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OK ill be realistic, read all of David gemmells books multiple times, Douglas Adams the same. Reread Robin hobbs lot as well and are excellent, going with Brent weeks and Simon scarrow. 

On the theme of hunting, Jim Corbett books are outstanding and in essence truly terrifyingly in parts, that man had balls. 

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9 hours ago, marsh man said:

We will never know how much is fact or fiction in the book , some say he got on with the other guides and then you hear about the ones who were guiding in the area couldn't stand him , so you believe what you want to believe .

I would imagine at the time it was very competitive and one or two of the locals down here went up to the wash for guided flight , it was then classed as the mecca of wild fowling and yet I can't remember anybody bringing back much , or anything at all come to that , in fact in the 60s we had up to 5000 Whitefronts using the Acle  marshes that were mainly in private hands and got shot very lightly so they would have been better off staying here .:good:

He worked for my grandfather for a time and with my father as a young man. My father said he was a bully and not very pleasant at all, but all three are passed away now so probably best left as a good tale.

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9 hours ago, Retsdon said:

Re-reading books stems from a different desire from learning. Mostly, I think, it's about being comforted, like an adult version of a child's favourite soft toy. For me, anyway, there are titles that are like old friends and when life is cack I'll take refuge in them. PG Wodehouse is my gold standard in that regard.

Agree about the comforting but I do re-read a few of my academic books as I find that I can glean a little more on occasions which helps my work.

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I've re-read Hugh Falkus, Arthur Oglesby, Colin Willocock, John Humphreys, & Moc Morgans, fishing & shooting books many times. I have also re-read Stephen Kings novels, but a personal favourite is the Regeneration trilogy by Pat Barker, and one Welsh language book I often pick up "Bywyd Cymro " (The life of a Welshman) by Gwynfor Evans.

Cheers

Aled

 

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''BB''s (Tides Ending )and Manka the Sky Gipsy)! Although I'm more of a ''Dipper inner'' and often re-read favourite chapters of various books. Ian Nialls "Gun for a goose" and Johhn Humphrey's "Time and Tide" are often re-read.

I've lost my favourite childhood book and have searched online for it without success.I read that book so many times.It was one of my mother's books from her school days. It was called "White Hawk" and about an Indian warrior who joined another tribe. The last chapter "The Happy Hunting Grounds"  has always stayed with me!

He sets off on his final journey with many people accompanying him, but long story short, the only one that made the whole journey without leaving his side was-His dog!

I'm hoping it is in my mother's attic that I will someday have to clear out.

Edited by SuperGoose75
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He worked for my grandfather for a time and with my father as a young man. My father said he was a bully and not very pleasant at all, but all three are passed away now so probably best left as a good tale.

He will always be folklore in wildfowling circles, as it is now getting on for 50 years since he passed away and we keep talking about him and still reading his book , and long may it continue .

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44 minutes ago, SuperGoose75 said:

''BB''s (Tides Ending )and Manka the Sky Gipsy)! Although I'm more of a ''Dipper inner'' and often re-read favourite chapters of various books. Ian Nialls "Gun for a goose" and Johhn Humphrey's "Time and Tide" are often re-read.

I've lost my favourite childhood book and have searched online for it without success.I read that book so many times.It was one of my mother's books from her school days. It was called "White Hawk" and about an Indian warrior who joined another tribe. The last chapter "The Happy Hunting Grounds"  has always stayed with me!

He sets off on his final journey with many people accompanying him, but long story short, the only one that made the whole journey without leaving his side was-His dog!

I'm hoping it is in my mother's attic that I will someday have to clear out.

My Mrs found me a book after ringing the British library, just told them the author and title and they said if it's in print and it's catalogue number etc. 

She bought me a kids book I had when I was 6 or 7 for my 40th birthday. 

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11 hours ago, marsh man said:

We will never know how much is fact or fiction in the book , some say he got on with the other guides and then you hear about the ones who were guiding in the area couldn't stand him , so you believe what you want to believe .

