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trutta

British forend extractor lever and auto safety

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Hey gang, 

Not sure the correct nomenclature but was curious if anyone has seen this setup on a British double, it slides up and down to activate the extractor, as well as this neat auto safety. 

719-FE517-D562-4-C41-B07-B-F14-A8-F6-B68

60-F3-D5-BB-6-BD9-4037-8-D42-642-E470-F6

 

 

Edited by trutta

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1 hour ago, London Best said:

Both pretty standard stuff on English guns.

The Spanish (in particular AYA) follow the same basic layout which is a virtual copy of the early Westly Richards boxlock. As London Best has already indicated, the mechanism is all pretty standard in its form and function.

Edited by JJsDad

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Its called the extractor cam. Many gun actions were machined so they could be built up as ejector or non ejector guns . Those machined solely as non ejectors often had a solid cam formed as part of the body and have loose joint pins . 

The action show appears to be a "solid pin" , where the joint pin is is an integral part of the action  . As a result these actions always had a cam fitted either into the body and held in place with a pin , which it would have been had the gun been an ejector  , or as in this case  of a non ejector , the cam rides in the forend knuckle . It all really depends on who made the gun and how it was fitted up . Either was just as good .

The safe "range" is pretty standard and would be largely the same for a variety of safe types .

The gun action being a cam lever would mean the gun was of lower "quality " than one fitted with a Scott lever and spindle as it required less machining and fitting up and was therefore cheaper to produce .  

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1 hour ago, London Best said:

Well done, Gunman, no substitute for info straight from ‘the trade’.

Yes, totally agree. Always interested in what Gunman has to say. A mine of information and experience.

OB

Edited by Old Boggy

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Once again thanks! Would anyone like to hazard a guess or speculation? Someone had to make and sell it! 30” barrels and weighs 6.8 pounds, pretty amazing considering American doubles around the same time were 7.25 to 8lbs! 
4-CFA2-C19-85-A3-45-F7-BDD4-110849-BADA5
F72-F8-DF0-7-E77-42-E0-BA62-C05-A1-BC36-
4-FFE8643-867-C-4-B92-8-D3-F-64905090-AD
E507-F82-A-E1-FB-4-DE1-A090-0661-EBB7-F7
CAE5-F754-6-C4-E-4-BD5-A684-2-E4-F699-BD
8-D8961-BA-9-AD2-4311-98-E1-602-BF70-A46
50-A84421-5-E21-4-C22-940-A-136-EB872965
EEF200-B5-3-DBD-4-A9-D-A6-BE-57-DA85-DA8
A6-F4-FFCD-3973-4335-921-E-696-C3-FB4333
this marking was on the flats

90928838-DA6-C-409-A-8296-0-AFE62-F1-D4-

and this on the barrels next to the import marks

5-DAEB62-E-427-E-4-CF6-AE57-0-BECD213-DC

Edited by trutta

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The Anson and Deeley rocker safe puts the gun in a slightly higher bracket than the " base model " . But I would describe it as a fairly standard "trade gun". Guns like this were made in there hundreds by small and medium sized workshops for sale to the shops and for export .These shops  could buy machinings from several machinists , Philipson's and Asbury , the oft seem JA spring to mind , made up barrel sets and filed furnitures , or indeed complete barrel actions that needed to be stocked up and finished , a gun could then be built up to customer or excepted standard pattern and dimensions.

 Many will have ended up with the name of the seller engraved on the rib as that of the "maker" .

A sure sign of this will that the name is only on the rib and not on the action , as it was not practical to try to engrave on a case hardened body .

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I'm not seeing a proof mark on the flats. I imagine a trade gun (or components thereof) shipped to the US for assembly? 

 

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It wouldn’t be 1904 to 1921? No date codes are present, they came out in 22, right? 

Edited by trutta

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Not if my (failing) memory serves me right. I don’t have a reference book to hand but I think it’s the same as my  H&H which was made in 1930.

edit: I can’t see a chamber length, so I think I am mistaken and you, sir, are correct!

Edited by London Best

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20 minutes ago, London Best said:

It has proof marks on the action above he knuckle and 1 1/8 is clearly visible on the barrel flats.

quite correct - I missed the crown on the knuckle. 

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