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NUT Teachers strike


jacksdad
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Just been on the news that teachers are planning 'industrial action' after their pension details have been reviewed, along with retirement age.

A teacher put forward his arguement: he is expecting to retire at 51 years old on a full state pension, and complained that working longer, until 58, is a non starter as "teaching young kids when you are OLD won't be FUN" :angry:

Now, at a time when the rest of us are being told we must work until 70 years old, often in very hard going full time work, his comments have got me ranting...

Seething anger is a better description, how can all these public sector 'workers' carry on whinging about the poor deal they are getting whilst the rest of us are facing working until 70, then retiring on little or no pension as we cannot afford the contributions on our reduced salaries?

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Being a teacher myself ( a young one at that) but also a parent, whilst not being agest i would not want my kids to be taught by a 70 year old. TBH you would not want your granny or grandad to put up with the **** teachers have to put up with these days, what you hear in the press isn't even 1% of what happens.

 

Stick to what you know about (moaning?)

 

Mark (NASUWT member).

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Being a teacher myself ( a young one at that) but also a parent, whilst not being agest i would not want my kids to be taught by a 70 year old. TBH you would not want your granny or grandad to put up with the **** teachers have to put up with these days, what you hear in the press isn't even 1% of what happens.

 

Stick to what you know about (moaning?)

 

Mark (NASUWT member).

 

Well said mark, those who have never taught have no idea of the kind of pressure teachers are under.

I have been teaching now for 30 years and look forward to my retirement.

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Just been on the news that teachers are planning 'industrial action' after their pension details have been reviewed, along with retirement age.

A teacher put forward his arguement: he is expecting to retire at 51 years old on a full state pension, and complained that working longer, until 58, is a non starter as "teaching young kids when you are OLD won't be FUN" :angry:

Now, at a time when the rest of us are being told we must work until 70 years old, often in very hard going full time work, his comments have got me ranting...

Seething anger is a better description, how can all these public sector 'workers' carry on whinging about the poor deal they are getting whilst the rest of us are facing working until 70, then retiring on little or no pension as we cannot afford the contributions on our reduced salaries?

 

everyone given the choice would like to retire at 51.....

 

oh i know... fancy having to work till your 58!!

 

so when your job stops being fun you can retire?

 

Being a teacher myself ( a young one at that) but also a parent, whilst not being agest i would not want my kids to be taught by a 70 year old. TBH you would not want your granny or grandad to put up with the **** teachers have to put up with these days, what you hear in the press isn't even 1% of what happens.

 

Stick to what you know about (moaning?)

 

Mark (NASUWT member).

 

YOUNG!!!!

 

I couldnt be a teacher i dont have the patience but once again its going to affect the children.....exams are going to be disrupted and cant see there being much support for the teachers....

 

Teachers are like firemen/police/miners......you knew what you were signing up for so dont moan when it happens.... :yp:

 

 

Shaun....

Edited by shaun4860
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its like lots of demanding careers do you see yourself doing the job at 55 let alone 65/70,a soldier retires to a pension at 40ish but will follow another career before he or she retires at 65,so if they rock the boat to much the powers who be may scratch their heads abnd say they are past their best at 50 lets retire them on a reduced pension,and put in some new blood,as they say that much of what you learn in some subjects is out dated by the time that it has been taught ,and that is what the school has taught us

In the real world i would give my right testicle for 14 weeks holiday and every weekend off,i know they have a hard job!and can not see that terms and conditions can not be changed but if the pension fund is looking a bit dodgy for them join the rest of the country

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I assume teahers make contributions to their salary related pensions,just like the police,etc. It's the fools of this world who make no provisions for retirement (ie a private/work pension scheme where they pay a percentage of their pay into it) but expect the country to subsidise their golden years that bug me. If a teacher pays into a scheme and canretire at a resonable age then good luck, they do a very difficult job (no, I'm not a teacher).

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Let's face it, just about everyone in the private sector has had their T&Cs changed over the last 5 years and don't forget a lot of those paying had their funds raided by new liebour's windfall tax. (I don't think this applied to the public sector).

 

SWMBO who works for the Health service has just been told no you cant have your pension in 2 years time at 60, you've now got to work to 65 - you don't see them striking (heaven forfend).

 

So guys and gals the cupboard is bare most of the rest of us have to work on - just get over it.

Edited by Yellow Bear
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Let's face it, just about everyone in the private sector has had their T&Cs changed over the last 5 years and don't forget a lot of those paying had their funds raided by new liebour's windfall tax. (I don't think this applied to the public sector).

