Jump to content

Hungarian Vizsla


Recommended Posts

Next time my dog blanks the whistle I shall claim "I must have damaged his tympanic membrane" as I am sure nobody else has a clue what it actually is also!

 

LOL, it's a bit inside its lug! Matures around six months I believe and very loud close noises can be painful prior to that hence they associate shot with pain and so the problems start.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 116
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

well I will be doing some research into the breed a bit more but at this present time I can not see why not I /we both like bigger dog an a challenge is there any other differences between the wire and short haired apart from the obviously the hair

 

Yes and no.

 

The WHV was derived from crossing the (smooth) Vizsla with a German Wire-haired Pointer back in the 1930s so is relatively new. If you believe everything that's written about the breed the Wire is slightly bigger and heavier in bone. That, however, should be taken as a rough generalisation. I've seen some small, skinny, fluffy coated 'wires' that I wouldn't touch with a bargepole, but on the flip side there are also some lovely big and typy 'smooths' that look superb!

 

In terms of temperament and working ability I think if you go to a proper 'working' rather a 'show' kennel you'll find no difference between the working ability of either breed, so it would really be down to your personal choice. I've just always loved the Wires and in a straight choice between two equals the Wire wins, but I'd sooner have a nice 'smooth' over a poor Wire anyday - Quality always comes first in my book.

 

I've got Roy Bebbington's book on the WHV and he is very passionate about the breed. His dogs are the correct type/coat and his website is here: >>Gonegos<<. I'll definitely be knocking on his door when I'm looking for another pup! Another website to look at is >>Zöldmáli<< who, without doubt, breed some of the best Wires in the world and they have some good tips and pics of them working.

Edited by Paul T
Link to post
Share on other sites

6 months or younger I would be concerned about damaging their tympanic membrane but there is a big difference between shooting clays with a dog next to you and letting them hear relatively close shot at a clay ground. I've never gone down the clay ground route but all mine hear shot by the time they are about 8 months and once they have heard it I like to get them close to it quite quickly, ideally within one session. But then I purposely avoid dogs where the breeding is likely to make them very soft.

 

It really bugs me people taking dogs claying and having them stand effectively on peg. It will damage their hearing as we all know and is so pointless it's ridiculous. Far better to introduce them slowly in the field if you do it slowly and with game about they have their mind on other things. Mine usually start either with the Hmr rabbiting or on a lead out beating after the traditional blanks and watching from a distance. Our local clay ground you see the same dogs sitting there by the peg with hundreds of shots close by and it has to be damaging them

Link to post
Share on other sites

I always started to introduce gun shot, between the age of 6-8 month, depending on the dog.

Normally, for the first time, I would ask a friend that knows my dog, to walk in frot of me and let a shot off at 100-150 yards, to see the reaction of the dog, then I will take it from there, depending on the dog reaction.

Personally I would take a dog to the clay ground, I would introduce it in stages and distances.

 

Ment to say NOT TAKING

Edited by Highbird70
Link to post
Share on other sites

but why damage its hearing for the sake of letting it watch you shoot clays?

 

its one thing taking a dog to introduce to gunshot and from a distance but we get people with trained dogs there every week, ridiculous in my opinion having them stand right by the cage

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lovely looking dogs :good:

 

I don't agree with the clay ground training either. From a young age I slowly introduced my lab with loud noises going from dropping his food bowls to one of my sons cap gun, to a friend firing a dummy launcher. My lab is now 11 months and not gun shy :good:

Edited by WelshAndy
Link to post
Share on other sites

"The Vizsla is a Hunt Point Retrieve breed, so you will have a job on to supress the natural instinct to hunt, and it might be a torment to force the dog to sit in a hide for hours when centuries of selective breeding have created a hunting machine"

 

 

I totally disagree with that statement, But apparerently i trained my dogs all wrong. I introduce them to the gun at 6 months, via the clays and onto game at a year, rough shooting regularly and was doing her first formal shoots at 2 years old, she is just as happy sitting in a hide as she is sitting on a peg, and I fail to see what the difference sitting on a peg is to sitting in a hide, and she often gets a lot more action in a pigeon hide.

 

The bottom line is shes three now and lives for being out in the field, she is happy doing any of the disciplines, shell retrieve ducks from ponds and rivers, sit in a hide and go out to retrieve when she hears a thud, I can stop her chasing hares and foxes, shes is brilliant at flushing pheasants and retrieves anything I tell her to.

 

Wether they were designed for for hpr or not, they are just as happy doing any of it as long as shes in the field and shes with me,

 

As well as all that she is a great family dog loved by all that meet her and has melted the hearts of many pigeon watch members over the last few years.

