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Wildfowling Tips


EHK-312
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I`m on again for some more advice if possible please.

I`ve recently been out twice accompanying a friend (who`s also inexperienced) on their permission trying my hand at wildfowling. We`ve sat in the same spot both times trying to conceal ourselves and waiting for the birds to come in however we haven`t seen anything even remotely close enough to take a shot at.

Both times we met at 06:00hrs in the pitch black and made our way across the marsh out to the spot, one morning a sheet of fog surrounded the marsh after a clear start and just this last Saturday it was a still calm day with fair weather again, no fog this time. Are there any particular rules of thumb to Wildfowling I should try to work with to ensure we have more of a chance to one see and also shoot at our quarry ? time of day, weather, wind direction etc ? 

I look forward to hearing from you, thanks again.

 

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1 hour ago, EHK-312 said:

I`m on again for some more advice if possible please.

I`ve recently been out twice accompanying a friend (who`s also inexperienced) on their permission trying my hand at wildfowling. We`ve sat in the same spot both times trying to conceal ourselves and waiting for the birds to come in however we haven`t seen anything even remotely close enough to take a shot at.

Both times we met at 06:00hrs in the pitch black and made our way across the marsh out to the spot, one morning a sheet of fog surrounded the marsh after a clear start and just this last Saturday it was a still calm day with fair weather again, no fog this time. Are there any particular rules of thumb to Wildfowling I should try to work with to ensure we have more of a chance to one see and also shoot at our quarry ? time of day, weather, wind direction etc ? 

I look forward to hearing from you, thanks again.

 

What are you try to shoot ??? Geese - Duck ???? what part of the country you from ???? as much information you give PW members I'm sure we can give you some general advice

Edited by 6.5x55SE
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It can be hard to learn the ways of the fowl .. and they remain elusive for many with much more experience than you!

The way I learned was to keep going out at different times, in different places .. noting what you saw and looking for patterns and trends (including tide, moon etc)

Ended up running out of shells when I eventually got lucky, and not looked back since really. 

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2 hours ago, 6.5x55SE said:

What are you try to shoot ??? Geese - Duck ???? what part of the country you from ???? as much information you give PW members I'm sure we can give you some general advice

I’m from Essex and shooting over the Crouch.
On this particular marsh it’s duck mainly wigeon, teal & mallard we haven’t seen any legal goose as of yet only Brent.

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1 hour ago, Smokersmith said:

It can be hard to learn the ways of the fowl .. and they remain elusive for many with much more experience than you!

The way I learned was to keep going out at different times, in different places .. noting what you saw and looking for patterns and trends (including tide, moon etc)

Ended up running out of shells when I eventually got lucky, and not looked back since really. 

Good advice thanks for getting back to me and I’ll give it a try. If I’m honest even on the unsuccessful trips it’s still been enjoyable being out there hearing & seeing everything come alive in the mornings but here’s to hoping to some profitable trips in the near future. 

52 minutes ago, ninjaferret said:

BUY SOME DECOYS FROM ME THEN AT LEAST YOU CAN SHOOT THEM IF NOTHING ELSE SHOWS LOL

Sounds like a plan haha, what decoys in particular do you have ? 

50 minutes ago, dipper said:

Never done much wildfowling myself.Buti picked up a old book by Ian Pitman.called(And clouds flying) it’s all about how the moon and tides affect different species of wildfowl.Worth getting a copy.

Thank you for your reply, I’ll keep my eye Out and see if I can find a copy. 

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18 minutes ago, EHK-312 said:

I’m from Essex and shooting over the Crouch.
On this particular marsh it’s duck mainly wigeon, teal & mallard we haven’t seen any legal goose as of yet only Brent.

I'd echo Smokersmith advice. But would like to add get yourself a local tide table along with some Binoculars to study what effect the tide has to the marsh and to any Duck flighting. Importantly BE safe really study and understand the Tide's don't push your luck be patience don't give up the rewards are well deserved for those who put the ground work and effort in.

Good luck keep use updated on your Journey

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8 minutes ago, EHK-312 said:

I’m from Essex and shooting over the Crouch.
On this particular marsh it’s duck mainly wigeon, teal & mallard we haven’t seen any legal goose as of yet only Brent.

