed to passive smoking in their places of work.

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Dont worry Mel Snakebite is always asking me for a ciggy when we are out lamping! Didnt he mention it. :rolleyes:

I never said I was perfect, I just assumed you knew!

 

I know that having the odd ciggie is just plain daft. However I probably "smoke " less than someone who frequents a pub every night and is a non smoker. If I develop lung cancer then I have only myself to blame. If I don't like it then I won't go to the pub. I don't expect the locals to stop smoking just because I have popped in.

 

It really does not affect me if a ban is put in place it is the fact that a ban has been brought about that get's my goat.

They cannot ban everything that harms you. The one thing in life that is certain is that you will die. I just hope when my time comes it is quick. Cancer is not quick, so that should be an incentive to me really!

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Dont worry Mel Snakebite is always asking me for a ciggy when we are out lamping! Didnt he mention it. :rolleyes:

:rolleyes:;)

 

i should have mentioned in the first post , i used to work with a guy that was such a nicotene addict that he'd be smoking a cigarette and eating his dinner at the same time (i don't think a ban on public smoking would have stopped him), i used to find his habit disgusting but now i'm addicted to the things i can see what was happening with the guy,mind you he doesn't do it anymore as he died of lung cancer about 5 years ago , a genuinely nice guy that was totally hooked .

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a bit off thread again i know but who will enforce the ban ?, will it be the landlord that gets a fine or the individual with the cigarette ?, most of the pubs in my local area are a bit rough and ready to say the least and i just couldn,t see a police officer taking on half a dozen drunken brawlers over a ciggy.

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