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What is your go too method for pigeon shooting I tried maintained lead  but swing through seems to work best but after the other day maybe pull away is the best for me so just wondered what the majority use.. cheers in advance 

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21 minutes ago, Jacko3275 said:

What is your go too method for pigeon shooting I tried maintained lead  but swing through seems to work best but after the other day maybe pull away is the best for me so just wondered what the majority use.. cheers in advance 

Depends on the bird really, roost and flight shooting you could find yourself either snap shooting through the branches or almost shooting driven style swinging through them. For me anything at 30yards plus is nearly always going to be swing through to make sure im on the right line

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Gun fit is reasonable think it may need a little mor drop but that’s for an expert to decide carts in the last video are Eley hv pigeon 32g 6 fibre only Use them as I run out and the nearest farm supplies only had them in .. chokes are 1/2 & 3/4 

5 minutes ago, kenholland said:

doe's your gun fit you ? what chokes do you use and cartridge, in your vid , have you patterned your gun.

My favoured cart is 30g 6 plastic but at the minute stock in my RFD is what the rep can deliver also I have ordered another choke so I’ll be shooting half n half when that comes 

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I have no idea .what method i use .i dont analize it .i see the bird and get in front some how and fire .i seem to kill plenty of birds with a very good hit rate .

Though i do tend to keep my birds sub 35 yds irrespective of calibre .

With shorter ranges the lead required is very small and as such dosnt seem to favour one method over another .

Maybe i use different styles depending on how the bird presents .? 

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12 minutes ago, Ultrastu said:

I have no idea .what method i use .i dont analize it .i see the bird and get in front some how and fire .i seem to kill plenty of birds with a very good hit rate .

Though i do tend to keep my birds sub 35 yds irrespective of calibre .

With shorter ranges the lead required is very small and as such dosnt seem to favour one method over another .

Maybe i use different styles depending on how the bird presents .? 

👍👍👍

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In a nut shell. 
 

I mount just in front of the bird, pull away until the picture looks right and fire, keeping the gun going. I have no idea if this is a good method but it seems to work for me. If I over think it my shooting goes to pot. I always shoot best when I have a clear head and do not think about the shot. I do struggle with incoming/ driven birds, I tend to adjust myself to make them crossers.

 

As an aside I use 28g 7s through 1/2 and 3/4 choke. 
 

Recently I have been to rubbish at reading flight lines so have had naff all to shoot any way!

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3 minutes ago, Clodhopper said:

In a nut shell. 
 

I mount just in front of the bird, pull away until the picture looks right and fire, keeping the gun going. I have no idea if this is a good method but it seems to work for me. If I over think it my shooting goes to pot. I always shoot best when I have a clear head and do not think about the shot. I do struggle with incoming/ driven birds, I tend to adjust myself to make them crossers.

 

As an aside I use 28g 7s through 1/2 and 3/4 choke. 
 

Recently I have been to rubbish at reading flight lines so have had naff all to shoot any way!

If I start thinking about the shot that’s when I start doing everything wrong and the get frustrated and start thinking about it more ... we will have to get Jdog to sort us out to shoot together again 

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To shoot well you need to have a few techniques in your armoury. Different situations will favour different types of shot. You can’t really snap shoot with maintained lead on a bird bursting over from behind your hide and through the next tree. Your eye needs to learn and it become subconscious. It’s a bit like driving a car and consciously thinking about how many °s you need to rotate the steering wheel etc. 

I find on busy days I shoot well, when I don’t have time to dwell on last miss. Yesterday started very fast, 6 birds with first 7 cartridges. Then it slowed down and my shooting went south. All the easy birds killed but kept “measuring lead” and being indecisive on the long birds, waiting to see if they would come in. On a fast day you wouldn’t worry about those that flight past, either kill it at range or leave it - but on slow days they mess with your head. 

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4 minutes ago, Ultrastu said:

I think if your shooting clays then its easier to adopt a style and see it in action .

But a bird that jinks and changes direction fast and slow  is a totally different beast.

 

That sums it up , there isn't any sure way in telling somebody how to hit them as they can create every shot in the book and throughout the day you can get a variety of shots , the surest way is spending as much time in the hide as possible and you start to read what the pigeon is going to do , using dead birds as decoys and setting them up as realistic as possible you can often tell when the bird is committed , you are then one step ahead and can hold your fire till you are happy to take your shot , going the other end of the scale when rotaries are used the pigeons will often take evasive action when coming into range , this will then make the shot more difficult , nobody can hit everyone you take on but the more you do the better you will become , don't get to carried away with chokes , gun fit , cartridges used , barrel lengths and a number of other suggestions that will crop up , all good advice but can often be used as excuses for bad shooting .

GOOD LUCK and keep at it .

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1 very good tip is .

Dont mount your gun too early .i used to (first starting out ) follow the incoming bird from miles away (ok so maybe 100 yds ) by the time the bird is in range the gun feels heavier in your hand and you have had 8 seconds of thinking about lead and methods. 

I now mount the gun almost as late as possible  say around sub 40 yds and shoot on average when he is at 20 - 30 yds there is virtually no time for mind games  this way .it also cuts down hide movement  

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1 minute ago, Ultrastu said:

1 very good tip is .

Dont mount your gun too early .i used to (first starting out ) follow the incoming bird from miles away (ok so maybe 100 yds ) by the time the bird is in range the gun feels heavier in your hand and you have had 8 seconds of thinking about lead and methods. 

I now mount the gun almost as late as possible  say around sub 40 yds and shoot on average when he is at 20 - 30 yds there is virtually no time for mind games  this way .it also cuts down hide movement  

I agree completely, wait until you want to kill to make a single move. Better for shooting, as the mount is part of the swing, and also less likely to spook the birds. 

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25 minutes ago, Jacko3275 said:

If I start thinking about the shot that’s when I start doing everything wrong and the get frustrated and start thinking about it more ... we will have to get Jdog to sort us out to shoot together again 

Yes I enjoyed our last outing. I have a few to go at but cannot seem to make a good decision regarding lines. Keep thinking I have sussed them out only for them to out wit me which is not that difficult!

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3 minutes ago, Clodhopper said:

Yes I enjoyed our last outing. I have a few to go at but cannot seem to make a good decision regarding lines. Keep thinking I have sussed them out only for them to out wit me which is not that difficult!

I am no better I find them but the day after they are not where they should be 

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15 hours ago, Jacko3275 said:

I am no better I find them but the day after they are not where they should be 

Yes same happens to me, As to lead well the more you think about what your doing the worse it gets, snap shooting gives you no time to think and confidence and ability comes to the fore.

As a rule I just yous natural lead ie judge speed and line and put the shot in front accordingly. 

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With pigeons you`re presented with every target in the book so to speak! You need to have a pretty comprehensive package of techniques  to deal with this. If you`re struggling, best get to a clay ground offering toughish sporting targets and shoot a lot of targets that you think represent your quarry and shoot lots of them .Gun down without question!! This will at least give you a chance to evaluate what you are doing with repetative targets and allow some controlled analysis which is difficult on live quarry .HTH.    We still all miss them though!!!!

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depends on the target and what's happening on the day. For close-ish birds - 30 yards or so swing through fire and keep swinging.

I had a day where birds were crossing at 50 paces and I found five feet maintained lead did the job every time, another day 10-12feet with tighter chokes maintained was very effective.

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