I would imagine at the time it was very competitive and one or two of the locals down here went up to the wash for guided flight , it was then classed as the mecca of wild fowling and yet I can't remember anybody bringing back much , or anything at all come to that , in fact in the 60s we had up to 5000 Whitefronts using the Acle  marshes that were mainly in private hands and got shot very lightly so they would have been better off staying here .:good:

Mr Savory had access to those Whitefronts.

One of the most evocative pieces on fowling that I have read about, was a moon flight on the marshes with both Whitefronts and Pinks in the bag. Plenty of ligger crossing involved.

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2 hours ago, SuperGoose75 said:

''BB''s (Tides Ending )and Manka the Sky Gipsy)! Although I'm more of a ''Dipper inner'' and often re-read favourite chapters of various books. Ian Nialls "Gun for a goose" and Johhn Humphrey's "Time and Tide" are often re-read.

I've lost my favourite childhood book and have searched online for it without success.I read that book so many times.It was one of my mother's books from her school days. It was called "White Hawk" and about an Indian warrior who joined another tribe. The last chapter "The Happy Hunting Grounds"  has always stayed with me!

He sets off on his final journey with many people accompanying him, but long story short, the only one that made the whole journey without leaving his side was-His dog!

I'm hoping it is in my mother's attic that I will someday have to clear out.

Hey SuperGoose75 - is this your wish?

https://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=30512662281&searchurl=pt%3Dbook%26sortby%3D20%26tn%3Dwhite%2Bhawk&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp1-_-title6

I've just received a copy of Art of good shooting based on this thread and look forwards to reading over the weekend

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When  I was around 10 years old my Dad gave me a book called "Fly Fishing is Easy" somewhere along my road through life I lost it.....I came into my office last summer and a work colleague of mine had seen the book for sale in a second hand shop for 50p, and bought it for me as a bit of a joke,....he was totally surprised (and maybe disappointed?) when I was absolutely over the moon at his purchase!

Cheers

Aled

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Mr Savory had access to those Whitefronts.

One of the most evocative pieces on fowling that I have read about, was a moon flight on the marshes with both Whitefronts and Pinks in the bag. Plenty of ligger crossing involved.

Mr Savory did have access , along with several locals who he very rarely met :hmm:

The moonlight flight could well have been from Michael Shephard book , Come Wildfowling , I have had many cups of tea from the house boat that was there base while shooting around the marshes and the estuary , when it got burnt down I salvaged the old vintage metal coat hanger that was on the inside of the door , this is now hanging up in my garage and is employed to hang the ducks and geese on , I dare say if it could talk it could tell a few yarns .:good: 

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3 minutes ago, marsh man said:

Mr Savory did have access , along with several locals who he very rarely met 

The moonlight flight could well have been from Michael Shephard book , Come Wildfowling , I have had many cups of tea from the house boat that was there base while shooting around the marshes and the estuary , when it got burnt down I salvaged the old vintage metal coat hanger that was on the inside of the door , this is now hanging up in my garage and is employed to hang the ducks and geese on , I dare say if it could talk it could tell a few yarns .:good: 

It was a piece in the pattern of wings collection of stories, I'm sure it was penned by Alan Savory, but I'm unable to check as all of my books are in boxes under my bed, as I no longer have room for the giant Ikea bookcase that was full from top to bottom of mainly shooting and fishing books.

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10 hours ago, The Mighty Prawn said:

Hey SuperGoose75 - is this your wish?

https://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=30512662281&searchurl=pt%3Dbook%26sortby%3D20%26tn%3Dwhite%2Bhawk&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp1-_-title6

I've just received a copy of Art of good shooting based on this thread and look forwards to reading over the weekend

I was fully expecting when opening that link to see other books with the same title as I've seen them when searching.

What a Surprise to find that, that indeed is the very book I was referring too🤗

It's been years since I seen it and it was a joy to see the cover and easily recognisable map of the Indians route.There was actually a companion book with the same cover only with a cowboy on front. It was nowhere near as good as this book.

