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Anyone work with kids with learning difficulties?


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Get him a dog :)

Echo LG it does sound a bit like Aspergers - we have CAMHS here for children with difficulties who will come out and assess on the parents' request - is there an equivalent in England I wonder?

We've got 5, he had a German shepherd for his tenth birthday as my partner thought that would bring him out of his shell

CAMHS are brilliant, they work with parents and schools, I've had first hand experience with them. Maybe think about getting in touch with your local ones, Russ?

I'll look into thanks

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Yep, have to agree, perhaps Autism

 

Now before you get too pee'd off, Autism is a gift, he is on the scenic route, he is taking a different path, not a better or a worse path, just a scenic route.

Tap into what he wants to do, Xbox, then play xbox with him [in moderation!!!]

Soldering an electronics kit.....then solder with him

Space museum... then have a day out with him

Etc etc etc

 

If he has no friends, YOU need to be his FRIEND, don't push him too much, remember , you are on the scenic route, its a slower road :)

 

You do need to find some one to guide you, try via the school, there are loads of help groups/charities

 

Autistic people seem to be good at spotting other autistic people so a group will help with like minded people and may help make friends

 

Remember his feelings, he probably isn't having the best of times, so you can make a fantastic difference :good:

 

Oh..... and don't forget............., your'e not on your own, and he's not the only one :yes:

If there is something wrong with him I'll embrave it and encourage all the more, if he's just being a loner then all I can do is limit his time on the computer and encourage him to do more. It's hard though as he's not my son there's only so much I can say and without the backing of my partner my hands are tied.

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Chris, My Son, has autism. Aspergers to be precise! As well as other issues that are not relevant to your post, so I will stick with the OQ.

 

Judging by the concerns you have, I would say there is a high chance he has Autism. If he prefers his own company, spends time on the computer, and has difficulty showing emotion. Then I would say keep going at the Doc. Tell them your not happy and want to see a specialist. If they refuse, go above their heads.

 

Emotions are hard to understand. Chris got wrong for laughing during a educational video. There was a girl crying and he thought she was laughing. There are problems understanding the basic emotional responses, and in showing emotions. The lack of interaction with peers is another possible sign. Repetition of daily things like clockwork can also be a sign of autism. You change their routine and they get annoyed Is another. Self harming, or in some cases a recital of daily events "word for word" in their rooms talking to themselves.

 

A lot of doctors are not qualified to offer an opinion on wether or not a person in Autistic. They should listen to your concerns, and arrange an appointment to see a specialist in th field.

 

Autistic children can be anywhere on the spectrum. High function to low function. Brilliant in mind to not very clever. Act older than their years. Think other children are stupid for doing childish things. Very easy to upset if you interfere in their daily routine.

 

Above all, regardless of the issues,they still require "and deserve" love and support where ever needed!

 

Chris has been a little shut at times,but I wouldn't change a think. He has enriched my life,and made me a better person.

Edited by Lord Geordie
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Chris, My Son, has autism. Aspergers to be precise! As well as other issues that are not relevant to your post, so I will stick with the OQ.

Judging by the concerns you have, I would say there is a high chance he has Autism. If he prefers his own company, spends time on the computer, and has difficulty showing emotion. Then I would say keep going at the Doc. Tell them your not happy and want to see a specialist. If they refuse, go above their heads.

Emotions are hard to understand. Chris got wrong for laughing during a educational video. There was a girl crying and he thought she was laughing. There are problems understanding the basic emotional responses, and in showing emotions. The lack of interaction with peers is another possible sign. Repetition of daily things like clockwork can also be a sign of autism. You change their routine and they get annoyed Is another. Self harming, or in some cases a recital of daily events "word for word" in their rooms talking to themselves.

A lot of doctors are not qualified to offer an opinion on wether or not a person in Autistic. They should listen to your concerns, and arrange an appointment to see a specialist in th field.

Autistic children can be anywhere on the spectrum. High function to low function. Brilliant in mind to not very clever. Act older than their years. Think other children are stupid for doing childish things. Very easy to upset if you interfere in their daily routine.

Above all, regardless of the issues,they still require "and deserve" love and support where ever needed!

Chris has been a little shut at times,but I wouldn't change a think. He has enriched my life,and made me a better person.

If I'm honest im feeling a little guilty because im always at him because I want him to come out of himself and if he has a disorder I can help him. Me and my partner have fell out tonight over it as she thinks I'm attacking her. She also thinks there's something wrong but doesn't want him labelled as she thinks it'll draw unwated attention towards him.

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Could he not just have some sort of addiction to the xbox and has some sort of withdrawal symptoms from being away from it?

If it was me I would wean him of the xbox at least out of his room. Or try and get him to go round his friends house and play it with him at least he gets some interaction.

 

I do think games consoles play a big part in this sort behaviour and probably later in life some sort of depression.

 

Or you could try this

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Could he not just have some sort of addiction to the xbox and has some sort of withdrawal symptoms from being away from it?

If it was me I would wean him of the xbox at least out of his room. Or try and get him to go round his friends house and play it with him at least he gets some interaction.

 

I do think games consoles play a big part in this sort behaviour and probably later in life some sort of depression.

 

Or you could try this

errrr...........

think you might have missed the point here :no:

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