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eddoakley

Tradesman rates

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    28 minutes ago, Scully said:

    I much prefer being self employed; it gives me much more freedom  to do what I want when I want. Obviously you still have commitments, but being employed restricts me greatly. 

    Absolutely agree.

    I have way too much time off with shooting that there is no chance i could do on the books.Do as little as i need to over the winter but does mean a fair bit of catching up after.

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    On 06/12/2018 at 23:21, Ultrastu said:

    Thats the thing isnt it .charge 200 day and work for 2 days a week or 150 a day and work for 5 days a week .every week .

     

    From the look of your work, i presume you could make windows bespoke?. If so, you'd be known as a joiner round here, which is counted as more qualified than a "Chippy" knocking out new build houses. But i agree with your sentiment regarding pricing.

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    4 hours ago, jam1e said:

    From the look of your work, i presume you could make windows bespoke?. If so, you'd be known as a joiner round here, which is counted as more qualified than a "Chippy" knocking out new build houses. But i agree with your sentiment regarding pricing.

    Around here most people don’t know the difference 😞 .  

    Both as qualified as each other but different parts of the trade.

    ive met several joiners that are lost out the shop and struggle with door bashing . 

    Met a few chippys that have shocked me on the other hand and made some incredible work

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    1 minute ago, amateur said:

    Please help out the ignorant.

    What is the difference between a carpenter and a joiner?

    Not sure, but I was always told that as a joiner...if you bang a nail in and the wood splits, you should have used a screw! 🙂 

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    22 minutes ago, amateur said:

    Please help out the ignorant.

    What is the difference between a carpenter and a joiner?

    Depending where your from in the country, but generally a joiner makes items like doors, stairs, windows ect as well as fitting them, whereas a carpenter will fit joinery items on site.

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    55 minutes ago, Scully said:

    Not sure, but I was always told that as a joiner...if you bang a nail in and the wood splits, you should have used a screw! 🙂 

    I like that Scully!

     

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    3 hours ago, amateur said:

    Please help out the ignorant.

    What is the difference between a carpenter and a joiner?

     I am a "joiner and cabinet maker" by trade.

    I did my apprenticeship in the workshop making windows, door, cabinets (lots of changing room lockers for posh golf clubs), kitchens and other joinery items such as stairs, door frames and linings, skirting and architrave. - joiner

    I left the workshop and worked on site fitting windows, doors, kitchens etc. putting on roofs, joists and building studwork. - carpenter.

    Depending on their ability some will tell you that they are 1st or 2nd fix carpenters. 1st fix being joists, roofs, studwork, maybe shuttering (but that's another story), basically the rougher work that can be done with a chainsaw and a nailgun. 2nd fix being the finer aspects that require more finesse.

    Some will do both to the correct standard.

    In some parts carpenters are called joiners but not around here and I think not technically correct in dictionary definitions.

     

    Edd

     

     

    Edited by eddoakley

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    4 minutes ago, amateur said:

    Thanks for that. I always wondered.

    A cabinet maker is someone who can nail a box together, then

    Yeah, but make it look good too!

    Haha.

    A joiner could make the box without nails.

    I was lucky through my apprenticeship and early working life. I worked with some very good tradesmen as well as some really rough ones. 

    Starting in the joiners shop where everything having to be mm perfect then being on site cutting on a roof where the guys would laugh at the measurements I would take/cut before pushing me out of the way and starting a chainsaw. Nothing wrong with that and was a good way to learn. I always like to think that I took the best bits of advice from 65 year old guys that had done it all their lives and also from those that were barely older or more experienced than me.

     

    Edd

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    I admire anyone who can make things from wood.

    Metal, I can deal with, but precision in wood is an unknown to me. Probably because I wasn't allowed to do woodwork at school.

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    13 minutes ago, amateur said:

    I admire anyone who can make things from wood.

    Metal, I can deal with, but precision in wood is an unknown to me. Probably because I wasn't allowed to do woodwork at school.

    I was fortunate enough to learn basic skills with both wood and metal at school. Still put those basic skills to use, but what these guys can do shows mastery. Well done, thanks for posting examples of your skills. 👏👌👍

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    10 hours ago, Scully said:

    I much prefer being self employed; it gives me much more freedom  to do what I want when I want. Obviously you still have commitments, but being employed restricts me greatly. 

    Exactly. It’s a great feeling not having to tell your boss you’ve got to take a day off for this and that. Being in control of your own working life is the holy grail for me. Maybe I’ll say different in 30 years time though.