 

Shes a privilage to have.

 

 

I have 4 others too, Dexter is 2.5 and is now reaching the levels that purdey is at, I have a year old Storm that is coming on in leaps and bounds and 2 pups(boris and Mila) i just bought in from Hungary in November, they are also coming along well, both have been introduced to the gun at 6 and 7 months. I cant see the point of waiting any longer, if you spend a year or 18months traing a dog that is gun shy you have wasted 18month imo.

 

If you want a dog and dont want the usual spaniel (nothing wrong with them just not my cup of tea) or a Lab, or the other awful crosses that are out there, then you wont go fgar wrong with a viszla!!!

 

I quite agree with all the above. My Munsterlander is happy doing anything she's asked to do and has been out working with the older one since she was five months old. In a hide she will just lay down until she hears a shot.

Edited by Pidge
Link to post
Share on other sites

Have u thought about either a flat coat or golden retriever or even a irish water spaniel, all would probably be more suited for wot ur doing althou u'd have to look around for a working line but still a few around,esp the goldies often a few qualify for the IGL most years.

 

If ur heart is set on a HV then possibly join an HPR training club( even before u get ur dog) or go along to a field trial/spring counting test to meet and speak to local HPR owners, also speak to as many breeders as u can and ask plenty questions. With HPR's generally there can be a massive differnce in temperment between lines or individuals of the same breed. Also ask any weaknesses that breed tends to have (they all have them) some hpr breeds are not always great in water (sometimes more so the smooth haired breeds, gsp, wiem,hv) the smooth breeds also tend to struggle with the cold more, althou that might not affect u if ur down south.Finally some hpr's do tend to be more vocal than ur average traditional gundog breed

Link to post
Share on other sites

This was my HWV at 5 Months

 

Cragwood118a.jpg

 

Cragwood042.jpg

 

xmas12014.jpg

 

She is now almost 8 months and coming on well with her training, she is alot more steady and trainable than i thought, having trained GWP and spaniels before, she has more spirit than my lab, but is not far off her when it comes to being steady.

I will use her as a rough shooting dog, pigeon shooting and on my driven shoot, i also like to bush rabbits with my dogs to the lurcher, i know you shouldnt but it excellent fun and keeps the dogs fit in the summer.

All in all, so far i am very impressed with this breed and like Baz said, i think the main thing is they just want to be with you, whatever your sport.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Right, here's my "two penneth"

 

Rough Shooting Dog- To be honest, Sedge is great he knows what to do and is a pleasure to shoot over. He has a tendency to roam a little too far but that is the nature of the breed and I correct him as much as needed. He can work all day and the next. Never worked a breed that has a nose like the HWV, many a time has proved my buddies wrong when he flushes something from the undergrowth. ( shows how many birds are potentially missed). Retrieves great and is soft mouthed. Has a tendency to run in but that is purely my training and i am working on it.

Pigeon Shooting - This is coming on, attention span and ability to just chill out are starting to come. He's 3 years old and is starting to understand sitting in a hide is supposed to be "relaxing"!. I have no issues with this, as I say, he's only young and patience is slowly coming. He lets me know when he's bored and we have a stroll, adjust the decoys or I do a bit of training. I view this as part of the day out and the boredness is getting less and less each time.

Wildfowling- I am really choosey on his morning / evening flights. If its really cold he stays at home. Sitting in a cold wet ditch for hours on end really tests his patience and he gets cold ( I use a neoprene jacket and this has been a great help). He is not a wildfowling dog but on a mild day he is great company, he swims like a dream and will happily retrieve duck and goose. But like I say, I pick my days

Peg Dog - Fine, bit more training and he'll be there

Beating the line - Brilliant, (he won't crash into cover - just points and lets the nutter Spaniels go charging in !)

House Pet - As a family, this was probably the most important aspect in choosing this breed. I / we couldn't ask for more, soft, loving and docile around the house, lies next too my daughter all day long if i'd let him and they are the best of friends.

 

Overall this is a great breed, as with all dogs...you get out what out put in. I can't recommend the breed highly enough, fits in and suits our lifestyle better than I could have imagined

 

 

 

wildfowling

post-25426-0-53586900-1360993529_thumb.jpg

post-25426-0-08742200-1360993655_thumb.jpg

Edited by BellySlater
Link to post
Share on other sites

great looking pictures, I wonder if most of the negative comments are because its not the normal dog to have ie Lab , Spaniel etc??

like I have previousely said I am not rushing into this AS i have a bit of work todo at home then I will be looking at getting a dog the type of dog will basicly come down to two things a breed we both like and one that can do the job(s) I would like

Link to post
Share on other sites

great looking pictures, I wonder if most of the negative comments are because its not the normal dog to have

 

No mate, its because most HPRs are rubbish. A good one is worth its weight in gold but they are few and far between.

