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Anouther 17 Blows up


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This is a very relevent point!

I know what to do because it has happened several times in Both my HMR's, as already said i carry a cleaning rod, someone less experienced may just get the bolt closed and i dread to think of the worse case.

 

Would it be worth a Sticky on this subject in the rifle section for new shooters researching HMR ?

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This is a very relevent point!

I know what to do because it has happened several times in Both my HMR's, as already said i carry a cleaning rod, someone less experienced may just get the bolt closed and i dread to think of the worse case.

 

Would it be worth a Sticky on this subject in the rifle section for new shooters researching HMR ?

 

I had a problem with using Privi Partizan ammo in .243 but a sticky for all calibers might be OTT

 

Any shooter needs to be aware and know what steps to take for any shotgun misfire/issue and rifle misfire/issue ...... that might make a better sticky

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This is now the fourteenth occasion since Jan 2014 that I've heard of an HMR blowing up. Thirteen of those have been through this forum and the Stalking Directory. One was an acquaintance of mine.

.

The design of the cartridge has never sat well with me - too much bearing surface for too small a bullet in too small a case to launch it reliably - I will never buy one. I'm sure billions of rounds have been fired perfectly safely, but there's something about it which for me just doesn't add up. You look at a .243 or a .308 round and you think "yeah - that'll work: primer meets powder meets bullet". I never get that feeling looking at an HMR. Except for the above, I can't explain it.

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I had a problem with using Privi Partizan ammo in .243 but a sticky for all calibers might be OTT

 

Any shooter needs to be aware and know what steps to take for any shotgun misfire/issue and rifle misfire/issue ...... that might make a better sticky

Agreed,

although a lot of new shooters will go to rimfire and gain valuable experience before progressing to C.F,

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A first time shooter? They should at least learn something before being let loose with something like a gun, surely?

 

No different than a shotgun with mud rammed into the barrel? Carrying two guages of cartridge, one of which can drop down to the cone. Using magnum cartridges in a 65mm chambered game gun. Nitro cartridges in a black powder proofed gun.

 

Seems to me most have been blown up by the operator ignoring a known problem. Agreed, the risk should not be as high as it appears but anyone who chambers another round after a misfire is actually inviting trouble.

 

As an aside, if the big naval guns have a misfire the turret is sealed with the crew inside for one or two hours before any further action is contemplated. Talk about sweating it out! They have a large cordite charge and an exposive shell in the chamber, of course. But they definitely don't take chances when a misfire occurs.

 

RAB

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A first time shooter? They should at least learn something before being let loose with something like a gun, surely?

 

No different than a shotgun with mud rammed into the barrel? Carrying two guages of cartridge, one of which can drop down to the cone. Using magnum cartridges in a 65mm chambered game gun. Nitro cartridges in a black powder proofed gun.

 

Seems to me most have been blown up by the operator ignoring a known problem. Agreed, the risk should not be as high as it appears but anyone who chambers another round after a misfire is actually inviting trouble.

 

As an aside, if the big naval guns have a misfire the turret is sealed with the crew inside for one or two hours before any further action is contemplated. Talk about sweating it out! They have a large cordite charge and an exposive shell in the chamber, of course. But they definitely don't take chances when a misfire occurs.

 

RAB

Do they still use cordite?

 

The things you say are no different are errm very different! Your list contains potential operator mistakes. Not manufacturing issues or faulty goods!

 

U. :)

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''Do they still use cordite?''

 

U,

 

I don't know, but doubt the precautions after a misfire are lessened. My information is aged, I admit, but from the father of his son who was part of the loading crew sitting in the turret sweating!

 

Guns don't often explode spontaneously; they need some human input. Even the experienced can make a mistake - the untrained rather more likely. Perhaps people shooting these small calibres don't notice the lack of recoil such as one would with a far heavier projectile? Perhaps all guns should have a recoil operated safety system installed?

 

Accidents are defined as events which could not be foreseen. Reloading after a known misfire should not really come under that umbrella, excepting some very rare situations. Let's be having the statistics of guns blowing up or being blown up - there being a subtle difference between the two. I suspect the truth is far closer to operator error than faulty guns. One ignores the warnings at ones peril.

 

RAB

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I've shot a couple of thousand rounds, several makes, never had one not go off. However have had split cases, they still go bang.

 

They may well go BANG but the necks ain'y supposed to split on any round. Thats the idea of using brass. it is a maliable metal and it is used because it can move without splitting unless it has not been annealed correctly.

Accidents are defined as events which could not be foreseen. Reloading after a known misfire should not really come under that umbrella,

I suspect the truth is far closer to operator error than faulty guns. RAB

 

As an aside, if the big naval guns have a misfire the turret is sealed with the crew inside for one or two hours before any further action is contemplated. Talk about sweating it out! They have a large cordite charge and an exposive shell in the chamber, of course. But they definitely don't take chances when a misfire occurs.

 

RAB

Does the navy have BIG guns anymore where there are turret crew? I thought that all of the guns were now small single barrel auto load jobbies. they look like a big dustbin with a single barrel poking out.

Edited by fortune
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''Does the navy have BIG guns anymore ...''

 

Probably not the Royal Navy, and I was not specifying any particular navy (but still the possibility for any smaller out-dated navy. Maybe I should have said ''used to''. Info was a bit old - left that place of work nearly thirty years ago!

 

As an aside, I think you are quoting things as attributed to me when they have not been posted by me. Needs tidying up to avoid the inaccuracies, please.

 

I daresay, back in those days the gunners would have noticed a certain lack of recoil if there was a misfire.!

 

My main point was one of predictable outcomes if warning signs are ignored.

 

RAB

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I think the .17 HMR vents back and blows the magazine off, rather than blows up the barrel. I've had this happen once in about 1000 rounds, I thought it was a misfire but ejected an empty case so inspected the bore...........nothing, so I don't know what that was, enough primer to push the round out of the barrel perhaps?

A friend has had this happen loads of times, he eventually returned the ammo he bought.

 

I've had plenty of split cases but they all go off, I like the HMR, it is deadly accurate and I admit i'm struggling to get through my ammunition as it's generally 1 round = 1 rabbit. They don't kick themselves back to the burrow after the HMR has dealt with 'em <_<

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As an aside, if the big naval guns have a misfire the turret is sealed with the crew inside for one or two hours before any further action is contemplated. Talk about sweating it out! They have a large cordite charge and an exposive shell in the chamber, of course. But they definitely don't take chances when a misfire occurs.

 

RAB

Shades of the Gibralter 100 tonne gun. Talk about a human cannonball!

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As already posted, the only problem I have had is with the Hornady blue tipped I have had no problem with red tipped other than an occasional split case after firing..

I have faith in my rifle not being at fault,it has been acknowledged by Hornady I believe that they have a problem with the necking down of the cases and hope they are doing something about it.

Can anyone else identify which round has been at fault from their experiences.

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Mine was a Hornady blue tip, my friend had this happen several times with Hornady red tip. He had bought the ammo at the Fenland Country fair at a reduced price but had no end of problems with it and returned it to the dealer.

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Mine was a Hornady blue tip, my friend had this happen several times with Hornady red tip. He had bought the ammo at the Fenland Country fair at a reduced price but had no end of problems with it and returned it to the dealer.

which one did your friend take back? red, blue tip or both of them

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