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Shotguneddy

Rotary speeds

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Hi Ive just purchased a rotary for the first time I’ve shot over other peoples but finally decided to buy one myself after years . My question is, it came with a remote and speed controller just wondering what speeds people prefer for there own setups . I’ve watched some videos on you tube and most say almost full power. I no this probably works but personally I would of thought that a slow to medium speed would look more realistic. Opinions more than welcome thanks

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All the recommendations I have seen have been to run them fast, mine only has one setting and that is fast-ish, probably for good reason

A friend of mine who has been a pigeon guide for the last 40 years says to bring them in if the battery starts to die and it slows down, I'd trust his judgement but you have the controller, why not experiment and let us know the results.

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Always fast, around 40 revolutions a minute, when the battery start to die and it slows down it tends to spook birds.

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35 rpm for pigeons and 25 rpm for corvids.

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I found 36 rpm for pigeon and 24 rpm for corvids works best for me 😁

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Posted (edited)

always clockwise. :yes:  but it also depends on which way the pigeons are facing and what part of the country you are in and wind direction. :whistling:

Edited by old'un

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I believe that the speed is more critical than we think.  Several years ago I was shooting over laid barley, my shooting pal was quite a few  fields away, on the opposite side of a small valley, also on a laid patch of barley. He was pulling most of the birds off their flight line to his machine, which had a speed control on it. My machine was running at a fixed speed, which was slightly slower. As his battery began to die, I started to pull more and more birds to my machine . I then had the bulk of the shooting. I then saw him out at his machine as he was changing the battery.  Once more the birds switched back to him, with me pulling the odd bird, usually just after he had fired a shot. So, speed is critical, a lesson learned. I bought a speed controller the following day.

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4 minutes ago, Westley said:

I believe that the speed is more critical than we think.  Several years ago I was shooting over laid barley, my shooting pal was quite a few  fields away, on the opposite side of a small valley, also on a laid patch of barley. He was pulling most of the birds off their flight line to his machine, which had a speed control on it. My machine was running at a fixed speed, which was slightly slower. As his battery began to die, I started to pull more and more birds to my machine . I then had the bulk of the shooting. I then saw him out at his machine as he was changing the battery.  Once more the birds switched back to him, with me pulling the odd bird, usually just after he had fired a shot. So, speed is critical, a lesson learned. I bought a speed controller the following day.

You make a good point. most of the videos with rotary's happily turning in them seem slow to me.

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1 minute ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

You make a good point. most of the videos with rotary's happily turning in them seem slow to me.

I agree entirely, the most effective speeds have been quoted above, I just have a tippex marker painted on my controller, at the best speed for my machines.

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4 minutes ago, Westley said:

I agree entirely, the most effective speeds have been quoted above, I just have a tippex marker painted on my controller, at the best speed for my machines.

Me too and on the flapper for beats and interval.

Small world.:good:

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6 minutes ago, Westley said:

I agree entirely, the most effective speeds have been quoted above, I just have a tippex marker painted on my controller, at the best speed for my machines.

Do you mean my 35 and 25 or B725's 36 and 24? 

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Trial and error helped me choose the right speed  !

3 minutes ago, ditchman said:

33 1/3 & 45 and in a stiff breeze 78rpm

Now you mention it, I have to get my turntable in for repair as soon as poss. !

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16 hours ago, JDog said:

35 rpm for pigeons and 25 rpm for corvids.

Interesting thanks for all the reply’s guys, Jdog  have u had much success decoying corvids with a rotary or anyone else had much joy

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2 minutes ago, Shotguneddy said:

Interesting thanks for all the reply’s guys, Jdog  have u had much success decoying corvids with a rotary or anyone else had much joy

It is a bit hit and miss like most decoying sessions but I do remember distinctly the first time I put Jackdaws on the rotary. The field was whole cropped and there were a good number of corvids on the field when I got there. I made a hide against a wood pile and soon had some Jackdaws down. When I put two on the rotary the effect was immediate with corvids of all varieties trying to land on it or very near it. The shooting was a bit too easy.

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17 hours ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

Which direction, clockwise or anti-clockwise?

