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Spent yesterday out on the bike looking for a friends lost dog, she ran off last week and has been on the loose since, few sightings each day, she's now crossed the M6 and the M61, how she's got away with that I don't know. 

I went through a few woods she might have gone to ground in, nothing but squirrels and rabbits.

Just about to go into a wood and I nearly came a cropper, just looked up in time.

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They looked like leaf cutter bees but I didn't think they swarmed like this? Got close enough took some pictures and backed up fast.

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Did you notify a bee keeper, that is a great swarm and worth a few bob.  Rarely will swarming bees want to sting you, they fill up with honey ready to start a new colony and follow the queen until she decideds where to set up home.  Yes if you crashed into it you might get stung so you had a lucky day.   The police normally keep a record of all local beekeepers willing to pick up swarms and with modern mobile phones it is handy to have a number on your phone, certainly with us being out and about in the countryside.  There is an old saying, which I think said a swarm in May will make hay, a swarm in in June .....can't remeber the jingle for that month but a swarm in July let it go by.  I know there are other local ditties as well.  The reason for a swarm in July being almost worthless is that the bees have to build up for the winter and they have less time to do it.   But that is a cracking swarm and if closer to me I would have been out with a cardboard box no problem and my beekeeper would be overjoyed.

 

Result of dog search ???

Edited by Walker570
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Get in touch with your local bee keeper, he will be grateful for a swarm that big, worth a few bob once settled into a hive.

 

You could always start bee keeping yourself, if you have somewhere for a hive.

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They will not stay there, swarms frequently rest up. The scout bees will find a new suitable location and guide the swarm, usually in the region of 20,000 bees (unless it is a secondary swarm) the queen will follow. The queen only leaves the hive twice in her life, first on her mating flight, the second when the bees swarm.

If you go back in a day or so, they will be gone. If they were to stay there, the colony would die off. They cannot survive outside.

The queen plays no part in deciding whether the colony swarms or where they go. It is the worker bees that make all of the decisions regarding the colony. The queen is purely there to lay eggs. It is a common misconception that that queen rules the hive, she doesn’t and the colony will think nothing of killing her if she fails to perform in her task.

Worker bees can raise a new queen whenever they choose by taking any fertilised egg and building a queen cell around it, they feed they larvae on Royal Jelly for a longer period and that makes her grow into a queen bee 🐝 

Edited by moondoggy
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31 minutes ago, Walker570 said:

Did you notify a bee keeper, that is a great swarm and worth a few bob.

 

30 minutes ago, old'un said:

Get in touch with your local bee keeper, he will be grateful for a swarm that big, worth a few bob once settled into a hive.

I didn't give it a thought,  I just went around it and into the wood looking for the dog, came out with a puncture 😥

55 minutes ago, twenty said:

Wow........nice swarm........hope you find the dog.

Cheers.

34 minutes ago, Walker570 said:

Result of dog search

Still out there, she's been chased by 'helpful' people a few times and is bolting as soon as she sets eyes on people unfortunately. There have been loads of people out searching, but a beagle on the run is giving everyone the slip.

8 minutes ago, moondoggy said:

They will not stay there, swarms frequently rest up. The scout bees will find a new suitable location and guide the swarm, usually in the region of 20,000 bees (unless it is a secondary swarm) the queen will follow. The queen only leaves the hive twice in her life, first on her mating flight, the second when the bees swarm.

If you go back in a day or so, they will be gone. If they were to stay there, the colony would die off. They cannot survive outside.

The queen plays no part in deciding whether the colony swarms or where they go. It is the worker bees that make all of the decisions regarding the colony. The queen is purely there to lay eggs. It is a common misconception that that queen rules the hive, she doesn’t and the colony will think nothing of killing her if she fails to perform in her task.

Worker bees can raise a new queen whenever they choose by taking any fertilised egg and building a queen cell around it, they feed they larvae on Royal Jelly for a longer period and that makes her grow into a queen bee 🐝 

Cheers.

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Thats an impressive swarm ,sisters rescue springer went on the run for 5 days no one could get near it.

belonged to an old guy so don't think it went out much.

certainly made up for it.

never left the farm  after they got it back think he had a bit of a hungry scare :)

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1 hour ago, moondoggy said:

They will not stay there, swarms frequently rest up. The scout bees will find a new suitable location and guide the swarm, usually in the region of 20,000 bees (unless it is a secondary swarm) the queen will follow. The queen only leaves the hive twice in her life, first on her mating flight, the second when the bees swarm.

