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what they used to do years ago....was to get young lads to climb the trees and tie the young rooks legs to the nest with rafia and when the rooks got big enough they used to harvest them.................i think old rooks and crows can be a bit inedible...

it was very popular thing to do in the country at one time......

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1 hour ago, ditchman said:

what they used to do years ago....was to get young lads to climb the trees and tie the young rooks legs to the nest with rafia and when the rooks got big enough they used to harvest them.................i think old rooks and crows can be a bit inedible...

it was very popular thing to do in the country at one time......

They didn't have food banks years ago , I have ate some rumon things like Coots , Moorhens and a lot of the small wading birds   , but certainly not Rooks and Crows , well unless some were put in the game casseroles we have had during our shoot lunches :yes:

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Yep, I have eaten many a crow. My grandmother would make a rook pie back in the war years and rarely a crumb left over. In recent times we have been invited to rook pie evenings with a local couple...old school... and again young branchers converted into rook pie. Certainly edible but would have benefited from a little more seasoning.  I would think also very good in a mixed game pie, with the breast meats chopped along with other game....how about crow sausage ? 

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Isn't crow pie just made from the young rooks as they leave the nests and anything more mature is pretty rank?

I suspect it's not a good idea to eat scavengers like them 

Rook pie is nice enough and think it's where the "four and twenty black birds baked in a pie" comes from.

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59 minutes ago, Farmboy91 said:

Im sure I read on here before someone saying a farmer's wife made a 'crow pie' after a day shooting branchers, and it being a bit bland.

My missus could make a vindaloo bland. Blame the cook not the dish.

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3 hours ago, Farmboy91 said:

Honestly, I always thought dried wheatabix was the hardest substance known to man, until she decided to heat baked beans in it. 

She tries though bless her.

Fair does, my missus hasn't ruined any pans that I know of. Even with her signature dish of beans on toast.

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23 minutes ago, 39TDS said:

Fair does, my missus hasn't ruined any pans that I know of. Even with her signature dish of beans on toast.

To be honest I can top her burning the pans.

I used to get up 4.00 for work, first thing I would do is put the kettle on the boil then head to the bathroom. I'd do everything in the dark so I didn't disturb anyone. Done all that as usual one morning, was getting dressed and thought to myself, I can't hear the kettle boiling, you know when something doesn't feel quite right.

Carried on, got dressed went into the kitchen, flicked the light on and was hit by a wall of smoke. 

Turns out in the dark rather than putting the kettle on, id hit the switch for the hob, on top of which was a plastic tray, which had the proceeded to melt 😂 all the windows open at 4.15, in the morning, middle of winter to get rid of the smell.

She was well impressed.

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34 minutes ago, Farmboy91 said:

To be honest I can top her burning the pans.

I used to get up 4.00 for work, first thing I would do is put the kettle on the boil then head to the bathroom. I'd do everything in the dark so I didn't disturb anyone. Done all that as usual one morning, was getting dressed and thought to myself, I can't hear the kettle boiling, you know when something doesn't feel quite right.

Carried on, got dressed went into the kitchen, flicked the light on and was hit by a wall of smoke. 

Turns out in the dark rather than putting the kettle on, id hit the switch for the hob, on top of which was a plastic tray, which had the proceeded to melt 😂 all the windows open at 4.15, in the morning, middle of winter to get rid of the smell.

She was well impressed.

Is she your carer?:whistling:

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Shot a crow on Saturday so thought what the heck, better try it!

I flash fried a breast and cut a couple of thin slices off.  It tasted very nice, not as strong as pigeon but very tasty.   However, I don't think I will be eating a pile of them yet as although the taste was fine I could not for the life of me get the image of a stinky crow out of my mind as I ate it!

As others have said, I am sure some have eaten it in the past in game pies and stews and not even known it was crow.

Give it a try!

Cheers

Flipper

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Rooks are not crows! Crows eat carrion. So not an animal you'd then want to eat the flesh of. I've eaten rooks...branchers...and would eat them again at the drop of a hat. In a pie with fat back bacon to give gelatine and "body" to the pie. So young brancher rooks in a pie yes. Delicious hot and "to die for" cold. But carrion crow? Never, never, never.

Edited by enfieldspares
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