I remember in the first chapter when he was wounded and alone that he survived by hunting wild ducks and geese. This always struck a chord with me as their has always been something instilled deep in me when it comes to hunting wildfowl,even at a very young age when it was unexplainable and something primitive in me.

Thank you so much for taking the trouble in seeking it out. Now that I know the Authors name I can seek it out.l won't rush into buying this one as I have an inkling it may be in the attic at home but fantastic that I have the full details now.👌👍

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11 hours ago, washerboy said:

My Mrs found me a book after ringing the British library, just told them the author and title and they said if it's in print and it's catalogue number etc. 

She bought me a kids book I had when I was 6 or 7 for my 40th birthday. 

What a fantastic birthday present. Childhood book's are important and help define us as individuals. Well done your Wife👏

I loved all the Roald Dahl books as a school child and have come across children's books from my favourite Countryside author later in life.

I missed out on a cracker 1st ed about a decade ago of a book I wanted. It had no (DJ) but was in great condition and I passed up on it and as I was overly fussy and wanted one with a DJ. Im now finding it hard to get at a sensible price.

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Hi

For nostalgia and a sense of hunting in the old days....Jim Corbett Omnibus.  Man eating tigers and leopards in India. Amazing!

Also,  Death in the Long Grass by Peter Capstick.  I've all the collection and never get tired of the writing . Highly recommended! 

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I have  my old friends that I go back to time and time again. Magician by Raymond E Feist, and  Legend by David Gemmel are probably the two books I've reread most often.  However there are many other titles I've read multiple times. When I was at school I read all the Sven Hassel books and every now and again I'll pick one of those up. The Daughter of the Empire series is another one I'll happily revisit.

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22 hours ago, Penelope said:

It was a piece in the pattern of wings collection of stories, I'm sure it was penned by Alan Savory, but I'm unable to check as all of my books are in boxes under my bed, as I no longer have room for the giant Ikea bookcase that was full from top to bottom of mainly shooting and fishing books.

Hi  Paul ....... To save you digging through your book collection I have got it sorted , you were half right , it was in the Pattern Of Wings but it was Michael Shepard from his book Come Wildfowling and not Alan Savory , although he did do a couple of chapters in the book about shooting in the area .

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2 hours ago, marsh man said:

Hi  Paul ....... To save you digging through your book collection I have got it sorted , you were half right , it was in the Pattern Of Wings but it was Michael Shepard from his book Come Wildfowling and not Alan Savory , although he did do a couple of chapters in the book about shooting in the area .

Thank you John.

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Some books ive read a few times are 

The old man and the sea ..Hemingway

Catch 22... Heller

The secret Policeman...Flan O'Brien

Puckoon...Spike Milligan

Mr Crabtree goes fishing.... read these over and over as a lad

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Found a book I read when I was doing my O levels, it was sat in an old box at the back of the class room and so I borrowed it to read between exams if I finished early. I found it again in my lads bed room, sure it's the same copy. 

Nevile shutes No highway. 

It was made into a terrible film staring Jimmy Stewart. 

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2 hours ago, VULTURE said:

The Haynes manual for my Triumph T140 🙁🙁🙁

Funny!😃 Same here Vultrure! Many many times and more out of necessity! Still got well thumbed oily copy and workshop manual. Mine was 81 reg and one of the last/few Meriden T140 ES's. Built from the parts bin by then i think! Ended up scraping the electric start and that temperamental quirky borge warner sprag clutch. To much top end tuning (compression) and  to many rebuilds without sorting the bottom end properly. All the Les Harris parts were ****! The joys of youth! Didn't learn tho. Moved on to  Harleys. First a old iron head sportster shovel heads, evo's then twin cam. One of the carbed FXDX's 1450's ( stage 2 and very quick! For a Harley ) before they all went fuel injection. Yet more manuals, but least you could work on and tune em! 😉        NB

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