If you go back in a day or so, they will be gone. If they were to stay there, the colony would die off. They cannot survive outside.

The queen plays no part in deciding whether the colony swarms or where they go. It is the worker bees that make all of the decisions regarding the colony. The queen is purely there to lay eggs. It is a common misconception that that queen rules the hive, she doesn’t and the colony will think nothing of killing her if she fails to perform in her task.

Worker bees can raise a new queen whenever they choose by taking any fertilised egg and building a queen cell around it, they feed they larvae on Royal Jelly for a longer period and that makes her grow into a queen bee 🐝 

Exactly.  I was out last week and I noticed a lot of bee activity around an old oak tree. Carefully had a look and they had settled in a hole in the trunk about two thirds of them where already in.   I was surrounded by bees but they where just interested in getting into their new home and made no move to attack me.  Unlike a hive my beekeeper has in my wood at the moment. I fear that a mouse may have got in or the hive is being attacked by wasps because they have become VERY protective. Lucky not to have been stung but a couple did hit me hard.

 

Hope that beagle is rounded up. They do have minds of their own.

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14 hours ago, moondoggy said:

They will not stay there, swarms frequently rest up. The scout bees will find a new suitable location and guide the swarm, usually in the region of 20,000 bees (unless it is a secondary swarm) the queen will follow. The queen only leaves the hive twice in her life, first on her mating flight, the second when the bees swarm.

If you go back in a day or so, they will be gone. If they were to stay there, the colony would die off. They cannot survive outside.

The queen plays no part in deciding whether the colony swarms or where they go. It is the worker bees that make all of the decisions regarding the colony. The queen is purely there to lay eggs. It is a common misconception that that queen rules the hive, she doesn’t and the colony will think nothing of killing her if she fails to perform in her task.

Worker bees can raise a new queen whenever they choose by taking any fertilised egg and building a queen cell around it, they feed they larvae on Royal Jelly for a longer period and that makes her grow into a queen bee 🐝 

Fascinating, thanks!

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Well after 9 days the beagles has been found, there was a big search on the cards for tomorrow but the area to be searched has cows and new calves in the fields.

A snap decision to do a search today,  50 people and 10 beagles went out and within 20 minutes she was found,  in the same area she had been around for days.

Now spending the night at the vets, but as you can imagine the family are thrilled. 

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12 minutes ago, Mice! said:

Well after 9 days the beagles has been found, there was a big search on the cards for tomorrow but the area to be searched has cows and new calves in the fields.

A snap decision to do a search today,  50 people and 10 beagles went out and within 20 minutes she was found,  in the same area she had been around for days.

Now spending the night at the vets, but as you can imagine the family are thrilled. 

Great news 👍

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On 14/06/2020 at 20:41, moondoggy said:

They will not stay there, swarms frequently rest up. The scout bees will find a new suitable location and guide the swarm, usually in the region of 20,000 bees (unless it is a secondary swarm) the queen will follow. The queen only leaves the hive twice in her life, first on her mating flight, the second when the bees swarm.

If you go back in a day or so, they will be gone. If they were to stay there, the colony would die off. They cannot survive outside.

The queen plays no part in deciding whether the colony swarms or where they go. It is the worker bees that make all of the decisions regarding the colony. The queen is purely there to lay eggs. It is a common misconception that that queen rules the hive, she doesn’t and the colony will think nothing of killing her if she fails to perform in her task.

Worker bees can raise a new queen whenever they choose by taking any fertilised egg and building a queen cell around it, they feed they larvae on Royal Jelly for a longer period and that makes her grow into a queen bee 🐝 

Thanks for that information very informative.

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19 hours ago, Mice! said:

Well after 9 days the beagles has been found, there was a big search on the cards for tomorrow but the area to be searched has cows and new calves in the fields.

A snap decision to do a search today,  50 people and 10 beagles went out and within 20 minutes she was found,  in the same area she had been around for days.

Now spending the night at the vets, but as you can imagine the family are thrilled. 

This is fantastic news, nothing worse than a missing member of the family

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46 minutes ago, Buckster said:

She is one lucky dog, especially as it was on the M61 where she was hit.  

Luckily it's been pretty quiet lately,  must admit I expected her to have laid up injured and not been found, found just off the slip road as well. Junc 8

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