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FIRST SPRINGER.


JohnFreeman1310
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After reading the forums for a while and searching for a pup ive finally found mine not got a name for him yet but hes 12 weeks and hes shy outside and on the lead its the first day here from the kennels thos so early days, but hopefully have the basics of retreaving by the time my fac is complete and back but any tips on training ect would be much appreciated. cheers

john

 

do you remember yours at that age?

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Lovely puppy!

 

Defo take your time, don't try and walk him straight away. He will be a more confident dog if you let him grow in confidence through his own curiosity, give him a month to get to know you and your garden. Don't do any formal training till he's 6months.

 

I'd personally not have that collar on him either, slip leads are better.

 

ATB,

Lee

Edited by lee-kinsman
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thanks pal just need these jabs sorted then i can get him outside on the long lead as weve got a nice big feild outside our house and let his confidence grow hes really unsure about the world at the moment and my beige cant take to much puppy puddles but soon as we bring me in he pees like hes holding it for the house if you have any tips you have for this would b much appreciated cheers john.

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Hi John he looks a cracking pup, ours seemed to do the same thing with holding it in for the house you just have to be persistent with it. I found using a command word when they went outside helped, say it as they are going and then lots of fuss when they are finished. Try not to say good dog or good boy afterwards though as they might link that with going, I used 'busy' for my two. To be fully house trained one of mine took about 5 days the other took a good 10-14 days which seems like a lifetime but they do get there.

 

When you take him out to the field i wouldnt bother with a long lead to start off with there is no need they stick to you like a glue normally and just practice the recall in your house giving them treats when they come back to you. It is worth getting them used to a lead though but a normal length one- i made the mistake as my springer always stayed close i didnt use a lead for the first couple of months and then when it come to putting her on one she pulled like a train- finally seemed to have sorted her now though.

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Lovely pup John. I trained my first springer/gun dog 4 years ago. I was recommended the book 'Training Spaniels' by Joe Irving. I cannot recommend it enough. I treated it as a bible and ended up with a cracking dog. Mr Irving says to stick to one source of traing tips, not bits from friends etc.. Stick to this book and you wont go wrong.

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Nice pup, hope he does well for you.

 

Get the Joe Irving book and stick by it, you could do a lot worse. IMHO don't clicker train unless you know what you are doing, timing is absolutely key and if you are learning with your dog it could become confusing for you both.

 

Wouldn't bother with a long lead when you get him out in the field by your house either, he will be want to be with you to boost his own confidence so build on that feeling rather than him feeling restrained by you or constantly connected.

 

Just a couple of thoughts.

 

Best of luck.

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Hi John,

I have to agree with WGD re the clicker. With respect to ETO her dogs are more obedience trained pets so a clicker will work for her.

I'd recommend you stick to voice command and an ACME 211 1/2 whistle it's much more suited to communicating to your dog in variety of ways in the field. One being that your dog is more likely to hear it on a very windy day when he's 50 yards out.

 

Best regards,

Lee

Edited by lee-kinsman
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Thank you all for the advise I will certainly be having a look for the book you recommend as I've asked a few guys who I have seen local used the dogs for pigeon and they dont take me serious only being 21 so I do appreciate the advice. Also Oscar is just 12 weeks so trying to let him grow in him self aswell .

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It is a joy to have a dog that handles well and responds to your comand, both for your service and the pleasure that you & dog will have from hunting together. There is some good advice from the previous posters. I would add that it is very easy to make many simple mistakes that affect the dog for all of it’s life and are almost imposble to stop once they ingrained into the dog. I made a BIG MISTAKE with the first dog that I had. I used to have a weighted dummy and throw it out far for the dog to retrieve, which it did do. “Good dog ect”. The thing that I didn’t realise was that I was teaching the dog to run in without command which I could never stop. As I used the dog with a friend on walked up it wasn’t the end of the world and overall it was a superb hunters dog. I wish that the dog was still here with me but I miss all of the dogs that I’ve had over the years.

I don’t think that it is wise to have the dog on a long run line. As stated the dog will treat you as master and will generally stay within distance but if the dog has a long line it WILL get up to running speed and at some time it will undoubtably hit the end of the line with a fair old snatch. It is better to walk the dog to the field on a slip lead and being mindfull of the road or any other thing that might be a danger, let it run free to a distance that you would want it to flush and then blow the wistle to get it’s attention and call it back. It will get used to how you work and distance and eventually work back and forth quartering at that distance. Don’t run after a dog as it will run even faster, walk in the oposite direction. The dog will then come back to be with you. Make a fuss of it. Good dog ect. It pays to have a handfull of small dog biscuits in your pocket as a reward for doing what you require. Use sparingly as if you give them all the time it wont want to go away from you and wont hunt, Don’t forget that you pup is a baby and if it has an accident on the carpet don’t shout at it, beat it or rub it’s noise in it because it is all counter productive. You don’t do that to a human baby and if it goes in the house it hasn’t had enough time to do it outside. It is YOUR FAULT. When it does go as previously stated use a command word and give it a treat for going outside.

PS. Dont lose your rag with him at any time. If it isnt happening stop and play for a while and have a think about what you are doing and what you intend to acomplish. Then have a rethink to make sure that you are not making another mistake.

Lovely dog.

Edited by fortune
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Thank you all for the advise I will certainly be having a look for the book you recommend as I've asked a few guys who I have seen local used the dogs for pigeon and they dont take me serious only being 21 so I do appreciate the advice. Also Oscar is just 12 weeks so trying to let him grow in him self aswell .

 

Plenty of time pal.

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