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Beretta 692 - Epic Self Destruction


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I shot Beretta's for about 20yrs with no problems. Bought a 695 and it went back after about 3 weeks as it would not recock the 2nd barrel.

It came back and was fine but i pxd it for a Browning Ultra xs pro as for some reason Beretta's don't seem to fit me as good as a Browning does.

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For the last 12 or so years Beretta has been run by accountants and the reality is you can't chisel every last penny out of a relatively low volume product like a shotgun without sacrificing a degree of manufacturing integrity and product quality. It may be that a number of posters on here have trouble free 692s but they are as rare as hen's teeth on the registered sporting scene. Still a good number of 682s and DT10s but Beretta have shot themselves in the foot several times with the 69x family and the early DT11s.

They have handed the baton to other makers who produce guns that don't fall apart or develop irritating problems like sticky ejectors.

Browning, Blaser and especially CG have a lot to thank the Beretta bean counters for.

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I bought this 692 in December 18 and it has performed faultlessly up until this incident.

I took it into the gun shop where I purchased it from on Tuesday morning and received excellent service, they went to fix it on the spot (free of charge) but,  returned 10 mins later  to tell me they didn’t have the correct screw/bolt and that they’d already placed the order for the part to be delivered and that I’d get a call Thursday or Friday to collect. 
 

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3 hours ago, oldypigeonpopper said:

Hello, I would say that is just metal fatigue ? ( Stock bolt ) Reference the first post 

It's a well documented problem which is nothing to do with the stock bolt.

About 12/13 years ago the powers at Beretta decided on a cost saving exercise. They set about doing away with outsourcing by manufacturing everything in house and trimming costs wherever possible. Unfortunately, the quality control department at the time seems to have got trimmed as well!

With the SV10 which has the same action as the gen 1 692, they decided that only one small setscrew was needed to hold the trigger group to action body. However, they also made it with a sort of cross between a hook and a spigot to locate the trigger group to the action so that the little setscrew only had to hold it in position. For the 692 they somehow decided that it wouls be alright to replace the spigot with a straight tongue and just use the one little  setscrew to hold the trigger group in place. A bit poor IMO but more or less okay as long as the screw stayed tight - unfortunately in some cases it didn't - and the net result is what you see in the pics above.

The (cough)"fix" was to use a drop of Loctite, and everyone with any 69X family gun more than a couple of years old would be wise to get theirs checked out.

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1 hour ago, London Best said:

A product of the ‘throw-away society’.

Once upon a time you bought a gun and it lasted for three or four generations.

Yes well said my aya no 3 magnum 40 years old build to last immaculate 

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6 hours ago, London Best said:

A product of the ‘throw-away society’.

Once upon a time you bought a gun and it lasted for three or four generations.

I'd bet my socks that Beretta's bean counters have cost the company far more in lost sales than any savings achieved by chiselling costs to boost the bottom line. They've lost a huge number of customers, including me, forever.

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6 hours ago, London Best said:

A product of the ‘throw-away society’.

Once upon a time you bought a gun and it lasted for three or four generations.

You still can! Not all guns made yesteryear were made to last forever.

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11 minutes ago, DUNKS said:

Not all guns made yesteryear were made to last forever.

My old muzzle loader was made 210 years ago - and still quite usable (flint originally converted to percussion).  My godfather (who left it to me) use to shoot grouse over a pointer with it as recently as maybe 1990s.

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On 10/09/2020 at 08:03, TIGHTCHOKE said:

And will you have full confidence in the repaired gun or sell it on?

That’s a very good question Tightchoke, one that I unfortunately can’t answer with a definitive.

I love the gun, I get on well with it and think it was a good buy at the time of purchase. I will admit that I have lost some confidence in the gun and shall see how that progresses. I don’t want to be worrying (causing my shooting to suffer) every time I use the gun and if that creeps in then I shall sell (providing it is safe to do so)  and replace. My confidence in what I believed to be an excellent brand has also been knocked  but I don’t think I will let that taint my overall view of them.  I’m going to continue to shoot the 692 on a last chance basis, if I have any more issues  with it then it will be farewell as I’m not willing to put myself or anyone that I shoot with/around in danger. 

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