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twenty

Labrador/Stroke

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One of my son's older Labradors had a stroke last Thursday, she is 14 years old and now lives indoors, my son's partner is a veterinary nurse so the dog has received the best of treatment.

Remembering her as part of the beating and picking up team seems a lifetime ago now, but she is still a very much loved part of the family.

At the moment her head is held at a 45 degree angle, and she is unsteady on her feet, she has had anti sickness treatment for dizziness, and seems to be improving slightly on a daily basis,

All the advice we have received, seems to be towards a recovery, although it will be over some time, has anyone else  on PW had  experience of this ailment/injury ?

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Lost my lovely cocker spaniel two months ago, two weeks previous to that he was treated for ,'vestibular syndrome' which had all the hallmarks of a stroke.  This left him with his head cocked to one side for much of the time.  (Hence my earlier post about spaniel breeds).

 

Blackpowder

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11 minutes ago, Blackpowder said:

Lost my lovely cocker spaniel two months ago, two weeks previous to that he was treated for ,'vestibular syndrome' which had all the hallmarks of a stroke.  This left him with his head cocked to one side for much of the time.  (Hence my earlier post about spaniel breeds).

 

Blackpowder

Sorry to hear of your loss..................fingers crossed for our outcome...............all the best mate.

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3 hours ago, twenty said:

Sorry to hear of your loss..................fingers crossed for our outcome...............all the best mate.

Thank you

 

Blackpowder

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Yes, I have had a few and all of them where so bad that their lives where not at their best and if you've owned enough dogs you know it is that time again and it does not get any easier.

I hope you can maintain a comfortable last few years/months for your old lab, believe me if I was there i would give her a cuddle. In the last few weeks with mine they needed reassurance.

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4 hours ago, Walker570 said:

Yes, I have had a few and all of them where so bad that their lives where not at their best and if you've owned enough dogs you know it is that time again and it does not get any easier.

I hope you can maintain a comfortable last few years/months for your old lab, believe me if I was there i would give her a cuddle. In the last few weeks with mine they needed reassurance.

Yeah I've made a right old fuss of her over the last few days, she is such an affectionate old thing and loves life, she still wants to come out with the rest of the dogs in the mornings, but at the moment a wander over the field on the lead is sufficient.................hasn't affected her love of food and treats though !

Thanks mate, all the best.

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I have not had a dog in my life since i was a lad (a long time ago) but I still remember how it affected me when i lost her.

These posts about losing or a dog suffering, health wise affects me greatly.

I feel for you.

Good luck.

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i've had two dogs which suffered vestibular syndrome,i gave them half a Sturgeron(sea sickness) tablet for 3-4 days and that sorted both dogs,i've seen too many dogs put to sleep when vets have said they have had a stroke when they have not!

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Sounds like the dog is old and suffering a bit at the moment. 

You say they are aiming for recovery but what exactly will that look like? 

 

I have seen some vets come up with all sorts as the number 1 aim is preservation of life. Whilst admirable, not everyone (vets included) share the same perspective and some would not extend a life if they consider the animal may suffer, or the quality of life has greatly declined. 

 

This may not be the time to go... but think long and hard about how you may know when it is. 

You don’t want to be in the situation where you let it go on top long at the expense of the dog. 

We owe them a dignified and pain free end. 

 

My first ever gundogs a lab and springer are with my mum at the moment and I am not looking forward to when the time comes. 

I heard that some of her litter mates have started to go recently :(. 

 

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7 hours ago, Lloyd90 said:

 

Sounds like the dog is old and suffering a bit at the moment. 

You say they are aiming for recovery but what exactly will that look like? 

 

I have seen some vets come up with all sorts as the number 1 aim is preservation of life. Whilst admirable, not everyone (vets included) share the same perspective and some would not extend a life if they consider the animal may suffer, or the quality of life has greatly declined. 

 

This may not be the time to go... but think long and hard about how you may know when it is. 

You don’t want to be in the situation where you let it go on top long at the expense of the dog. 

We owe them a dignified and pain free end. 

 

My first ever gundogs a lab and springer are with my mum at the moment and I am not looking forward to when the time comes. 

I heard that some of her litter mates have started to go recently :(. 

 

At the moment she is still full of beans, tail wagging, running to greet you, eating like a horse and as obedient as ever ( although slightly deaf), the only obvious problem is the head tilt and slight unsteadiness.