Link to post
Share on other sites

No mate, its because most HPRs are rubbish. A good one is worth its weight in gold but they are few and far between.

But is it actually the dogs or the trainers? many don't seem to understand how they are supposed to work so training them not to do this is always going to be an issue
Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of people get a hpr for the way it looks not what it does. Then they try and make a square leg fit in a round hole. Just look at some of the recent threads on here. You don't get a two seat sports car to take you,four mates, guns,dogs, etc down through the wood down rutted tracks do you. But some do that with their choice of breed because it looks good!!!!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it because they are training pointers for beating or to use as peg dogs?

I've not seen a springer or lab who would hunt and point like my GWP does.

To be fair he could be a lot better if I'd put more time in and had more training knowledge but second time round will be a different matter.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I completely agree many buy an HPR because of the way it looks and then try and make it fill a retrievers role. I also think people buy HPRs based on the idealised view that it is perfect rough shooters dog... in some instances it may be but in most instances that, for me, is still a spaniel.

 

My comment is based on having seen and shot over a reasonable number of HPRs of various breeds and if they were spaniels you would put their performances down to **** breeding. A lot of show stock ends up in the shooting field where HPRs are concerned, and although they are held up as a gundog where dual purpose is still a reality, the reality as far as some of the dogs I have seen are concerned is that breeding for success in the show ring must have diluted some of their hunting ability or drive.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lets face it, most dogs on shoots in the uk are very poorly trained. You see it on forums like this one, "my dog runs in" " my dogs doesn't stop" "my dog hunts too wide" etc etc etc. What then ends up is the dog is left at home because it is less hassle than taking it out. Then the dog is bred from, because the owner wants to keep a pup and train it correctly this time, then more poorly bred dogs enter the market.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd agree totally with the last 4 or 5 post's, HPR's a a laibility waiting to happen on a beating/picking up line or even on a rough shoot because thet have been slectively bred for hundreds of years to work large areas of little game/scent and we think we can work them like a lab or spaniel. Like others have said a square peg round hole..But there is nothing finer than seeing a dog really going for it on a grouse moor and coming onto point, infact i'd say it is the highest level of gundog work

 

Most of the hpr's i've seen are pretty poor it takes a very very good dog/handler to be at the level of an average 'normal gundog', i've been lucky enough to train/work with a couple of FTW/FTCH hpr's and good as they are they are still not much better than a well trained lab at normal gundog work. Also they are generally harder to train and slower to mature, as i've said before unless u want a dog to point (and in many cases u don't want a rough shooting dog to point) there is no way i'd consider 1

 

For me hpr's may tick a lot off boxes, but i'd say they are reasonably poor at a lot of things too; jack of all trades master of none. I sort of ***** my dogs strength's and weakness's more by scoreing the boxes and for me a Lab is severely underated; yes it might not point (althou some american lines do!) but it will do everything from deer to wildfowling and even it's weaker points will still do reasonably well. Every dog/breed has it's pro's and con's but for me the lab even the lab's weakest is still a decent enough level for most people

Link to post
Share on other sites

The funny thing is from experience a HPR is less of a liability in a beating line than most traditional breeds simply because they tend to stop on game and not run in, like DH I've not seen a dog hunt like them and from experience there is only one dog keen to go all day on our shoot and not stop and thats my GWP out works spaniels no problem . The best reason for one is to have a multi purpose dog I trade a slightly less reliable retrieve with a very keen hunter and one who is great when out with a rifle and very nice to shoot over with a shotgun. For my shooting that is a heap of foxing and lamping, certain amount of deer beating or shooting every week during the season she can do the lot, the only thing she isn't keen on is sitting on peg but thats come on hugely this season from being out a lot. You certainly won't get a spaniel sitting under a high seat quietly and be keen on confronting an injured deer or fox. Or sitting in a truck while lamping in case you can't find a fox. The main reason they are becoming more popular is due to more people having a dog for deer and finding they are quite good fun in other aspects of their shooting.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lets face it, most dogs on shoots in the uk are very poorly trained. You see it on forums like this one, "my dog runs in" " my dogs doesn't stop" "my dog hunts too wide" etc etc etc. What then ends up is the dog is left at home because it is less hassle than taking it out. Then the dog is bred from, because the owner wants to keep a pup and train it correctly this time, then more poorly bred dogs enter the market.

 

Top Comment.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...