 

SWMBO who works for the Health service has just been told no you cant have your pension in 2 years time at 60, you've now got to work to 65 - you don't see them striking (heaven forfend).

 

So guys and gals the cupboard is bare most of the rest of us have to work on - just get over it.

 

+1

 

shaun

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i think theres merit in both sides of the argument but to be fair its hardly teachers fault that things are ****ty, nor is it the fault of nurses or other public workers - I'd rather see the govt show some balls and make the financial institutions hand over some cash rather than taking it from easy targets as usual <_<

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This year may just get very messy.

 

We need to be realistic, think of someone who is 60 - 65 and are they ideal person to climb a ladder into a burning building to rescue your kids, or to protect them during a riot? Of course not! Teach your kids - i think we can do better.

 

After signing up to this 25 years ago my body is hurt and sore because of it, i have been injured many times yet never complain about this, I am old beyond my years, and still do a 48 hour week, I also work part time to make up my disposable cash (all declared) and to make a better life for my family. I have never claimed a penny and have never been unemployed. I signed up to retire on my 50th birthday, 30 years service, and pay 11% of my wage each month for the last 25 year to allow me to do this. I have put up with lower wages than i could demand with the qualifications i have, and had before i joined.

 

The public sector did not create this problem, the banks and government did. The public sector cannot bail the country out, this is simply impossible, i am tempted to think they are using the current problems just to make cuts.

 

However, to date I hear no mention of politicians having their pension changed, i may be very wrong, but understand they get their pension after just one term in government, i have 30 years and 11% of my wages to get my pension. I now hear that i have to work longer, take a pay freeze, pay more into the pension, and have an average salary pension. Like so many - my life plans have been built round an annual pension statement, now, with about 6 years to go, because someone else messed up everything changes.

 

 

I really feel for folks who earn low wages, who cannot work or want to better themselves. But i have done my bit for a fair time now, I signed up to a deal 25 years ago and because of a banking problem it all changes. I know many others have lost jobs and homes, and this will get worse.

 

However i see no reason that this has to be taken out on the public sector.

 

Now it is easy to take the **** out of this post - so remember, if you leave your laptop on tonight, or your TV or printer, and it catches fire in the night, today you can guarantee every firefighter who attends will be under 55, next year, they could be 65!

Edited by DIVERD
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This year may just get very messy.

 

We need to be realistic, think of someone who is 60 - 65 and are they ideal person to climb a ladder into a burning building to rescue your kids, or to protect them during a riot? Of course not! Teach your kids - i think we can do better.

 

After signing up to this 25 years ago my body is hurt and sore because of it, i have been injured many times yet never complain about this, I am old beyond my years, and still do a 48 hour week, I also work part time to make up my disposable cash (all declared) and to make a better life for my family. I have never claimed a penny and have never been unemployed. I signed up to retire on my 50th birthday, 30 years service, and pay 11% of my wage each month for the last 25 year to allow me to do this. I have put up with lower wages than i could demand with the qualifications i have, and had before i joined.

 

The public sector did not create this problem, the banks and government did. The public sector cannot bail the country out, this is simply impossible, i am tempted to think they are using the current problems just to make cuts.

 

However, to date I hear no mention of politicians having their pension changed, i may be very wrong, but understand they get their pension after just one term in government, i have 30 years and 11% of my wages to get my pension. I now hear that i have to work longer, take a pay freeze, pay more into the pension, and have an average salary pension. Like so many - my life plans have been built round an annual pension statement, now, with about 6 years to go, because someone else messed up everything changes.

 

 

I really feel for folks who earn low wages, who cannot work or want to better themselves. But i have done my bit for a fair time now, I signed up to a deal 25 years ago and because of a banking problem it all changes. I know many others have lost jobs and homes, and this will get worse.

 

However i see no reason that this has to be taken out on the public sector.

 

Now it is easy to take the **** out of this post - so remember, if you leave your laptop on tonight, or your TV or printer, and it catches fire in the night, today you can guarantee every firefighter who attends will be under 55, next year, they could be 65!

 

 

you might be good at getting up ladders but sums are not your strong point, next year the chance is one or two could be 56 :lol: :lol: teaching is one area (particularly now and with present indiscipline in schools) that I would not do at any price, it must be the one job that retirement cant come quick enough, if they have met their obligations re time served and monies paid in, what right has any govt got to move the goal posts, I for one would support their proposed action fully.

