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28g for Pheasant


johnnytheboy
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I’m part of an everyday pheasant syndicate, not super high birds just jumping tree tops or hedgerows that sort of thing. My nephews and niece are getting big enough to have a wee shot soon and I was thinking on a 28g for them to shoot clays with. Would a 28g be effective on these tree top pheasants? 20-25yds at very most. 

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Having had a 28 I'd go for a lightweight 20 bore. Somethig like a Yildiz with the stock shortened to suit. Much larger range of carts from very light to Fu on high bird game carts. Also entry of steel shot options for over water.

Yes the 28 can kill well to a good distance but takes more skill to hit things with.

I'm thinking of a nice 20 bore for future use by younger family and women.

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A 28b with 21g to 25g of no7 (clay fibre loading) will drop any pheasant within 35 yards so no need to worry on that score.  My 410 with 21g of no7 is more than capable of this.

The pattern will be the same width as a 12 bore, just slightly less dense, however at the ranges above are more than adequate to kill cleanly each and every time without resorting to too much choke.  (IMP and 1/4 or 1/4 and 1/2), try to avoid a gun that is overchoked.

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4 hours ago, Gunman said:

As long as you can hit them . Dont take this the wrong way but its the man behind the gun . Lets face it some folks couldn't hit a sitting pheasant at 20 paces with a 8 bore ..

Confidence is more important than  caliber .

What I can do is hit the really hard or fast ones, then the real easy ones I miss 🤔 

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On 15/12/2018 at 12:03, Gunman said:

As long as you can hit them . Dont take this the wrong way but its the man behind the gun . Lets face it some folks couldn't hit a sitting pheasant at 20 paces with a 8 bore ..

Confidence is more important than  caliber .

This.The 28 will do it, as long as you're a good enough shot.  I'm a big fan of as large a bore as the beginner ( especially a youngster ) can handle and wide open chokes. There's nothing guaranteed to kill ones enthusiasm and confidence quicker than constantly missing.  Let's face it, there's enough to remember when standing on that peg for the first time. Personally I'd opt for the 20 if they're too small for a 12. 

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On 14/12/2018 at 20:12, johnnytheboy said:

I’m part of an everyday pheasant syndicate, not super high birds just jumping tree tops or hedgerows that sort of thing. My nephews and niece are getting big enough to have a wee shot soon and I was thinking on a 28g for them to shoot clays with. Would a 28g be effective on these tree top pheasants? 20-25yds at very most. 

A very similar situation I found myself in a few seasons ago. I had initially looked at a 20 for the youngsters, after realising that a .410 is more expert territory and as Scully says missing kills enthusiasm.

So it was a 20 we were after and while going through the racks in the shop to see what was easiest to handle for a youngster we finally settled on a Lincoln 28 Bore as it was quite a bit lighter than the 20s.

After myself and the youngsters had smashed a few clays with it, I then promptly nicked it for game shooting and that's what I've been using the past 3 seasons. My shoots are quite informal. Not massive bags so there is a lot more gun carrying / holding than actual shooting and the lightness of the 28, plus the ability to just stuff 20-30 cartridges in a pocket is quite liberating.

It is absolutely more than enough gun for sensible pheasant shooting. I use 24 gram #5 or #5 1/2 for game shooting and 21 gram #6 1/2 for pigeons and clays. For beginners I have a very nice 16 gram #9 load that has almost no recoil.

I like the 28 bore so much I bought myself one 'proper' this year, rather than nicking the kids gun.

 

Cheers

 

 

Clive

 

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3 hours ago, cliveward said:

A very similar situation I found myself in a few seasons ago. I had initially looked at a 20 for the youngsters, after realising that a .410 is more expert territory and as Scully says missing kills enthusiasm.

So it was a 20 we were after and while going through the racks in the shop to see what was easiest to handle for a youngster we finally settled on a Lincoln 28 Bore as it was quite a bit lighter than the 20s.

After myself and the youngsters had smashed a few clays with it, I then promptly nicked it for game shooting and that's what I've been using the past 3 seasons. My shoots are quite informal. Not massive bags so there is a lot more gun carrying / holding than actual shooting and the lightness of the 28, plus the ability to just stuff 20-30 cartridges in a pocket is quite liberating.

It is absolutely more than enough gun for sensible pheasant shooting. I use 24 gram #5 or #5 1/2 for game shooting and 21 gram #6 1/2 for pigeons and clays. For beginners I have a very nice 16 gram #9 load that has almost no recoil.

I like the 28 bore so much I bought myself one 'proper' this year, rather than nicking the kids gun.

 

Cheers

 

 

Clive

 

Superb, thank you very much for this Clive, this is great advice, thank you! 

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28 and 20 are both very good guns, particularly as “second guns.” They are good enough for almost all shooting that we do - particularly 20. 

I reccomend both calibers a lot but I’d say get a 20 if they can handle it. Although you could get some really nice second hand 28’s for good value (particularly SxS). 

 

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On 19/12/2018 at 16:47, cliveward said:

A very similar situation I found myself in a few seasons ago. I had initially looked at a 20 for the youngsters, after realising that a .410 is more expert territory and as Scully says missing kills enthusiasm.

So it was a 20 we were after and while going through the racks in the shop to see what was easiest to handle for a youngster we finally settled on a Lincoln 28 Bore as it was quite a bit lighter than the 20s.

After myself and the youngsters had smashed a few clays with it, I then promptly nicked it for game shooting and that's what I've been using the past 3 seasons. My shoots are quite informal. Not massive bags so there is a lot more gun carrying / holding than actual shooting and the lightness of the 28, plus the ability to just stuff 20-30 cartridges in a pocket is quite liberating.

It is absolutely more than enough gun for sensible pheasant shooting. I use 24 gram #5 or #5 1/2 for game shooting and 21 gram #6 1/2 for pigeons and clays. For beginners I have a very nice 16 gram #9 load that has almost no recoil.

I like the 28 bore so much I bought myself one 'proper' this year, rather than nicking the kids gun.

 

Cheers

 

 

Clive

 

Couldn't agree more Clive I use a Lincoln choked 1/4 &  1/2 bought it about 4 years back. Brilliant gun took it out yesterday and got remarks from the neighbouring guns on how effective it was. May have even converted a few. 

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