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First FAC: .25 calibre PCP recommendations


Shooting Tigers
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Hi,

 

I am having my first ever F.A.C. issued in the next few weeks. One of my slots on it is for a .25 cal (not a .22) air rifle. I would like to hear from anyone that has experience or recommendations for what make, model, muzzle energy and pellet choices they have experience of so that I can make an informed choice for buying a rifle. I have searched this forum, but the search feature did not find anything on ".25" or "25 cal"

 

I am considering a Daystate Air Ranger 80 in .25 calibre, with around 40 to 60 ft.lbs muzzle energy. Has anyone got (or had) one of these, and how well did it perform? I intend to be using it for hunting, particularly for pigeons, crows, magpies and squirrels. Any ideas on what sort of accuracy and silencing I could expect from this set-up?

 

I am particularly interested in opinions from anyone that has had several .25 cal FAC rifles to compare against each other. I know the theories... I need informed opinions... :good:

 

Any advice on this one, anyone?... :hmm:

 

Cheers,

 

Rob

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The daystate air ranger80 is 80ftlb which is way way to much for shooting pigeons,squirrels etc in trees,I have a air ranger in 40ftlb .22 which is more than enough for what you want although still with that sort of muzzle velocity you have to always have a safe backstop and I wouldn't recommend firing that up into trees either! ,why do you want a 80ftlb air gun? Just out of interest? That's near enough exactly the same muzzle velocity as a rimfire!

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My Rapid was at 40ftlbs when I picked it up. Shot count was too low due to the huge air consumption and the noise rather defeated some of the objectives in having one. I turned it down to 35ftlbs and its perfect. Double the shot count, half the noise and every bit as effective. :good:

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Hi, All,

 

Thanks for the replies.

 

As far as I am aware, the Daystate Air Ranger 80 can have a muzzle energy of any value up to 80 ft.lbs. I was thinking of having it set at a lower level (40 to 60 ft.lbs.)so that I could try a range of .25 cal pellets of between 19 and 31 grains and keep the muzzle velocity sub-sonic. This would allow it to be kept quiet by a good moderator, but get the fastest, flattest trajectory out of it. If the muzzle energy causes problems, it can be re-adjusted. I just wanted to know how close I should start to the ideal setting of "just sub-sonic" with JSB King 25 grain .25 pellets.

 

I wanted an FAC air rifle so that I have a hunting rifle that I can use up into trees (birds, squirrels). It is going to be used on a remote farm with no surrounding buildings or inhabited property. I have two sub-12 ft.lb PCPs for inside barns and close-up vermin control. I will have rimfires (22LR and 17HMR) for rabbits and ground game.

 

Any opinions on this idea? :hmm:

 

Cheers,

 

Rob

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Guest cookoff013

Hi, All,

 

Thanks for the replies.

 

As far as I am aware, the Daystate Air Ranger 80 can have a muzzle energy of any value up to 80 ft.lbs. I was thinking of having it set at a lower level (40 to 60 ft.lbs.)so that I could try a range of .25 cal pellets of between 19 and 31 grains and keep the muzzle velocity sub-sonic. This would allow it to be kept quiet by a good moderator, but get the fastest, flattest trajectory out of it. If the muzzle energy causes problems, it can be re-adjusted. I just wanted to know how close I should start to the ideal setting of "just sub-sonic" with JSB King 25 grain .25 pellets.

 

I wanted an FAC air rifle so that I have a hunting rifle that I can use up into trees (birds, squirrels). It is going to be used on a remote farm with no surrounding buildings or inhabited property. I have two sub-12 ft.lb PCPs for inside barns and close-up vermin control. I will have rimfires (22LR and 17HMR) for rabbits and ground game.

 

Any opinions on this idea? :hmm:

 

Cheers,

 

Rob

 

900fps is a perfect start with any pellet

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Hi, All,

 

Thanks for the replies.

 

As far as I am aware, the Daystate Air Ranger 80 can have a muzzle energy of any value up to 80 ft.lbs. I was thinking of having it set at a lower level (40 to 60 ft.lbs.)so that I could try a range of .25 cal pellets of between 19 and 31 grains and keep the muzzle velocity sub-sonic. This would allow it to be kept quiet by a good moderator, but get the fastest, flattest trajectory out of it. If the muzzle energy causes problems, it can be re-adjusted. I just wanted to know how close I should start to the ideal setting of "just sub-sonic" with JSB King 25 grain .25 pellets.

 

I wanted an FAC air rifle so that I have a hunting rifle that I can use up into trees (birds, squirrels). It is going to be used on a remote farm with no surrounding buildings or inhabited property. I have two sub-12 ft.lb PCPs for inside barns and close-up vermin control. I will have rimfires (22LR and 17HMR) for rabbits and ground game.