 

KW

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TBH, I think there is a fair point to be made for both arguments, but the bloke Jacksdad referred to in the OP made my blood boil too. Yes firefighters need to be fit and well to do a demanding job therefore the chances of this line of work being suitable for the average 65 year old is very small indeed. However I'm sick and tired of the Public sector coming across as though their job is harder than everyone elses, what the Public sector need to understand is the banking crisis has crippled the Private sector with a devastating affect on companies and jobs, you know, news flash, we're in a recession. Now all of a sudden when it becomes apparent that there's no money left and cuts need to be made in the Public sector too it's not acceptable, the same rules should simply not apply. Well I'm sorry, ask anyone who's been made redundant, it's a **** deal all round, welcome to the real world.

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Good point KW.

 

In my defence (thinking quick) someone could actually join at 55 and beyond! Ok, it may not be next year, but it would be allowed.

 

Ian750, my job is no more difficult than anyone elses, i am trained to do it and have done it for a long time, but in the private sector you can move to another company to get a pay rise in the past, this drove up wages. Over the last decade folks had it good, i am told, and some were buying second houses to rent out. We were "modernised " 6 years ago, before the recession - destroying the service. I will (hopefully) have 1 employer until i retire - serving the public, doing a job for a fair wage, and at the end having a fair pension.

 

I am not complaining, i signed up to a 30 year deal and all i want is this to be realised. I have payed for it, in more ways than financially. When the recession is over, the private sector will slowly go back to where they were, the public sector will not.

 

Being brutal about it, banking is private sector, they broke it, perhaps they should fix it! I read with interest that a RBS manager, you know, one of the ones that broke it, has just been awarded a £6 million pension package. Now that has got to sting both public and private sector workers.

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berties, would you really give your left testicle? is that just a stupid phrase or a fact?

 

So Yellow Bear are you saying the health service have not or ever been on strike? or will not? watch this space. I would love to know your job and position. All words when your not affected, come on give me your sob story about what you have lost?

 

Shaun, remind me when you were affected by being a government employee, can you comment on it, NHS, police, teaching?

 

As a teacher my pension is based on 80th's, so after 40 years sevice I get 50% pension and pay quiet a lot each month. Compare that to most government employees, a lot of private pensions and you will get a shock as to 'how well off' teachers are on a pension.

 

I love my job, would never change it, ever, but keep in mind that I get holidays (that parents hate), and an OK wage set against my qualifications / time spend at Uni, but you will never hear me moaning about it, but at 70?.....................................

Edited by markm
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thank god I have signed up to take my retirement in 11 months time, it cant come soon enough :good: Ive worked like hell and paid into my pot for 44 years,and if I thought for one minute some scumbag could suddenly change the rules and dip me out of what Ive looked forward to all my working life, some local politician would be in for a nadding! sad thing is the youngsters of today (thanks to thieving low life speculators who played the banking system like poker players and the brain dead politicians who saw no need to regulate them)wont be able to join a decent final salary scheme even if they could get a job.

 

KW

Edited by kdubya
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As a teacher who has worked in a large secondary school for 6 years I can see both sides of the argument.

 

As teachers I believe we are well paid, have good conditions, job security and a solid pension. The majority of the "old" teachers I work with believe we are underpaid and over worked. Where else could they earn £35,000+ unpromoted and have 13 weeks holiday a year?

 

It is inevitable in the current climate that we will have cuts imposed on our pensions. As an example a collegue retired last year, she had worked for 27 years as a result of a having 3 kids. She retired at 60 and could reasonably be expected to live, and draw her pension, for more than 27 years. There is the problem.

 

The flip side of this is that I work from 8 am in the morning until 8:30 - 9 every night with a couple of hours break for travel, food dog etc, Monday to Thursday, I have Friday night off. I work every Sunday for 2 or 3 hours and usually a couple of days every holiday. I am also expected to do Saturday morning revision sessions from mid April until June.

 

I have seen a third of the teachers I began my career with leave the profession. As a staff in my school we work constantly to improve the exam results of our pupils yet every year when we return in September we are told by The Head and the Local Authority that it is not good enough. Results must improve etc etc.

 

As a result the majority of staff in my school, and in the profession as a whole are of the attitude of "what is the point in working so hard when we recieve very little in the way of job satisfaction?"

 

If the NUT really want to cause the government problems they should forget strike action. Every member of teaching staff should be instructed to work lets say 40 hours a week. That would bring the education system to its knees in a matter of weeks. Personally that would mean no marking at all and several lessons a week unplanned.

 

I know for a fact that I would be physically unable to teach a class and do all the related work when in my sixties.

