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Old(er) gun finish - Browning B25

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I have a B25 from 1975 -- upon inspection from quite a few people, it seems it's on it's original finish. Glossy. Hard as nail. Almost no marks on it. Can't be just oil...

 

Now I've seen a recent browning (a year old) with bumps, dents, marks and so on right into the wood. Sure, some of them might 'lift up' with steam, but what amazes me is that my B25 is nearly pristine, the finish is more or less bulletproof, part from a bit of wear at the top.

 

So, what finish did they use? it's not oil, it's not 'varnish' -- it's not acrylic, and it's not nitrocellulose (as it would have obvious signs, like my guitars).

 

 

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An oil finish can become very hard after a few years . Lots of handling can make an oil finish very shiny .the natural oil in hands can add to the lustre on gun stocks . I would have thought it would have to be an oil or varnish if it is original .

 

Harnser

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One of my Winchester 101's has a hard gloss finish, as does my contemporary 1500 XTR. I'm assuming it's varnish.

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From a 1938 brochure they termed the stock finish back then as 'high lustre'. I assume this would have been attained from lacquer of sorts.

 

My 1980's B25/B5 has a Canadian walnut stock and for the life of me I cannot determine if it's oiled or varnish. It's a silk finish so not gloss but i'ts very hard.

Edited by B25Modelman

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Polyurethane finish was around in the 70s and it was different from the modern types in being near indestructible.

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I think it will be a laquer or varnish finish as the time to oil them would be reserved for the high end guns. Back in the 80's there was non of this you can't have such and such in paints and varnishes, they could formulate them how ever they liked.

Edited by figgy

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Lower grade B25's had a hard gloss finish that was tough and durable . Bit of a swine to get off and I would recommend scraping and sanding rather than the paint stripper method if removing . Having done dozens of these high gloss finish strip off and oil finish jobs . It is also worth mention that in some cases there as an "undercoat" which was the colour so the stock may be very white underneath .

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I had a 80's say over and under with this type of finish. Two tins of nitromors later and I had to scrape it off. It softened slightly went cloudy and when rinsed off hardened again. Pig to strip but worth it in the end.

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Dear sirs, I am about to buy a special gun: A B25 A1 Super Trap 80. Have only seen pictures and cannot wait to get it. However, can anyone tell me what signs of wear I should look out for? 

 

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Any play in the action, take the forend off and shake the gun see if any movement between the face. Any wear on the ejectors , check for putting in the barrels and any bulges or ring bulging.

If your not sure get the gun inspected by a dealer or gunsmith.

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Pretty sure it’s varnished. I have a browning auto 5 from 1962 that’s got a hard shiny finish very hardwearing but shines like a shiny thing in the field. Keep thinking about getting it stripped and refinished but don’t want to change the original look. I’ll post some pics up when I get home to see if it’s the same.  

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Dear sirs, I am about to buy a special gun: A B25 A1 Super Trap 80. Have only seen pictures and cannot wait to get it. However, can anyone tell me what signs of wear I should look out for? 

Rust / pitting in the barrels and chambers. Splits in the forend woodwork.

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5 hours ago, Stein Tjelta said:

Dear sirs, I am about to buy a special gun: A B25 A1 Super Trap 80. Have only seen pictures and cannot wait to get it. However, can anyone tell me what signs of wear I should look out for? 

 

Also to add to gordon's list check the position of the top lever when closed. When you are looking down at it if it is to the right when closed you are ok, if it is to the left the locking bolt might require welding or replacing depending on how worn it is. 

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might be "polyarmourmed"....the used to coat criket bats with it back in time for tea

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On ‎14‎/‎04‎/‎2016 at 14:09, Gunman said:

Lower grade B25's had a hard gloss finish that was tough and durable . Bit of a swine to get off and I would recommend scraping and sanding rather than the paint stripper method if removing . Having done dozens of these high gloss finish strip off and oil finish jobs . It is also worth mention that in some cases there as an "undercoat" which was the colour so the stock may be very white underneath .

+1 on this.     or you could flat it back 6000 wet and dry with some soapy water as a lubricant then buff to a high quality finish with  g10/ brasso / silver polish 

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On ‎15‎/‎07‎/‎2019 at 23:09, Saltings said:

+1 on this.     or you could flat it back 6000 wet and dry with some soapy water as a lubricant then buff to a high quality finish with  g10/ brasso / silver polish 



sorry 2000 wet and dry then polish

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It was a varnish made by du-pont ,they used it on ten pins and bowling alleys as far as I know gun woodwork was dipped.

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