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Hi...got 2 ton of wheat coming tomorrow for general pheasant duck feed....last season transferred to white plastic buckets with an airtight lid, after a couple months started to open buckets and the what's was mouldy...am I storing it incorrectly...thought airtight containers would be the best or does it tend to 'sweat'...any help or pointers as to long term storage would be appreciated...thanks...atb....misser

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17 minutes ago, misser said:

Hi...got 2 ton of wheat coming tomorrow for general pheasant duck feed....last season transferred to white plastic buckets with an airtight lid, after a couple months started to open buckets and the what's was mouldy...am I storing it incorrectly...thought airtight containers would be the best or does it tend to 'sweat'...any help or pointers as to long term storage would be appreciated...thanks...atb....misser

Ideal you would be better with some breathable hessian sacks if you have somewhere dry to keep it undercover, this way you can get some air blowing through it. However if your supplier is selling you wheat above 20 moisture there is chance it might still go mouldy. It's key to have it stored dry. You’d probably be best getting your wheat in October if you can. This way you know its come from a heap rather than straight off combine which could be in a wet crop!

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Hi misser when we sell wheat and barley to meet specs of  grain merchants it has to be below 15.5% moisture, in my experience grain dose not store well after 17% unless you regularly blow air through it. If dry it will store perfectly in a sealed container I have had some barley in a container for nearly two years up at a inaccessible flight pond the other thing you will have to watch for is weevils and corn mites they will create heat as they breed causing to corn to heat tremendously and spoiling it.Keeping the corn as cold as possible out of the sunlight will help control bugs they can’t breed below 12 degrees  if memory’s correct

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The wheat was too moist when you stored it. To store it the way you did it must have a moisture content of below 13%. Most combined wheat straight off the field is 18% or more.

Ensure that what you buy is dry enough, ie. no more than 13%.

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If you can as get as much as poss’ out on the shoot (i.e in to feeders), then it has less chance of issues. In other words ‘in store’ and ‘in use’ all in one. Big feeders are great for this - as long as they are stable, watertight and regularly checked / unblocked etc. We tend to get 2 or 3 tonnes out in one visit - and do this just a few times in a season We do store some wheat bagged up in metal drums,  but not very much. 
Hope that helps - good luck!

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thanks gents for all the informative replies....i think the last lot must have been damp to start with...will try to improve storage conditions ie keep it cooler and try to put as much out as possible to start with...thanks again, a lot of useful information in all the replies....atb...misser 

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We have three large green plastic tanks that held fuel oil. Cut a doorway in end these then steam cleaned out. They hold about 1 1/2 ton each and we normally have some left over for the next season so the barley keeps ok. 

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18 hours ago, Stimo22 said:

We have three large green plastic tanks that held fuel oil. Cut a doorway in end these then steam cleaned out. They hold about 1 1/2 ton each and we normally have some left over for the next season so the barley keeps ok. 

 

18 hours ago, Stimo22 said:

We have three large green plastic tanks that held fuel oil. Cut a doorway in end these then steam cleaned out. They hold about 1 1/2 ton each and we normally have some left over for the next season so the barley keeps ok. 

how do you fill them and stop water getting in?

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We cut a square hole in one end about 18" square and put the door back on with a top hinge. We then have a rubber sheet covering the door to keep it waterproof.

We bag up our barley and just pour in the end

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