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Old Boggy

Puds when you were a kid. What was your favourite ?

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    On 15/12/2018 at 10:34, billytheghillie said:

    My Granny used to make Cloutie Dumpling, AAAAHHHH   Bliss.

    What on earth is `Cloutie` ?

    I know of a `clouter`, but in a slightly different context.

    OB

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    Posted (edited)

    A Clout is a old Scottish word for cloth.  The dumpling mix was placed in a muslin cloth and put in to a steamer.  Also pronounced Clootie.

    Edited by billytheghillie

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    Posted (edited)
    5 hours ago, billytheghillie said:

    A Clout is a old Scottish word for cloth.  The dumpling mix was placed in a muslin cloth and put in to a steamer.  Also pronounced Clootie.

    English Saying?............"never cast a clout till May is out" 

    Edited by panoma1
    Predictive text!😠

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    Apple Sharllot    my grandmother would make these and served with lashings of home made custard and she would spoil me by stirring in some cream from our own cows.

    Apple covered with a sponge mixture plus 'seasoning' in a shallow dish.

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    Posted (edited)
    21 hours ago, panoma1 said:

    English Saying?............"never cast a clout till May is out" 

    Generally thought to refer to the month, whereas it refers to `may` i.e. hawthorn blossom.

    Anyone else heard of `clouter` being used in a most derogatory manner when referring to a certain part of a woman`s anatomy, or is it just me ? :hmm:

    OB

    Edited by Old Boggy

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    Posted (edited)
    7 minutes ago, Old Boggy said:

    Anyone else heard of `clouter` being used in a most derogatory manner when referring to a certain part of a woman`s anatomy, or is it just me ? 

    OB

    I've heard the term clout used in that way 🤐

    Edited by old_n07

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    On 02/01/2019 at 13:42, panoma1 said:

    English Saying?............"never cast a clout till May is out" 

    "Clout" was the sewn up underwear that poor children had all through the winter, after being covered in grease. Flaps for bathroom use, natch.

    "May" is the hawthorn.

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    It was my wife's birthday last week, so I took her to a pub in deepest Kent for lunch.

    My heart lifted when I saw bread and butter pudding on the menu, albeit made with brioche, marmalade and flavoured with scotch.

    What a disappointment - overly sweet, not enough custard, soggy bread with no crispy bits and not a trace of scotch that I could detect.

    The only solution was to make my own, yesterday.

    So the last I/2 inch of a bottle of blended scotch was used to soak a handful of sultanas overnight. Half a dozen eggs and a pot of single cream were whisked together. Two slices of wholemeal bread were generously buttered and thickly spread with Dalfour orange and ginger marmalade and sandwiched together, then cut into inch cubes.

    I used a small oval pyrex dish, put half the sultanas and all the scotch on the bottom, then layered the bread sandwiches next, which soaked up the scotch. The remaining sultanas topped it off. Then egg and cream mix  went in and was allowed to soak in for a while whilst the oven was getting up to 120 degrees.

    I baked it for 1 hour, together with the leftover custard mix put into a crème brulée dish for my gluten-free wife.

    It was bread and butter pudding as I remembered it

    Edited by amateur

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    On 02/01/2019 at 12:07, billytheghillie said:

    A Clout is a old Scottish word for cloth.  The dumpling mix was placed in a muslin cloth and put in to a steamer.  Also pronounced Clootie.

    I am not sure if the dumpling mix in a muslin cloth that was put in a steamer was a Scottish tradition or was used all over the U K , my old grand father done exactly the same and spent a fair bit of time in the Scottish ports while catching the Herring ,

    He done the same with steak and kidney puddings , I remember him during the dumplings most days of the week and he would often have them hot , cut in half with butter .  

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