It depends if you want them going forwards or backwards

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, JDog said:

It is a bit hit and miss like most decoying sessions but I do remember distinctly the first time I put Jackdaws on the rotary. The field was whole cropped and there were a good number of corvids on the field when I got there. I made a hide against a wood pile and soon had some Jackdaws down. When I put two on the rotary the effect was immediate with corvids of all varieties trying to land on it or very near it. The shooting was a bit too easy.

Thanks, I will definitely try it some  time on the corvids I usually just use static full body decs for blacks if I’m still aloud to say that and have had more than average bags in the past but this could boost my numbers. Hoping to get out on the pigeons with it on Sunday as they are starting to hammer the barley now and we have wheat in the adjoining fields which they are staring to use now in medium sized groups, Thanks

Edited by Shotguneddy
Mistakes

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On 1 July 2020 at 19:33, Westley said:

I believe that the speed is more critical than we think.  Several years ago I was shooting over laid barley, my shooting pal was quite a few  fields away, on the opposite side of a small valley, also on a laid patch of barley. He was pulling most of the birds off their flight line to his machine, which had a speed control on it. My machine was running at a fixed speed, which was slightly slower. As his battery began to die, I started to pull more and more birds to my machine . I then had the bulk of the shooting. I then saw him out at his machine as he was changing the battery.  Once more the birds switched back to him, with me pulling the odd bird, usually just after he had fired a shot. So, speed is critical, a lesson learned. I bought a speed controller the following day.

I'm inclined to agree that the fastest speed is more likely to attract the pigeons from a distance and provided it is set upwind of the pattern, it is less likely to spook the birds. The flash of white wing bars being the attracting feature.

Once the rotary slows down it has far less 'pulling' power, in my experience anyway.

Of course, no two days are the same and experimentation is always key.

OB

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What is interesting is my this logic, none of which i am doubting, bouncers and flappers shouldn’t have enough movement/speed to work at all. 

I have been trialing a magnet and flapper (on a timer) combination and have been so impressed by the flapper iv considered buying three flappers and ditching the magnet completely. One several occasions, on different days, a pigeon has been unwilling to commit, the flapper has come on just at the right moment and bang, straight in!! 

Shooting pigeons is a strange old task!

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8 hours ago, zipdog said:

What is interesting is my this logic, none of which i am doubting, bouncers and flappers shouldn’t have enough movement/speed to work at all. 

I have been trialing a magnet and flapper (on a timer) combination and have been so impressed by the flapper iv considered buying three flappers and ditching the magnet completely. One several occasions, on different days, a pigeon has been unwilling to commit, the flapper has come on just at the right moment and bang, straight in!! 

Shooting pigeons is a strange old task!

I agree that flappers can be very useful in many situations and can be positioned in the middle of the pattern, unlike a rotary, which can on occasions spook the birds.

Good luck with your flappers and let us know how things go.

OB

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On 01/07/2020 at 19:33, Westley said:

I believe that the speed is more critical than we think.  Several years ago I was shooting over laid barley, my shooting pal was quite a few  fields away, on the opposite side of a small valley, also on a laid patch of barley. He was pulling most of the birds off their flight line to his machine, which had a speed control on it. My machine was running at a fixed speed, which was slightly slower. As his battery began to die, I started to pull more and more birds to my machine . I then had the bulk of the shooting. I then saw him out at his machine as he was changing the battery.  Once more the birds switched back to him, with me pulling the odd bird, usually just after he had fired a shot. So, speed is critical, a lesson learned. I bought a speed controller the following day.

Though I believe a decent speed works well, I think what you have described would be classed as a coincidence. 

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49 minutes ago, motty said:

Though I believe a decent speed works well, I think what you have described would be classed as a coincidence. 

We will never know, BUT I bought a speed controller afterwards  !

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I found using a speed control was as unpredictable as using the magnet , some days the magnet will live up to it's name and another day it can be the best scare crow on the field as nothing will come near it , this is exactly the same with the speed control , one day you will have it running at a certain speed and the pigeons will want to land on it , then a few days later you can set it again at the same speed and the pigeons will give it a wide berth , over the years I had burnt the fuse out of two or three when it was going at a slower speed , this might had been the fault of the home made magnet , while waiting for a replacement I used mine with it running at the set speed , to be honest I didn't notice any difference so when the new one came I flogged it on the forum and never used one since ,  

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