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Ever tried lamping pigeons?


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There seems to be a presumption by some that the GL ought to be brought to the attention of shooters as a matter of course. Does that apply to everything? Who knows the laws about seatbelts and young people? What is the minimum size for a trout should you wish to keep one you caught? How many bitches of a breeding age can you keep without authority? Do hares have a close season?

 

It is the onus on each one of us to make sure that we don't break the law. Ignorance is no defence. If you go shooting you should know the relevant legislation. Simple as.

 

Our sport is under threat from all quarters - so I assume You do not think it's a good idea to get people on the right path?

 

Edit: spelling :lol:

Edited by Devon Fox
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To be honest when i had my interveiw with the gun officer he was here for 10 mins and never said anything about the genaral licence! A forum is all about askin questions and thanks for the helpfull awnsers! Now i know lamping pigeons is against the law i and others wouldnt do it! In my view i think everyone thinks i was shootin the bird as it was asleep in a tree well belive it or not i have morals and the pigeons were flying out from the trees! But like i say i now know its against the law i wouldnt be doing it again!! We all have our own veiws i respect that!

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Our sport is under threat from all quaters - so I assume You do not think it's a good idea to get people on the right path?

 

Maybe 24 years of dealing with people who ride motorbikes on footpaths and shoot air rifles in woodland without permission, and always seem to think that it is society's fault that they don't know the law makes me a little cynical. Or right, a lot cynical. But the sort of people who don't listen to their parents or teachers aren't going to take advice from anyone are they? I've just come across three anglers with over a grand's worth of tackle on a river with no licences, chub in keepnets out of season and guess what? They had no idea........... :no:

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It's illegal to shoot these as well

you need a special license for shooting them at night :hmm:

 

 

WHAT THE LICENCE PERMITS (ENGLAND)

 

(d) in relation to the killing or taking of Feral Pigeon (Columba livia) only:

 

i. to use any device for illuminating a target or any sighting device for night shooting;

ii. to use any form of artificial lighting or any mirror or other dazzling device.

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Maybe 24 years of dealing with people who ride motorbikes on footpaths and shoot air rifles in woodland without permission, and always seem to think that it is society's fault that they don't know the law makes me a little cynical. Or right, a lot cynical. But the sort of people who don't listen to their parents or teachers aren't going to take advice from anyone are they? I've just come across three anglers with over a grand's worth of tackle on a river with no licences, chub in keepnets out of season and guess what? They had no idea........... :no:

 

I can understand that!!

 

But I am being purely selfish, as I want to protect what I enjoy :good:

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It's illegal to shoot these as well

you need a special license for shooting them at night :hmm:

 

 

WHAT THE LICENCE PERMITS (ENGLAND)

 

(d) in relation to the killing or taking of Feral Pigeon (Columba livia) only:

 

i. to use any device for illuminating a target or any sighting device for night shooting;

ii. to use any form of artificial lighting or any mirror or other dazzling device.

 

Do i get an appology???? Because i read the licence and understood the content i was right i think you will find? :lol::P

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I can understand that!!

 

But I am being purely selfish, as I want to protect what I enjoy :good:

 

The point is that the GL is administered by Natural England, not the police. Police Forces are only responsible for firearms applications and subsequent monitoring. These licences involve far more than vermin shooters and it is not the police's responsibility to ensure that every applicant knows about the GL.

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and it is not the police's responsibility to ensure that every applicant knows about the GL.

 

No. It should be the responsibly of any person who intends to kill an animal on the GL, to know what is on it and how it can be legally taken.

 

In the same way that fishermen and shooters know the seasons, it should be standard practice that the GL is common knowledge to any and all shooters.

 

OP. Please don't keep apologising. (We) appreciate you've learned your lesson, so don't worry. We all make mistakes and I'm glad you've taken this on the chin and not gone off on one...!

