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    I’m sure you are all familiar with this, as described by Malcom Gladwell.  Well, I think it is absolutely correct.

    Next time you are at a shoot, without being too obvious, ascertain who(m) has been shooting the longest, and if it’s any where near this, bet on them.  Drinks all round!

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    Was an interesting theory but it seems to be superseded now...

    http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/10000-hour-rule-wrong-really-master-skill/

    I struggled with the 10,000 hours as it applied to shooting.  Say you're shooting a 100 bird clay shoot over 1.5 hours, what is the actual time  - to be taken into account - when the process of actual shooting could be anything from a couple of seconds to a minute or so per clay - depending on just how much you take into account when planning the shot(s)?

    Say the time spent shooting per clay is 5 seconds per shot - as far as gaining experience/learning is concerned (and of course you may have wildly different views of this time), that's only 500 seconds per 100 bird shoot - that's about 8.3 mins per shoot.  Divide that into 10,000 hrs and you'll be doing a lot of shooting to learn and master your sport. :yahoo:

     

     

    Edited by Glenshooter

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    Hmm I shoot considerably better than many people who've been shooting for 20 years. I've been shooting slightly over 2 years. Heck, my wife (who shoots a lot less than I do) ALSO shoot considerably better than many people we meet who've been shooting for a lot longer.

    It's not time, it's how you spend the time. For any activity, you can either blast away, do no introspection and declare that 'practice will make perfect' -- or you can go shoot, then sit down and figure out what you did right, and what you did wrong, and try to understand why you did wrong. And then think about it.

    Like many other activity requiring hand/head coordination, a lot of the 'learning' is done offline, in bed, or talking, and definitely NOT doing the activity in question. Musical instrument playing is like that; you can do heaps and bounds *between* practice sessions, even on holidays sometime away from your instrument because your brain is figuring stuff out for you... that is, if you are *dedicated* to it. I you assume that stuff will be better then month when you show up and dust up the shotgun for the next shoot, then yes, it'll definitely take 20 years.

     

    Edited by buze

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    11 hours ago, buze said:

    Hmm I shoot considerably better than many people who've been shooting for 20 years. I've been shooting slightly over 2 years. Heck, my wife (who shoots a lot less than I do) ALSO shoot considerably better than many people we meet who've been shooting for a lot longer.

    It's not time, it's how you spend the time. For any activity, you can either blast away, do no introspection and declare that 'practice will make perfect' -- or you can go shoot, then sit down and figure out what you did right, and what you did wrong, and try to understand why you did wrong. And then think about it.

    Like many other activity requiring hand/head coordination, a lot of the 'learning' is done offline, in bed, or talking, and definitely NOT doing the activity in question. Musical instrument playing is like that; you can do heaps and bounds *between* practice sessions, even on holidays sometime away from your instrument because your brain is figuring stuff out for you... that is, if you are *dedicated* to it. I you assume that stuff will be better then month when you show up and dust up the shotgun for the next shoot, then yes, it'll definitely take 20 years.

     

    Yep, true enough.

    I don't shoot clays - haven't done so for some 20 years until a couple of months back when my step--son who's just started shooting dragged me along a couple of times. As I'm down yur and he be up thur, it's not going to be a frequent occurrence. What I noticed though was that nothing seems to have changed. No one seemed to be very happy - what the hell happened to simply just enjoying yourself?

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    I think people are misunderstanding the context of this "rule", it mustn't be interpreted simplistically to mean you could ever categorise peoples skill levels by the amount of time they've spent shooting, rather it only really refers to the top layer anyway. 

    It is simply saying in order to become truly great at certain things and sports, that you need to have spent an inordinately long length of time pursuing that greatness. 

    It is a given that you first need to possess that little something. It is also misleading to presume that since some people who apparently arrive at the scene fairly fresh but proceed to beat more experienced folk are disproving the theory, they're merely in possession of a bigger portion of what is necessary for greatness to begin with. Remember too that such early displays of skill don't always pan out into a lifetime ;) of excellence, only the gifted who persevere break into the very top of sport. 

    Edited by Hamster

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    13 hours ago, wymberley said:

    No one seemed to be very happy - what the hell happened to simply just enjoying yourself?

    Years ago when health and finances were better I took it a lot more seriously than I do now,

    These days I shoot for fun and the craic.....

    When this stops being fun I will pack in.

    Yes there are days when you get frustrated but I’m not going to be the next Digweed anyway so good luck to those that want to enter and win competitions but it’s not for me, I still have little personal goals but that’s it 😊

    :shaun:

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    Next time you are at a shoot, without being too obvious, ascertain who(m) has been shooting the longest, and if it’s any where near this, bet on them.  Drinks all round!

    Not sure how you would ascertain who had shot what. Never seen anyone betting on the outcome of a shoot. Who is buying the drinks and why?:hmm::hmm::hmm:

    The theory that Gladwell expounded is naïve, to put it mildly. I wonder if anyone - eg. George Digweed - got to the top without practising 1.5 hours a day for twenty years. I seem to remember that he was at the top long before that.

    Edited by Gordon R

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    10 hours ago, shaun4860 said:

    Years ago when health and finances were better I took it a lot more seriously than I do now,

    These days I shoot for fun and the craic.....

    When this stops being fun I will pack in.

    Yes there are days when you get frustrated but I’m not going to be the next Digweed anyway so good luck to those that want to enter and win competitions but it’s not for me, I still have little personal goals but that’s it 😊

    This.

    Mine is to hit something occasionally.

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