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Mr.C

Am I barking up the wrong tree.

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    Dear PW

    I work in London and live on the South Coast. I have wanted another dog, we have Jack Russell 4yo and entire. The  jack goes to work with the wife. I've been given the OK to bring a dog with me to work. I'd ideally like a small springer bitch and would like to give a home to a working dog that for some reason doesn't cut it. IE a 2 or 3 yo dog not a young pup

    4 days a week will involve a short walk to train, 80min train ride, 2mile walk through Royal parks and quiet streets. 

    Out at lunch. The reverse journey home in the evening. At work she'll be in a bed in her own area.

    On day 5 dog can stay home with missus and JR. Oh and there's a large Tom cat at home too. 

    Am I expecting too much? Is this workable? Never had a springer. 

    Thanks for your time to read. 

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    There are probably loads of country types who have a springer at work with them but my gut feel from having them is you are expecting too much given their energy. I would not want to subject any dog to that length of commute each day. What is wrong in them being at home in a kennel all day? My dogs have always been kennelled and no worse for that although I now work from home.

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    Springers have an on/off switch and they are happiest when you are pushing the on button - a Train journey like yours would, in my honest opinion, be totally out of the question for the Dogs well being and an Office would be hell on earth for her, and you for that matter, as she will be bored in minutes and go looking for entertainment - the Devil also finds work for idle Gun Dogs. I know it's not what you want to hear but I don't think your situation is suitable for a Springer but you are more than welcome to come and try tire mine out whenever you want.

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    Thanks for your honest responses. 

    The kennel idea is not one I would consider in my semi suburban street and I wouldn't want to rehome a dog and leave it for the day . I'd like a companion to come everywhere with me. 

    I'm in no huge rush, will see what comes along. 

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    If you don't mind going bigger, have a labrador. They will tolerate the scenario you want. Thats why they have them as guide dogs.  A failed guide dog might suit as its often something minor they fail on.

    Edited by loriusgarrulus

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    Must admit i have no idea about the commute as not something i've ever done. Might depend just how busy the train is?

    Also how would others feel about u having a dog on the train?? Dunno how close u are to each other, most folk would tolerate a guide dog etc but not everyone likes dogs

     

    But with the right training i don't see why i couldn't be possible, but the problem would be ideally u'd take it in small steps say 1/2 ur commute (or even less) and just an hour or so in office to get it used to both and then build up gradually, but i can't see that working for urself or ur boss, until the dog was trained.

    Probbly the biggest problem would be other staff faffing over it or giving it treats, encouraging it out from its rug/crate not realising ur trying to train it to stay there

     

    Just because springers have plenty of energy in the field it doesn't mean they can't relax and lie down when told esp for only a few hours at a time.

    Dogs are generally lazy ******* when they get the chance, mines are kennelled but u can nip home at an unusal time and there always sleeping in there boxes or lying in the sun sleeping, i can usually quietly open all the run doors without them waking up.

    As long as getting a walk and mental stimulation with training there usually quite happy even in kennels and sometimes happier in kennels as get there own space/routine

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    Go for it. Any breed I think you'd be ok. They soon custom to their life style. Have a cage in the office, so when in the office she knows to go to sleep and calm down, plus its her own space. She'll learn to relax on the journey and then let off steam on the way to the office with a bit of training, no reason she can't work as well. 

    I took my Cocker on 2 x 5hr train journeys at 14 weeks old (to go on holiday) I was so surprised how unphased he was, he just slept on a spare chair and on a longer stop we got off and he had a wee. It was great for him socializing and the train conductors loved him. They soon get use to it and at least you know she won't be nervous being in such busy places daily and she'll get a nice bond with you. 

    I disagree that Springer wouldn't be happy without the run of a office, they soon learn the office means keep calm specially with a cage and a nice bed, all dogs can have off switch if trained correctly - its the same as going to the pub, they learn to sleep.

    People keep puppies kenneled all day while at work with no mental stimulation, I think your situation is much more fair than that! I'd jump at the chance of having my dog in the office with me. Only you can make the decision, who cares what anyone else thinks, if you know you can give a dog a happy life, why not?