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How big would a teachers pension built up over 30 years service need to be to match the bonuses still being paid out to bankers

 

Alternatively how many teachers pensions could theoretically be paid for life by the bonuses paid by one bank this year?

 

Why are we being brainwashed into thinking bankjing is immune to cuts or penalties?

Edited by Willxx
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Some very good points being made here, Diverd it's refreshing to hear your points, but on the point of switching employers to gain a pay rise, yes absolutely, but this is simply supply and demand and not really the point, the sacrifice of which may be job security?? As for second homes, this is something completely out of my league for one! I did a six year printing apprenticeship, have worked in the industry for 24 years and other than the directors am the top paid worker in the company I work for, I earn £26500 p.a. Pension? Second home? Dream on, I mortgaged myself to the max to get a decent home and I firmly believe I'm living in my pension, just can't afford any more.

I absolutely agree on the point about the RBS man and a £6 million pension, it's an absolute disgrace and smacks of the banking industry sticking 2 fingers up at the people that bailed them out and saying "thanks for the handout, now we'll carry on doing exactly what we want to do"!

We're getting slightly off topic here though for me, my gripe was about the guy who was complaining about work not being fun and having to work until 58, Christ, I won't have finished paying off my mortgage until I'm 61!

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Teachers are like firemen/police/miners......you knew what you were signing up for so dont moan when it happens

 

Yep, what you sign up for.... You don't sign up for wholesale changes at the whim of a government to fund all the lazy folk out there who can't be bothered to work.

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Thats just what wound me up in the first place...that guy is unreal :blink:

I have seen blokes working on building sites at 60 years old, they have no choice but to do so as they cannot afford to retire, and they hate the job. Every minute of every day, and have probably felt the same for years, just working as they have no choice.

What about all the people who have worked their whole lives at one place, then get made redundant with only the legal minimum, and no pension to speak of, 1 year before they retire?

They are the ones who can complain, along with the Police, Fire brigade, Nurses, low grade council workers...all being dumped on from a great height...and of course teachers, who without doubt have the hardest job of all, teaching kids :blink:

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Yep, what you sign up for.... You don't sign up for wholesale changes at the whim of a government to fund all the lazy folk out there who can't be bothered to work.

 

Unfortunately for people like myself who work in the real world,i have to pay to subsidise your pension.

Work out how much you pay into your pension pot,then how much you get back each year as you draw your pension,and you will see a point in your future where your pot is empty,thats where your pension becomes subsidised.

 

Stop winging,most of us work a dam sight harder,cannot afford to accumulate a pension pot to equal the one you have,do not get the sickness perks,the extended holidays etc.

 

The country is bankrupt,you can thank the politicians for that,and cuts are being made.

 

Try self employed for a while,holidays if i'm lucky,sickness pay don't make me laugh,job security non existent,regular wage ha ha.

And you want my sympathy because you can retire at least 10 years before before me.

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To be fair on our teachers, at fires, kids are little ********. There is no form of "councilling" available to us, and we are not allowed to move them on. The police are too busy to help and the little darlings are costing millions of pounds of damage every year, Remember, fires are mainly caused by 3 things, men, women and children!

 

I have fought fires for decades but would hate the thought of a season with the little devils, they are the same kids driving us mad (I have 3, thankfully too young!) in our shopping centres. I can imagine them in class with their ipods and mobiles, some coming from generations of unemployment.

 

Some are the little angels we see open eyed at a christmas tree - other are the children we see stealing and vandalising from ourt society. A quick read at the papers shows that our society has changed dramatically from when i was young.

 

When i was a lad desputes were sorted with a bop on the nose or chin and a bit of applied counciling for the head teacher.

 

now we simple knife or shoot each other, if the press is to be believed!

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I have been a teacher in inner city schools for nearly 20 years.

I was a NUT member until 2 years ago.

I went on strike (against my own feelings, but as a union member I agreed with the principles), it achieved nothing. The country was on the edge of the recession (depression??).

I defy anyone to try my job for 24 hours.

Colleagues who have retired early have generally got 'deals' from the local authority, to pay them off to allow schools to make a saving by employing younger staff.

It is a great job; discussion with my low year 10 set about whether eating Roast Chicken flavour crisps on Good Friday will ensure that you burn in hell. It has its low points; wrestling a 6'2" 15 year old to the ground last month who was about to launch himself at another pupil and cause potential serious injury. Not much fun, now i am in my 40s.

If I go early it will be at the cost of my pension.

 

Those who can - do

Those who can't, and like working with young people, and have spent time at uni to get a degree, who can put up with ever changing goal posts in education - Teach!!

Edited by ricko
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