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It's illegal to shoot these as well

you need a special license for shooting them at night :hmm:

 

 

Im sorry, but you dont

 

I regularly lamp feral pigeons for london underground

the only certification needed is entry permit (to work on lul), air rifle/safe shooting from bisley, plus appropiate method/risk assesments etc

 

NO SPECIAL LICENSE NEEDED

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I have been shooting for decades and I didn't know it was illegal to lamp birds.

I haven't done it, and can't think it would be very sucessful , but didn't know you couldn't.

I can't see why you shouldn't lamp the blasted things either. They are a very expensive pest and if they were almost wiped out to extinction so much the better as far as I am concerned. (note the "almost", I don't mind there being the odd one or two)

 

I take it your a farmer rather than a pigeon shooter,your giving the anti's plenty of ammo there suggesting we should shoot things to the brink of extinction :no:

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If you apply for a licence on the continent for any type of shooting, it is VERY expensive, and atkes a minimum 2 years, angling is also highly regulated. For a hunting licence you also need a minimum of ground (30 hectares I think, if I remember correctly), which again is very expensive, and the farmers bargain to the highest bidder, most people having to belong to a syndicate to get any hunting at all, and syndicates are very expensive too. My mates paid € 30,000.00 to € 40,000.00 a year to belong to theirs, and that was so they could have a deer or wild boar hunt once a month during season, and a driven shoot once a month during season. You have to take a two year hunting course (NOT CHEAP), and at the end also pass an exam. this keeps hunting in the proverbial rich clique area.

Do you really want to see the UK follow in these footsteps ?

Better would be to just give a copy of the GL conditions with every application, and the name of a local club or guru to help the person.

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If you apply for a licence on the continent for any type of shooting, it is VERY expensive, and atkes a minimum 2 years, angling is also highly regulated. For a hunting licence you also need a minimum of ground (30 hectares I think, if I remember correctly), which again is very expensive, and the farmers bargain to the highest bidder, most people having to belong to a syndicate to get any hunting at all, and syndicates are very expensive too. My mates paid € 30,000.00 to € 40,000.00 a year to belong to theirs, and that was so they could have a deer or wild boar hunt once a month during season, and a driven shoot once a month during season. You have to take a two year hunting course (NOT CHEAP), and at the end also pass an exam. this keeps hunting in the proverbial rich clique area.

Do you really want to see the UK follow in these footsteps ?

Better would be to just give a copy of the GL conditions with every application, and the name of a local club or guru to help the person.

 

I'm not sure where you get that information from, but it is not entirely accurate for France.

 

In France you can own pretty much any non-military firearm with little in the means of regulation. If you want to use it to hunt then you have to pass a two part exam. One part is theory and includes questions on wildlife matters, gestation periods, identification of species and their seasons, and also safety matters. If you pass that then you move onto a practical test where they put you through some scenarios to see whether you unload the gun when crossing stiles and ditches, load the correct and safe cartridges. It ends up with some clay shooting whereby red clays represent protected species.

 

The cost of the exam and test is not a lot, certainly not enough to exclude allbut the rich. What it does, or should do, is ensure that those who go hunting have a better knowledge of their quarry and gun safety and legislation matters before they venture out into the countryside with a gun. A lot of the questions posed on here would not be necessary if we adopted a similar system.

 

Once you have passed both tests you can apply for a PDC - permis de chasse or hunting licence that must be renewed annually. Holding the PDC gives you the right to shoot or hunt any non protected species, in season, as long as you are join the Chasse (hunting club) for the area or pay for sporting days at the big estates.

 

The local Chasse organise the hunting and shooting for their area. If landowners have not specifically excluded their land from hunting anyone from the Chasse can shoot or hunt on it. There are provisions such as quotas for some species. If there is a quota for deer for example the Chasse committee might distribute some of these numbers to local members. Basically they issue plastic bracelets that have to be put on the animal's leg as soon as possible after it has been shot. Being in possession of a dead deer with no bracelet is a serious offence.