    Edited by Pigeonshooter22

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    I used to take my springer to work maybe once or twice every other week into a very relaxed office.  Being very much 'my dog' he always wanted to be as close to me as possible so would just spend most of his time under my desk at my feet, if he was away from me such as if I had a behind closed doors meeting he would chelp a bit so either be prepared for that or maybe look at where you put him/her in terms of their own space you mentioned.  My dog was always well received by staff and visitors, but it was only a couple of days a fortnight and I'd had the dog a few years and could pretty much predict how he'd behave, if I was looking at getting a 2 year old and taking them straight into that scenario I'd be having a long thing about a plan b in case it didn't work out I.e. what would I do if I had to leave it at home in the end.  I can't comment on the commute as I used to drive with the dog in the cage it always travelled in, but there's a trick guide dogs are taught (I think) where when training your dog to relax in social situations such as in a cafe/on the train, get the dog to lie down and put a foot on the lead (not tight to restrain it) and then ignore the dog,. After a while the dog associates that particular action with getting no interaction and shuts off........ In theory!!!

    i think your main challenge would be taking a new dog into the situation straight off, my dog spent all day at my home office at my feet so I cou,d predict the same at work, and if it didn't work out I could leave him at home with my wife.  I appreciate your scenario is different, but I hope it works out for you whatever you decide to do - apart from the rancid spaniel trumps, you can't beat having your best fried curled up,at your feet all day.

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    Let’s be realistic your employer isn’t going to let you “build it up” over weeks and weeks as your being paid to be in work doing your job, I don’t imagine they’d be impressed with you if your work performance took a decline, and they’d soon say the dog isn’t welcome. 

    Also, any decent spaniel would get bored and be hunting up every inch of that office, it all depends how good you want your dog to be and what you want it for. 

    If I was you I’d seriously consider a lab or perhaps rehoming and old almost retired spaniel that just needs a lot of rest and can do the odd bit of shooting... 

    Having a fit young dog with a lot of dog in that situation sounds completely unfair to the dog. 

    Now I know that’s not what you want to hear but please take it on board. Some people ask for advice then go out and do what they want anyways, personally I think that’s a very selfish attitude. End of the day it’s up to you. 

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    Lloyd even a fit young dog will spend most of its day sleeping if ur not there, its wether or not that individual dog can turn itself off as not all dogs could including labs.

    In theory getting it to lie below ur desk for a few hours at a time is far easier than expecting it to sit at a peg/butt or even below a high seat/ hide with everything else going on.

    An 'off' switch is  a good thing to try and train into them anyway so they can learn to relax even on shoot days.

     

    It could be done but a lot would depend on the actual dog's temperment and how i was introduced, but if u find its not working u then do have a poblem.

    Musst admit it think dogs are quite happy in a kennel anyway

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    33 minutes ago, scotslad said:

    Lloyd even a fit young dog will spend most of its day sleeping if ur not there, its wether or not that individual dog can turn itself off as not all dogs could including labs.

    In theory getting it to lie below ur desk for a few hours at a time is far easier than expecting it to sit at a peg/butt or even below a high seat/ hide with everything else going on.

    An 'off' switch is  a good thing to try and train into them anyway so they can learn to relax even on shoot days.

     

    It could be done but a lot would depend on the actual dog's temperment and how i was introduced, but if u find its not working u then do have a poblem.

    Musst admit it think dogs are quite happy in a kennel anyway

    Absolutely mate, but I’m all about giving yourself the best chance of success as is possible. 

    What if you have a spaniel and then it don’t work out? 

    Its easy to say “we would get rid of it” ... as some would of seen I had to take a pup back after only a week of having him, trust me it’s a nightmare and causes arguments. 

     

    Also if I wanted a dog to sit at a butt, on peg or below a high seat for long periods I just wouldn’t get a spaniel, as said tho a lab or more relaxed dog might be more suitable. 

    Some people have no problem using a spaniel for thesapp jobs, but as I said I prefer to give the best chance for the outcome you want. 

    Much like yourself however, I would personally opt to have a decent kennel put in, take the dog for a good run morning and night and spend time with it when Home in the house, and leave it in the kennel and run when at work. 

    Also avoids all the other people about trying to throw things for it, giving it treats and all sorts. 