 

Any opinions on this idea? :hmm:

 

Cheers,

 

Rob

Yes, if you've got a .22lr there's not much point going above 30 fpe with the air rifle as the lr will cover anything from 35ish upwards.

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Hi,

 

I am aware of "reduced" 22LR ammunition that has much lower muzzle energies, but I need a rifle that I can use into trees. The lower BC of airgun pellets is better suited to this. A 22LR bullet will retain energy at greater distances and I do not want to have to explain why I am pointing a 22 rimfire up into trees. However, I do want to get a flat trajectory from the .25, similar to what I get from my .177 airguns. A 24 grain pellet at 950 fps gives about 50 fl.lbs ME.

 

These are the sorts of numbers I have been considering. I was hoping to get a suitable set-up to give me a rifle capable of being accurate up to about 75 metres with minimal holdover/under.

 

Cheers,

 

Rob

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In trying to replicate the flight path of a .177 with a .25 you are at extremes. I think you will find that to try and get out to 70yds with even a 1" drop and staying within 1" on the way out there, your looking at 80 ftlbs! Believe me the muzzle blast, no matter what the moderator will be huge.Plus it will be approx 1400 ft per sec! As Cookoff says, 900ft-950ft/sec is pretty much regarded as the optimum air rifle pellet speed. If you stay with the .25, that will be 35ftlbs and a drop of some 4.5 inches at 70 yds on a 45 yd zero compared with 3.5 inches for the.22 at the same ft/lbs. As you are familiar with the kill ability of the .177, do you really need to be throwing a brick at the quarry? Are you sure you need to be that far from the quarry? The tallest oak trees would struggle to make 40 metres, with the average being around 25m.

 

 

If you haven't already, download chairgun and have a play. It might help you with your figures.

Edited by turbo33
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i shoot a fac theoben rapid mk-2 .25 prepared by Ben Taylor and set at 48fpe,

and using H&N Barracuda 31 grain .25 pellets is deadly accurate and devastates bunnies out to 75 yds which is my

range imit this gun with a 500cc bottle produces 60 shots no problem, in Bens words this power level with the barracuda

pellets provide the best with consistent accuracy and knockdown power, i also widely use an fac rapid mk2 .20 at 26fpe

with jsb exact .20 pellets, this is an excellent multi purpose gun i use it on bunnies, tree rats, wood pigeons.

atb brian

Edited by happyshooter
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i had a .25 rapid mk2 also, set at 64 ft lbs. As said by others the power level is far more tan what is required for tree dwelling critters, i used mine for 50 to 75 yard rabbits which was awesome, but the cost of the gun,charging gear,pellets and so on you my as well just go down the rimfire route.

 

i sold my rapid set up which funded me a second hand .22 rimmie, second hand hmr combo and a cheap 12g.. :good:

 

imo good quality airguns are way too expensive for what they are, if i where you i would just buy a .22 rimmie and a nice cheap springer for tree work like a hw or tx200.

 

if you buy a rapid at high power i would go down the fast flow route instead of messing with regs.. :yes:

 

atb 12.

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Hi,

 

I am aware of "reduced" 22LR ammunition that has much lower muzzle energies, but I need a rifle that I can use into trees. The lower BC of airgun pellets is better suited to this. A 22LR bullet will retain energy at greater distances and I do not want to have to explain why I am pointing a 22 rimfire up into trees. However, I do want to get a flat trajectory from the .25, similar to what I get from my .177 airguns. A 24 grain pellet at 950 fps gives about 50 fl.lbs ME.

 

These are the sorts of numbers I have been considering. I was hoping to get a suitable set-up to give me a rifle capable of being accurate up to about 75 metres with minimal holdover/under.

 

Cheers,

 

Rob

 

If you run a .177 at legal velocity off ticket its actually a little faster than i run .22 bis mags through my FAC rapid. Thing is the rapid is a lot flatter and takes way less wind. Basically your looking at muzzle velocity not time of flight the heavier pellet retains its speed better and drifts less. Running a .25 IMO just limits your ammo choice and availability too much but in theory could be even better than the .22 version i Run at similar speed to the std 12ft lb .177, 780 fps in my case.

forget 75mtrs with minimum hold over or under coz it aint gonna happen, it don't with a .22 subsonic from the LR which has a way better BC and travels 950-1050 fps with a 40 grn bullet (not a waisted pellet, with the dynamics of a shuttle cock)

 

Take them for what they are, not what some think they might be. you simply cannot get "safe to shoot into trees" and "flat shooting over 75 yds"

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In trying to replicate the flight path of a .177 with a .25 you are at extremes. I think you will find that to try and get out to 70yds with even a 1" drop and staying within 1" on the way out there, your looking at 80 ftlbs! Believe me the muzzle blast, no matter what the moderator will be huge.Plus it will be approx 1400 ft per sec! As Cookoff says, 900ft-950ft/sec is pretty much regarded as the optimum air rifle pellet speed. If you stay with the .25, that will be 35ftlbs and a drop of some 4.5 inches at 70 yds on a 45 yd zero compared with 3.5 inches for the.22 at the same ft/lbs. As you are familiar with the kill ability of the .177, do you really need to be throwing a brick at the quarry? Are you sure you need to be that far from the quarry? The tallest oak trees would struggle to make 40 metres, with the average being around 25m.

