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Harry136

Need help zeroing

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    Ok, I probably set up and zero more than 100-150 rifle/scope combinations each year and here is the thing, other than night vision optics, not one centrefire needed any kind of shimming to zero at 100m.

    You have the wrong mounts, the wrong bases, a broken scope, something out of position in the stock, a wonky barrel, bad muzzle thread or something between the stock/barrel. The only time they ever shoot too high is because of of an inclined rail without enough scope travel to compensate for a baseline zero of something like an inclined one piece mount you dont realise is in use. Could I suggest you take a photo of the setup, in focus, from the side perspective.

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    12 hours ago, Harry136 said:

    When i bought the gun, i put it on medium mounts and it seemed spot on, however the mounts sat too high for a cheek weld.There are specific shims for the rings so there won't be any damage. Would shimming just the rear mount work to bring the front down?

    This rifle hasn't already got Burris rings with plastic inserts

    has it? Or a 20 moa rail?

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    All this talk of shims etc is BS, there is a much more fundamental problem somewhere.

    I struggle to think of any rifle/mount situation where shims would be required at 100 yards and definitely not with a Sidewinder on a .243!

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    18 hours ago, Whitester said:

    If it won't adjust down anymore then pack the back scope mount. I use electrical tape and put layers in until I get the adjustment I need. Usually three layers should bring you plenty of adjustment.

     

    try to cut the pieces to the exact size of the bottom half of the mount so there's no over hang, it works for me

    He says it is shooting to high, if you pack the back scope mount (which I am not a fan of at all) then it will shoot even higher, not lower.

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    15 hours ago, Harry136 said:

    When i bought the gun, i put it on medium mounts and it seemed spot on, however the mounts sat too high for a cheek weld.There are specific shims for the rings so there won't be any damage. Would shimming just the rear mount work to bring the front down?

    If you want to bring the POI down then shim the FRONT mount not the rear!

    But as I said, there is something more fundamental going on here, especially if you say it worked fine with the previous mounts!

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    On ‎27‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 05:35, Whitester said:

    How is a scope damaged by putting a few layers of electrical tape on the bottom half of the mount?

    It isn't necessarily if you do the same on both mounts!

    If you just do it to one mount then the scope will not fit evenly/parallel in front and rear mounts so you "can" kink/bend/stress/damage the scope externally and potentially internally as well!

    Edited by Dekers

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    I can’t see how putting shims in your mounts would damage your scope and i’ll Continue to do so in mine because personally I have never damaged a scope by putting shims in.

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    The only shims that won't mechanically stress your scope are the Burris rings with plastic inserts - these work on a "Rose bearing" principle that will allow you to add height to the rear of your scope to gain more elevation - or indeed to straighten up a scope side to side where the rail has been fitted off centre.

    Shimming scopes seems to be common practice on airguns and with cheap scopes on .22lr's but with a decent scope on a centrefire is a bodge to say the least.

    As Dekers says - there's something fundamentally wrong that want's fixing first. 

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    I had this problem, it was a brand new rifle barrel wasn’t seated properly.

    there are to many factors. Just because it’s new doesn’t mean it’s all ok. Easiest way is shim the scope at the front I didn’t wanna do this so took the gun back and got another after they tested the rifle, put the same scope and mounts back and all was good it only has to be out by mm to cause problems.

     

    edit to say nice looking rifle setup :good:

    Edited by Rst1990

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    6 hours ago, Whitester said:

    I can’t see how putting shims in your mounts would damage your scope and i’ll Continue to do so in mine because personally I have never damaged a scope by putting shims in.

    Your choice don’t know what you do for a living but I expect I saw more rifle and zeroed and fixed issues on them than you own.   

     

    Crack on and enjoy.  

     

     

    OP look at Fisters advice he’s bang on the money. Be careful where you get your advice for remedies on here most people on here fiddle for a hobby some it’s how we make our living

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    I'm not going to add any tips on the do's and dont's of mounting a scope, but I (That's me) would have preferred if the scope was mounted lower. 