I can assure you if I thought she was suffering, or had no life, or fight in her, I would be the first to admit that the time was right to end the suffering.

I'm hoping that maybe in a few weeks time I may be able to report a noticeable recovery, if not, the time may have come, but all the advice we have had at the moment says to give her a chance to pick up.

Thanks for answering,

All the best mate.

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Years ago my springer had vestibular syndrome and it was horrible to see but with care and medication he got over it. He was around 11 at the time but he was with us until just short of his 17th birthday. 

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1 minute ago, B725 said:

Years ago my springer had vestibular syndrome and it was horrible to see but with care and medication he got over it. He was around 11 at the time but he was with us until just short of his 17th birthday. 

That's great to hear mate, thanks for replying, hopefully we will get the same result.

All the best

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This was Ross efectionaly known as Rosco P Coltrane the living legend strong powerful springer, as I said to see him with vestibular syndrome was heartbreaking but he did get over it. I hope all goes well for you. 

IMG-20150309-WA0001.jpg

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8 hours ago, twenty said:

At the moment she is still full of beans, tail wagging, running to greet you, eating like a horse and as obedient as ever ( although slightly deaf), the only obvious problem is the head tilt and slight unsteadiness.

I can assure you if I thought she was suffering, or had no life, or fight in her, I would be the first to admit that the time was right to end the suffering.

I'm hoping that maybe in a few weeks time I may be able to report a noticeable recovery, if not, the time may have come, but all the advice we have had at the moment says to give her a chance to pick up.

Thanks for answering,

All the best mate.

 

If that’s the case mate your not in a rush... take time and monitor carefully and I hope you see a full recovery :) 

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3 minutes ago, Lloyd90 said:

 

If that’s the case mate your not in a rush... take time and monitor carefully and I hope you see a full recovery :) 

thanks

5 hours ago, B725 said:

This was Ross efectionaly known as Rosco P Coltrane the living legend strong powerful springer, as I said to see him with vestibular syndrome was heartbreaking but he did get over it. I hope all goes well for you. 

IMG-20150309-WA0001.jpg

Thanks....lovely photo.

Edited by twenty

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Our old terrier had vestibular syndrome at 14. Frightened the life out of us as we thought he had a stroke. We were on holiday in the caravan in Bala. Saw the vet there who told us he would come out of it on his own and shouldn't  need any treatment. He recovered completely and had two more good years.

We finally lost him at 16. He was trotting round Llyn Brenig on the Sunday. He was a bit off on Tuesday and we had to say goodbye on Thursday.

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On 16/10/2019 at 00:43, Lloyd90 said:

 

Sounds like the dog is old and suffering a bit at the moment. 

You say they are aiming for recovery but what exactly will that look like? 

 

I have seen some vets come up with all sorts as the number 1 aim is preservation of life. Whilst admirable, not everyone (vets included) share the same perspective and some would not extend a life if they consider the animal may suffer, or the quality of life has greatly declined. 

 

This may not be the time to go... but think long and hard about how you may know when it is. 

You don’t want to be in the situation where you let it go on top long at the expense of the dog. 

We owe them a dignified and pain free end. 

 

My first ever gundogs a lab and springer are with my mum at the moment and I am not looking forward to when the time comes. 

I heard that some of her litter mates have started to go recently :(. 

 

Anyone who has owned a dog or two knows when that time comes and as said it does not get any easier. If their everyday standard of life deteriorates and they are obviously not enjoying life at all then the decision has to be made.  Don't have one now as I am approaching 80 fast and wonder who would look after and love it like me but everry dog on the shoot today got a cuddle.

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2 hours ago, loriusgarrulus said:

Our old terrier had vestibular syndrome at 14. Frightened the life out of us as we thought he had a stroke. We were on holiday in the caravan in Bala. Saw the vet there who told us he would come out of it on his own and shouldn't  need any treatment. He recovered completely and had two more good years.

We finally lost him at 16. He was trotting round Llyn Brenig on the Sunday. He was a bit off on Tuesday and we had to say goodbye on Thursday.

Good to hear these recovery stories, hopefully it will all work out ok for ours, and we can share a few more years, as you did, sorry for your loss.............thanks for replying

Edited by twenty

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11 minutes ago, Walker570 said:

Anyone who has owned a dog or two knows when that time comes and as said it does not get any easier. If their everyday standard of life deteriorates and they are obviously not enjoying life at all then the decision has to be made.  Don't have one now as I am approaching 80 fast and wonder who would look after and love it like me but everry dog on the shoot today got a cuddle.