 

 

If you haven't already, download chairgun and have a play. It might help you with your figures.

 

Hello im new to the forum and have just read this thread and thought that there was some great advice as above.

I have 2 FAC rifles both 22ft lb both spring rifles fully done by steve pope

the .22 is a pro elite and is probably ideal set up for knock down power with a 16 grain jsb,it could not do 70 yards(not tried), perhaps 55yrd confidently but it would be

ok for shooting up trees and has tremendous hitting power at around 875 feet per second.perhaps something like this could be a possible rifle?

hw 80 is its equivalent and would be way cheaper than the daystate your looking at.i know its a spring rifle but it dosent have much recoil (my tuned 10.9ft lb 124 (.177 has more! )

just a thought

regards

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I have an Hatsan in .25 cal and it is devastating on vermin the impact shock wave just drops them stone dead. :good:

But i would think about the power though i have had pellet wobble and pellet distortion over 30 ftlb i find 25 to 30 ftlb is ideal. :good:

The range of .25 cal pellets is growing all the time i have used a few. :good:

Marksman domed 20 grain not bad at all and fairly accurate. :good:

H&N ram point pointed 27 grain very hard hitting but not very accurate at range. :good:

RWS Super hollow point 25 grain very good impact shock wave but not very accurate at range. :good:

RWS Superdomes 31 grain very accurate and very hard hitting has you would expect from superdomes i use them in .177 .22 .25. :good:

If you go for 80 ftlb i think you will have to use bullet type pellets like H&N rabbit magnums

or other solid lead type pellets and there`s not many out there. :hmm:

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The daystate air ranger80 is 80ftlb which is way way to much for shooting pigeons,squirrels etc in trees,I have a air ranger in 40ftlb .22 which is more than enough for what you want although still with that sort of muzzle velocity you have to always have a safe backstop and I wouldn't recommend firing that up into trees either! ,why do you want a 80ftlb air gun? Just out of interest? That's near enough exactly the same muzzle velocity as a rimfire!

I have a Daystate Airranger in .22 like Toms.awesome bit of kit,using AA 16gr at the minute also used Bisley mags and a few other all accurate in it.

Drop Bullet Boy a PM he has seen it in action. Terry

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  • 9 years later...

Hi Guys,

I know that this is quite an old thread. I hope this information is useful to your members. I have a large collection of spring air rifles and PCP's. I have spring air rifles up to 30ft lbs of energy and feel if you are going to have a PCP it should be over 35ft lbs. If you are going to hunt with your PCP you should use a .25cal or .30cal, which has harder hitting power and causes a bigger wound channel. I have a .25Cal Daystate Air Ranger Extreme 80 ft/lbs however I was getting 88 ft/lbs with 43grain Eun Jin pellets. Devastating on small to medium game up to 100metres and surprisingly very accurate once you get used to it. I love power so I ended up buying a Daystate Wolverine 303 with 102ft/lb, the 30 Cal is much more powerful and more effective out to further distances and also very accurate.   Even though it only has around 14 ft'lbs more energy than the Air ranger it has a bigger wound channel and therefore more effective. When hunting small game at closer distances I use my English made Webley Patriot  in .25Cal or Beeman CroMagnum  in .25Cal ( AKA Theoben Eliminator). I also have Weihrauch HW90 .22cal , HW 97 .20cal, HW80 .22Cal. I also have recently bought a Beeman Super 12 ( AKA Theoben Rapid MK1) in .25cal haven't shot it yet.

 

Regards

Jim

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That's cool .I often  like to go the other way and use the the minimum amount of energy required to hunt my prey .

So for rats 5.5 fpe is good .rabbits I like to use .177 at 11 fpe and pigeons also. Squirrels fall to a .22 cal airgun at 10 fpe .

For me this can make the hunt more enjoyable  and its certainly quieter and safer .

Ps I also have high power fac airguns .

 

 

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2 hours ago, Ultrastu said:

That's cool .I often  like to go the other way and use the the minimum amount of energy required to hunt my prey .

So for rats 5.5 fpe is good .rabbits I like to use .177 at 11 fpe and pigeons also. Squirrels fall to a .22 cal airgun at 10 fpe .

For me this can make the hunt more enjoyable  and its certainly quieter and safer .

Are your others less safe? 

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