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Gun stock damp stain.

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Hi Everybody.

Im hoping that someone could help me with a what I believe to be damp in the stock of my AYA Yeoman. 

What started out to be my first and supposedly simple re finish job turned into a bit of a nightmare. 

I believe it to be damp or some sort of mold. It goes right through the wood and can be seen from the inside when the but plate is removed. And only on the one side 

I have searched the Internet but can’t seem to find anything that relates. I did try some oxalic acid and soaked it for a couple of hours thinking it would lift it but It didn’t touch it. It did lift other stains form around the action but nothing on the this black stain. I even tried some bleach but again didn’t touch it. It also seems to be getting worse the longer it’s left un protected and in places it wasn’t in before. 

If someone could help a fellow gun lover out it would be much appreciated.  

 

 

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Is it not just the natural markings within the wood?........why do you think it is damp/water stain? How would it have gotten there? Assuming the stock was originally factory finished with a type of waterproof varnish

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20 minutes ago, panoma1 said:

Is it not just the natural markings within the wood?........why do you think it is damp/water stain? How would it have gotten there? Assuming the stock was originally factory finished with a type of waterproof varnish

Thanks for your reply. 

I was thinking it was damp because of how localised it was originally, when I first removed the finish, it didn’t seam to follow any grain and has since spread into follow more of the grain. I have used this gun in a lot of wet weather and the wood behind the but plate wasn’t protected so I assumed it may have gotten in there? 

 

 

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41 minutes ago, bigroomboy said:

looks like it may have been part of the wood originally? You could stain the stock to bring the colours closer together?

It may well be part of the wood. It just doesn't look like it’s meant to be there and it’s only on that part of the stock, everywhere else looks really clean in comparison. I thought the Yeoman only used cheaper plain wood. 

 

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I assume you are going for oil finish?,If so the Alkanet oil will enhance the timber ,if you have never done one I can recomend "Trade Secrets", you will get agreat finish if you follow instructions.

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That is the natural grain of the wood. It should come out more when you oil it.

Some like to darken the wood with alkanet root helps blend the differences a bit.

I like to see the natural colours and grain of the wood exactly as it grew.

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Stain

Looks very much to me like a nice bit of figuring on an otherwise plain stock and no problem at all. As has been said finish with trade Secrets or London gunstock finish with perhaps a couple of wipes with Alkanet and it will look lovely.

Just don't scrimp and use cooking oil or something silly on it.

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I would apply alkanet root oil every day for a week, then have another close look at it. 

I would also reiterate the choice of the the Trade Secrets products. I have just gone to the "once a week" stage with my 725 and it is starting to look good. I used the 'once a day for a week, once a week for a month, and then once a month for a year' approach.

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13 hours ago, vampire said:

wash the wood with oxi action incredible results.

I too have heard this. Looks like good stuff. Not going to get the pattern out of the wood though.

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On 29/09/2019 at 13:47, guzzicat said:

I assume you are going for oil finish?,If so the Alkanet oil will enhance the timber ,if you have never done one I can recomend "Trade Secrets", you will get agreat finish if you follow instructions.

That’s exactly what I am going to use. Read good things about Trade Secret. 

I was worried if it was some sort of damp what issues would arise after it was all sealed in, but after reading everyone’s comments saying it’s just part of the wood makes me feel better about it. 

I now just have to the laborious task of sanding it all down and re cutting the checkering. 

What is the best way of applying the rapid oil into the checkering without it filling it in too much? Is it best to only do one coat right on the last application of oil? 

 

 

 

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19 hours ago, vampire said:

wash the wood with oxi action incredible results.

I did stumble upon this in a forum somewhere and was close to doing it until i read that it can be very harsh on the wood so decided not to. Would you soak the wood or just give it a quick scrub? 

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stain

 Best of luck mate and I do wish you well ,  but I just cant get my head round the fact that you feel confident to re-chequer the stock which is a highly skilled job needing experience and special tools whilst not knowing the first thig about wood. 

Just a thought.

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26 minutes ago, DUNKS said:

 

 Best of luck mate and I do wish you well ,  but I just cant get my head round the fact that you feel confident to re-chequer the stock which is a highly skilled job needing experience and special tools whilst not knowing the first thig about wood. 

Just a thought.

Thanks Dunks, I’m only lightly going over the original checkering to refresh it. I have already done the the fore grip and it’s looking pretty sweet. I may not have made myself out to be in what I have said but I’m pretty good with my hands. I have done bit of wood work before, just not with this sort of wood. I was just unsure about the condition of the wood and wanted to hear from people with knowledge in this sort of thing to help me out, which they have done beautifully. 

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23 minutes ago, Woods said:

Thanks Dunks, I’m only lightly going over the original checkering to refresh it. I have already done the the fore grip and it’s looking pretty sweet. I may not have made myself out to be in what I have said but I’m pretty good with my hands. I have done bit of wood work before, just not with this sort of wood. I was just unsure about the condition of the wood and wanted to hear from people with knowledge in this sort of thing to help me out, which they have done beautifully. 

Good on ya for having a go just be careful.

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I would not apply Rapid oil to the chequering, it is a bit too heavy to remove afterwards. I have cleaned chequering with an old toothbrush and white spirit, then just applied Alkanet oil, which is thinner and will soak into the wood easier. This helps prevent the 'sticky' feel to the stock,  when the gun is in use.

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Posted (edited)

OP I would be very careful with that Alkanet oil if you use it. It is a red plant die used to give stocks that slightly red London finish Look. Too much and you will have a very silly colour. AND IT DOES SOAK IN DEEP.

Edited by DUNKS

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start off light...you can always darken it.............do it the other way round and you are stuffed

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If you used oxalic acid at the correct dilution rate and it didn't shift then as others have said it's supposed to be there. 

I used oxalic after staying in a damp rental where the stock on my miroku got mildew over it. After stripping back varnish (nightmare by the way) it had loads of black dots on it. One wipe over with oxalic and they literally vanished while looking at it. 

I used red kite products and got a nice finish on it. 

 

Good luck. 

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On 30/09/2019 at 18:22, Woods said:

I did stumble upon this in a forum somewhere and was close to doing it until i read that it can be very harsh on the wood so decided not to. Would you soak the wood or just give it a quick scrub? 

Give it a good soak.Half fill a bucket with warm water/oxiaction and scrub,towel dry and leave wrapped to dry naturally .

I have done this to one of my guns,went all through my usual routine and was ready to apply the finish ,but not entirely happy with staining in the wood,found an American guy washing stocks ,so raided the cupboard and trailed some oxi action,the wood came out like it was brand new sent from the factory and 100%improvement over the way I do stocks and is now the only way i do it.

It also has good results on the action all metal parts gleaming.

Wood did not warp/split/go furry etc,just looked like it did when it came off the moulding tool,new.

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5 hours ago, figgy said:

Hope he didn't use Cillit bang and the stock was gone.

Hhahhaqhhah....good one:lol:

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