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    Looks like the questions already answered.

    carpenter site

    joiner shop 

    thats the basics but it does mix up a fair bit as edd said.

    im fortunate that I was brought up in the building with my dad who was already a trained joiner. 

    I can do the basics like plastering ( not a good grade in my eyes) bits of brick work but again not a high grade I can admit.

    I do all aspects of carpentry and joinery from roofing to hanging doors to making the lot from scratch from a plank . Only down side is my lads get snatched up after training by us as they have a varied trade. 

     

     

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    1 hour ago, winnie&bezza said:

    Exactly. It’s a great feeling not having to tell your boss you’ve got to take a day off for this and that. Being in control of your own working life is the holy grail for me. Maybe I’ll say different in 30 years time though.

    Depends on your boss dude :) 

    im pretty easy with my lads. Extra time at dinner and break but they stay over 20-30 mins every night without asking so I can’t grumble . If they need time off it’s easy to just ask us except December as that’s a no go. So many orders to complete.

    i work 50-80 hours every week and have 5-8 days a year off so I’d be better off . If I was a man in a van without staff I guess It could be easier to get time off but even when I’m chucking my guts I have to open up for staff . Out most nights pricing work for the lads and Saturdays Organizing the shop. 

    Only problem is we’re the last joiner shop for 20-30 miles that do what we do so I’ll be stuck if I go in a van permanently 

     

    i wish your were closer dude , I’ve so much work to give you

    Edited by team tractor

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    5 hours ago, Scully said:

    Not sure, but I was always told that as a joiner...if you bang a nail in and the wood splits, you should have used a screw! 🙂 

    ...but how do they put the screws in?   In the place where I used to live, folk told me a screwdriver was for taking screws OUT.

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    7 minutes ago, McSpredder said:

    ...but how do they put the screws in?   In the place where I used to live, folk told me a screwdriver was for taking screws OUT.

    Brummy screwdriver we know it as 

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    1 hour ago, amateur said:

    I admire anyone who can make things from wood.

    Metal, I can deal with, but precision in wood is an unknown to me. Probably because I wasn't allowed to do woodwork at school.

    I still like to play :) 

    3468B533-D871-42F6-B003-40DFA42B172B.jpeg

    DBA47964-D176-4A75-A59C-5C2333886038.jpeg

    Edited by team tractor

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    1 hour ago, team tractor said:

    Depends on your boss dude  

    im pretty easy with my lads. Extra time at dinner and break but they stay over 20-30 mins every night without asking so I can’t grumble . If they need time off it’s easy to just ask us except December as that’s a no go. So many orders to complete.

    i work 50-80 hours every week and have 5-8 days a year off so I’d be better off . If I was a man in a van without staff I guess It could be easier to get time off but even when I’m chucking my guts I have to open up for staff . Out most nights pricing work for the lads and Saturdays Organizing the shop. 

    Only problem is we’re the last joiner shop for 20-30 miles that do what we do so I’ll be stuck if I go in a van permanently 

     

    i wish your were closer dude , I’ve so much work to give you

    My one and only boss was a **** 😂

    yeah your problem is having a workforce. Much more work. 

    I’m really lucky at the moment as I’m booked up until end of jan and all work is 10 mins away at most 😀

    or you come down here, we team up and clean up 😂

    Everyone is really busy in Kent and the joiners I work with have said that in 30 years of business, it’s the busiest they’ve had it. Just can’t keep up with it. 

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    6 minutes ago, amateur said:

    Was that the mahogany amendment?

    Yes . How’d you guess :) 

    38 minutes ago, winnie&bezza said:

    My one and only boss was a **** 😂

    yeah your problem is having a workforce. Much more work. 

    I’m really lucky at the moment as I’m booked up until end of jan and all work is 10 mins away at most 😀

    or you come down here, we team up and clean up 😂

    Everyone is really busy in Kent and the joiners I work with have said that in 30 years of business, it’s the busiest they’ve had it. Just can’t keep up with it. 

    It’s busy but it’s definitely quieter with Brexit around the corner. All the big suppliers ( national) have said its been  a quiet few months especially on kitchens, the fixings reps are begging us to place orders we don’t need to hit bonus  . We have jan/ feb but usually got 4-5 months dude. We just give away carpentry these days and sell the stuff. 

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    On 08/12/2018 at 23:21, Vince Green said:

    If you are currently employed by NHS (which I think you are) never leave it to go self employed. Once you are on the other side the agencies have you by the round bits.

    I’m both. FT with nhs but my rota means I work 14 days out of 35. I’m also self employed with a training company with a day rate of £225 per 8 hours plus expenses. 

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