She is full of beans at the moment, her head is still tilted, and slightly unsteady on her feet, but apart from that there is little difference, she is 14 years old, (is that 98 in dog years),but lively as ever...............fingers crossed.

There is no way she will suffer if the time comes, I'll give her a cuddle from you......all the best........thanks for replying.

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The worst bit of this is it was diagnosed as a stroke.  My older GWP had the same occur about a fortnight ago.  It’s the worst thing I have seen, 6.30 fine 7pm peed everywhere head tilted and falling over.  Vets as said and Ideopathic Vestibular Syndrome diagnosed.  The key apparently is the eyes flicking to the side that the head is tilted.  She had 3 days of not being able to stand or eat but 2 weeks on can do a slightly wobbly 2 mile walk and is eating well.  Head still tilts but that is getting less.

I hope yours continues to improve as mine seems to be.  It’s far from nice to watch but apparently according to my vet worse for us than them 

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My older collie(9 years) was diagnosed with vestibular syndrome maybe a month back now. Went out fine in the morning then by the evening couldn't stand properly to walk. Head tilted and vomiting. Long story short after a visit to the vet and given an injection and some pills told to go back in two weeks.

in the two week we think she had another episode as went to get her out her crate and she was trying to walk on the walls, head 90deg out. 

Slowly slowly she's come back round and although she's still not perfect on her feet she can go out for a run about and keep up on walks. 

Got given some pills which we were told 'like to think they do something' and we have slowly took her off them to no effects. We were also told not to get her heart rate up too much, but also not to stop her living life.

Hopefully yours can improve the same.  

Edited by Landyjoe

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On ‎20‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 06:52, al4x said:

The worst bit of this is it was diagnosed as a stroke.  My older GWP had the same occur about a fortnight ago.  It’s the worst thing I have seen, 6.30 fine 7pm peed everywhere head tilted and falling over.  Vets as said and Ideopathic Vestibular Syndrome diagnosed.  The key apparently is the eyes flicking to the side that the head is tilted.  She had 3 days of not being able to stand or eat but 2 weeks on can do a slightly wobbly 2 mile walk and is eating well.  Head still tilts but that is getting less.

I hope yours continues to improve as mine seems to be.  It’s far from nice to watch but apparently according to my vet worse for us than them 

She is steadily improving, still wobbly first thing in the morning, but head tilt has improved and she is still full of life,

It was diagnosed as Vestibular Syndrome, it was just me  guessing at a stroke, she had the eye flicking as well.

Thanks for answering,

All the best

16 hours ago, Landyjoe said:

My older collie(9 years) was diagnosed with vestibular syndrome maybe a month back now. Went out fine in the morning then by the evening couldn't stand properly to walk. Head tilted and vomiting. Long story short after a visit to the vet and given an injection and some pills told to go back in two weeks.

in the two week we think she had another episode as went to get her out her crate and she was trying to walk on the walls, head 90deg out. 

Slowly slowly she's come back round and although she's still not perfect on her feet she can go out for a run about and keep up on walks. 

Got given some pills which we were told 'like to think they do something' and we have slowly took her off them to no effects. We were also told not to get her heart rate up too much, but also not to stop her living life.

Hopefully yours can improve the same.  

Yes she is slowly improving, and still as affectionate and loving as always,

Thanks for replying, it is good to hear such a good recovery rate from  all the replies I have had here on PW.

All the best.

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On 21/10/2019 at 08:40, twenty said:

She is steadily improving, still wobbly first thing in the morning, but head tilt has improved and she is still full of life,

It was diagnosed as Vestibular Syndrome, it was just me  guessing at a stroke, she had the eye flicking as well.

Thanks for answering,

All the best

Yes she is slowly improving, and still as affectionate and loving as always,

Thanks for replying, it is good to hear such a good recovery rate from  all the replies I have had here on PW.

All the best.

How is the dog now, a lot better I hope. 

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14 hours ago, B725 said:

How is the dog now, a lot better I hope. 

Yeah, thanks for asking, she has improved dramatically, the head tilt has all but disappeared, and her unsteadiness has now gone as well.

It has been 4 weeks since she suffered the incident, and all the advice from PW members was spot on, she has shown gradual improvement as the days have passed, and it is hardly noticeable now that she has been poorly.

Thanks for your re assurance when you first responded,.......hopefully she has a few more healthy years in her.

All the best.

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