     

    For the few that don't know or think that all scope mounts are the same height check out Ruger 77 mounts,  get those the wrong way round and torque up the screws and you WILL have a bent tube. 

     

    2 people on here have given you sound advice. I don't have the time to play tonight I'm off shooting..  

     

     

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    7 hours ago, Whitester said:

    I can’t see how putting shims in your mounts would damage your scope and i’ll Continue to do so in mine because personally I have never damaged a scope by putting shims in.

    Your choice.

    What the heck scopes/mounts/rifles have you got that you have to keep putting shims in?

    I run a lot of rifles in an assortment of calibres and shoot out to considerable distances and have never needed to shim any!

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    1 hour ago, Dekers said:

    Your choice.

    What the heck scopes/mounts/rifles have you got that you have to keep putting shims in?

    I run a lot of rifles in an assortment of calibres and shoot out to considerable distances and have never needed to shim any!

    Yukon photon recently .

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    As you can probably tell I am new to Shooting with this kind of scope, the closest thing I’ve used has been a susat! Originally when I set up the gun I was using medium mounts and it was spot on for zero. That said with medium mounts I could not get a cheek weld as the scope sat too high. Hence the reason for using lower mounts. So it would logical to assume that the problem is somehow with the mounts and not the gun or scope!

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    On ‎26‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 19:34, fister said:

     

    Turn it Upside down, PW CLASSIC😂

     

     

    That's not a PW classic that's supposedly the text book way of checking a scope is working and not sticking/jamming, by reversing the optical alignment. Centre the adjustment on the scope then fix the rifle firmly,  loosen the scope mounts just enough to allow it to turn and see where the scope is pointing both ways up.

    "in theory" it should point to approx. the same place both ways up. A variant is to adjust to max up* and max* down to see how they correlate both ways up as well. ie max up should point to the same place on the workshop wall as max down does when inverted. (and vice versa)

    You can check max left* and max right* the same way by reversing the optic, ie turning it upside down.

    When we used to import cheap scopes from China we used to get quite a few back with complaints about wont zero and we had to refund. Very few had detectable faults when we checked them on our test rig using the method above, and most of the returns were re-sold on ebay as second hand scopes with no further complaint. I have returned scopes on two of my rifles, still working fine.

    After you have done a few you know where they should be pointing before you start

    But we did find ones that were faulty and it was often the thread on the adjustment had been mysteriously damaged, they are actually quite fragile. As soon as I hear that it has been turned fully one way or another and still wont zero I start to suspect the thread has been damaged 

    * I am uneasy about anyone turning a scope to max adjustment unless they do it gently

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    Hi,  The photos of the rifle seem to show a higher ring on the rear of the scope, than the front  ring ?

    Maybe you have mixed up two sets of rings. ?

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    45 minutes ago, cardigun said:

    Hi,  The photos of the rifle seem to show a higher ring on the rear of the scope, than the front  ring ?

    Maybe you have mixed up two sets of rings. ?

    I thought that but wasn't sure if it was a trick of the camera

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    Pop it down to your local gunsmith and get it checked out.

    It was right.   You changed the mounts.   Now it's not right.   That's got to tell you something.

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    13 hours ago, Dekers said:

    Your choice.

    What the heck scopes/mounts/rifles have you got that you have to keep putting shims in?

    I run a lot of rifles in an assortment of calibres and shoot out to considerable distances and have never needed to shim any!

    TBH a lot of oddball older rifles were not built with any expectation of being scoped and have only had scope mounts fitted later in their life, sometimes a lot later. I know Williams Gun Sights on America make a scope mount with a height adjustment in the base to take up unevenness in height front to back but it shouldn't happen with a modern rifle.

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    1 hour ago, Vince Green said:

    I thought that but wasn't sure if it was a trick of the camera

    The rings look different heights to me too.

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