    A woman in my work who is in a wheelchair has a black lab as an assistance dog, he’s brilliant but he’s covered in a big coat saying don’t distract him, and she is still constantly telling people to please not distract her dog. 

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    22 hours ago, Lloyd90 said:

    Absolutely mate, but I’m all about giving yourself the best chance of success as is possible. 

    What if you have a spaniel and then it don’t work out? 

    Its easy to say “we would get rid of it” ... as some would of seen I had to take a pup back after only a week of having him, trust me it’s a nightmare and causes arguments. 

     

    Also if I wanted a dog to sit at a butt, on peg or below a high seat for long periods I just wouldn’t get a spaniel, as said tho a lab or more relaxed dog might be more suitable. 

    Some people have no problem using a spaniel for thesapp jobs, but as I said I prefer to give the best chance for the outcome you want. 

    Much like yourself however, I would personally opt to have a decent kennel put in, take the dog for a good run morning and night and spend time with it when Home in the house, and leave it in the kennel and run when at work. 

    Also avoids all the other people about trying to throw things for it, giving it treats and all sorts. 

    A woman in my work who is in a wheelchair has a black lab as an assistance dog, he’s brilliant but he’s covered in a big coat saying don’t distract him, and she is still constantly telling people to please not distract her dog. 

     

    I agree Lloyd, A spaniel can do a labs job if trained right.. maybe it will be more difficult to train to sit on peg but is possible, seen a few nice spaniels as peg dogs who sit off lead quickly all day so can be done. To be honest in a office environment my spaniel is better than our lab as hes quiet, as lab barks and its the same with directors working lab, barks a lot. Depends on training and individual dog. All dogs should have a off switch and a office environment is good for that, and getting them socialized. 
    It all depends on your own opinion, I would rather have my dog under my desk in a cage with wee breaks often than at home all day on their own in a kennel - specially a young pup. Each to their own again, as my family and friends play with toys all the time with ours, throw them, play with them.. they definitely know the difference between playing and training/work.. it has never affected any of ours. All dogs should have some down time specially a 8 week old pup, but again, some will disagree with me so we'll have to agree to disagree lol.

    Your always get tons of opinions on here, its best to do what you feel is right and only you know your current situation. Remember a dogs for life. 

    Best of luck.

    Edited by Pigeonshooter22

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    My wife has taken both my lab and her cocker to work since they were both pups, without any issues. They each have a crate and get a walk twice a day, the rest of the time they sleep.

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    8 minutes ago, Mr.C said:

    There will be pictures for sure. 

    She's a black Patterdale x, 9months old. 

    Nice size for tucking under the desk. Hope she's not too fiesty.

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    This is her chilling and catching some rays on her 1st day at work. 

    But as for feisty, she's not a good food sharer to put it mildly.

    DSC_0128-1224x1632.JPG

    Edited by Mr.C
    Extra info

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    36 minutes ago, Mr.C said:

    This is her chilling and catching some rays on her 1st day at work. 

    But as for feisty, she's not a good food sharer to put it mildly.

    DSC_0128-1224x1632.JPG

    Nice looking. Butter wouldn't melt when they are asleep.

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    If it's getting plenty of exercise morning and evening on top of your commute I'd say go for it as it'll want to sleep the rest of the time, if not, personally I wouldn't think it fair on the dog, as for people saying a dog would be happier in a kennel all day rather than with you is in my opinion ridiculous, dogs want very little in life to be happy, food, exercise/stimulation and companionship (obviously medical care if needed), most poor dog owners fail on enough exercise and/or company. 

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    She gets 20mins followed by train followed by 1hr walk to work. 30mins walk at lunchtime followed by the same back home. At work when I turn my back and work she lays on her bed and sleeps. Good as gold. And she and my JR are getting on famous too. 

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    14 hours ago, Mr.C said:

    She gets 20mins followed by train followed by 1hr walk to work. 30mins walk at lunchtime followed by the same back home. At work when I turn my back and work she lays on her bed and sleeps. Good as gold. And she and my JR are getting on famous too. 

    Sounds great and is a far better life for her than a dog that sits in a kennel for half it's life.

    She looks a cracker, enjoy your time together 👍

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