If you are not already a member from a wildfowling club within a reasonable distance from your home then I strongly advise you joining one , you will be with like minded people and taken out with an experience member for at least 4/6 times depending on how much experience you have got , which by the sound of it , is not a great deal. You will be taught safety out on the marsh ,be encouraged to get a dog if you haven't already got one , gun dog lessons during the warmer months , clay pigeon shooting to brush up on your skills , some clubs have got access to vermin and pigeon shooting and by being a full member you will be insured .

Treat every time you go out as a learning curve , after a while things will start falling into place and the odd duck will start to go into your game bag. 

 

 

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All good advice and you just have to learn your marsh in all weather and tide conditions throughout the season. Even then every season is different. By way of encouragement I have shot the Solway since 1977 and now live there. I am having a **** season on the geese. Everywhere I go they either pass wide or high. Out last week in the gales shooting everywhere but not me. It’s called wildfowling and a wild goose chase for a reason. Just stick at it, enjoy being out, and when you are successful you’ll savour it even more!

good luck.

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10 hours ago, Dave at kelton said:

All good advice and you just have to learn your marsh in all weather and tide conditions throughout the season. Even then every season is different. By way of encouragement I have shot the Solway since 1977 and now live there. I am having a **** season on the geese. Everywhere I go they either pass wide or high. Out last week in the gales shooting everywhere but not me. It’s called wildfowling and a wild goose chase for a reason. Just stick at it, enjoy being out, and when you are successful you’ll savour it even more!

good luck.

+1 For this, keep plugging away,it will klick,like sea trout fishing used to be (when we had fish!)

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14 hours ago, dipper said:

Never done much wildfowling myself.Buti picked up a old book by Ian Pitman.called(And clouds flying) it’s all about how the moon and tides affect different species of wildfowl.Worth getting a copy.

A good read. Written whilst he was a POW, IIRC.

13 hours ago, EHK-312 said:

I’m from Essex and shooting over the Crouch.
On this particular marsh it’s duck mainly wigeon, teal & mallard we haven’t seen any legal goose as of yet only Brent.

Where about's on the Crouch, I know it well?

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19 hours ago, Smokersmith said:

It can be hard to learn the ways of the fowl .. and they remain elusive for many with much more experience than you!

The way I learned was to keep going out at different times, in different places .. noting what you saw and looking for patterns and trends (including tide, moon etc)

Ended up running out of shells when I eventually got lucky, and not looked back since really. 

This is great advice.

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my first season wildfowling on the marsh was out every weekend  sometimes twice a week  to not even fire a shot off never see anything with in 300 yards  away. Second season half a dozen trips same story but then started to go to other parts  new found place and was just sitting down  no camo nets no deyos got my first foreshore mallard   and was see birds and duck regular.  veen had skin of pinks right above us but they was 200 yards up

Edited by Cant hit them all
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Reconiscence & research the area know the agriculture what your target species  are feeding on, can help put you in a better position for a do.

If you live local , you have to exercise your dogs or just stretch your legs. Walking out close to your shooting grounds you can learn their orientation at perhaps a time of day you are not down there this can open up a the possibility for some sport.

  Birds move about all times of day for different reasons never discount fowling outside the typical morning evening and tide flights.

If you get on the money don't get greedy haunting a place is not good on so many levels and best to avoid this.

Think on your feet make snap yet shrewd decisions based on the day you are out, Example if you turn up one morning and the car park is suddenly rammed full of cars, yet two mornings earlier you were there alone and got two pinks. 

 You had stayed stumb, Somebody else found them and didn't.  Here is where your accumulated knowledge and research & reconiscence can  start to pay back.  Many is the time i have gone further down a marsh in anticipation for them flaring when they meet the guns, only to regroup and settle down to a shoreline crossing point away from the busy area, working out where they will cross is  no  guarantee as geese can be unpredictable. but get it right its worth the long walks and time for the knowledge you gained.

Same with ducks, If you shoot several areas/ Clubs record what you see where i keep a diary its not always helpful, but even at the time insignificant sightings can pay off.

Coastal wildfowling is the most fascinating shooting sport in the world and our country one of the best, its not about numbers its about knowing and applying that knowledge to help your efficiency. As the years tick by you get a feel for certain marshes, ok activity can change weather agriculture all play a part, getting out helps and is always worthwhile, getting to pull the trigger is a bonus.

 

 

 

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