 

The cost of Chasse membership and the annual PDC licence might be around 100 - 200 Euro per year and entitles the member to more hunting and shooting than they could possible cope with. There are hunts and driven game shoots including boar shoots several times a week throughout the season.

 

Strange facts about French gun / hunting laws; You can't shoot anything with an air weapon. You can't shoot rabbits with a .22LR. No electronic devices allowed in the hunt, so no rotaries, peckers, walky-talkies, etc. You can decoy woodies using live birds - (they tether a pigeon to a perch that is able to be rotated by pulling a string causing the bird to flap and attract incoming woodies. These are usually set up along with the shooting hide in the tree tops).

 

The other thing about French hunting is that they don't usuall get started until 11 am, break for lunch from 12 while around 2 when they are usually too pi$$ed to do any more hunting, so they go to the Chasse hut or hotel and drink some more.

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I'm not sure where you get that information from, but it is not entirely accurate for France.

 

In France you can own pretty much any non-military firearm with little in the means of regulation. If you want to use it to hunt then you have to pass a two part exam. One part is theory and includes questions on wildlife matters, gestation periods, identification of species and their seasons, and also safety matters. If you pass that then you move onto a practical test where they put you through some scenarios to see whether you unload the gun when crossing stiles and ditches, load the correct and safe cartridges. It ends up with some clay shooting whereby red clays represent protected species.

 

The cost of the exam and test is not a lot, certainly not enough to exclude allbut the rich. What it does, or should do, is ensure that those who go hunting have a better knowledge of their quarry and gun safety and legislation matters before they venture out into the countryside with a gun. A lot of the questions posed on here would not be necessary if we adopted a similar system.

 

Once you have passed both tests you can apply for a PDC - permis de chasse or hunting licence that must be renewed annually. Holding the PDC gives you the right to shoot or hunt any non protected species, in season, as long as you are join the Chasse (hunting club) for the area or pay for sporting days at the big estates.

 

The local Chasse organise the hunting and shooting for their area. If landowners have not specifically excluded their land from hunting anyone from the Chasse can shoot or hunt on it. There are provisions such as quotas for some species. If there is a quota for deer for example the Chasse committee might distribute some of these numbers to local members. Basically they issue plastic bracelets that have to be put on the animal's leg as soon as possible after it has been shot. Being in possession of a dead deer with no bracelet is a serious offence.

 

The cost of Chasse membership and the annual PDC licence might be around 100 - 200 Euro per year and entitles the member to more hunting and shooting than they could possible cope with. There are hunts and driven game shoots including boar shoots several times a week throughout the season.

 

Strange facts about French gun / hunting laws; You can't shoot anything with an air weapon. You can't shoot rabbits with a .22LR. No electronic devices allowed in the hunt, so no rotaries, peckers, walky-talkies, etc. You can decoy woodies using live birds - (they tether a pigeon to a perch that is able to be rotated by pulling a string causing the bird to flap and attract incoming woodies. These are usually set up along with the shooting hide in the tree tops).

 

The other thing about French hunting is that they don't usuall get started until 11 am, break for lunch from 12 while around 2 when they are usually too pi$$ed to do any more hunting, so they go to the Chasse hut or hotel and drink some more.

Germany and The Netherlands

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I agree.

 

So who's fault is it, that a newcomer doesn't know what the GL is?

 

My opinion is its the FEO not making new applicants aware of it at the interview stage of the application.

 

"So who's fault is it, that a newcomer doesn't know what the GL is?"

 

I`ll bet there`s more than a few veteran shooters out there that "walk the line" but know the GL inside out.

The main thing is the lad learned and should be encouraged to come back and ask a question again without fear of being slated.

muggins.

Edited by Muggins.
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Its not really a debatable point, its against the law and that really closes the issue, unless you want to start writing to your MP.

 

If you are caught doing it I suspect that you will lose your licence and saying that the landowner gave you permission wouldn't help, but it would almost certainly ensure he gets prosecuted.

 

 

and so he should along with the man pointing the gun!

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