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Vintage air rifles,


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some of the older BSA's are fine..you have to start off with a good one...and then have it fettled...........if you are plinking in the garden...then the heavier HW range might be better..still very accurate without being worked on......

i fetteled both my BSA and HW

merc fin strap 001tn_.JPG

rats and stuff 005tn_.JPG

niges puffer 007tn_.JPG

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Light Pattern or Standard Pattern. The .177 calibre ones tend to be the most accurate. If you want one that's even more accurate than the superb accuracy they have anyway? Then buy one that's had a flip up rearsight fixed to the butt. Never overlook that the guys that used this for that great pub sport of bell target shooting were shooting for money. If someone went to the trouble of spending some of that money on a rearsight that means that rifle will be seriously accurate.

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8 hours ago, London Best said:

When the OP said, “older BSA’s”, I think he meant pre WW2 or even pre WW1.

I have an old bsa ultra mk1 from around 2005  and a mk1 bsa scorpion from even earlier  .

Is that the sort of thing you were thinking ? 

They may not be ancient but I collect them as that era means the most to me .

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9 hours ago, Ultrastu said:

I have an old bsa ultra mk1 from around 2005  and a mk1 bsa scorpion from even earlier  .

Is that the sort of thing you were thinking ? 

They may not be ancient but I collect them as that era means the most to me .

The thread title “Vintage Air Rifles”.
2005 may seem old to some, but it is hardly vintage.

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@ snarepeg: 

That looks a nice example. 1930’s model. 
I have a small collection of BSA spring air rifles dating from 1905 to 1965. I think there are 18 altogether. Eleven of them are pre 1939 with six of those being pre WW1. Every one is different.  Some are very nice condition and some have suffered 100 plus years of farm use, but all still work.

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43 minutes ago, London Best said:

@ snarepeg: 

That looks a nice example. 1930’s model. 
I have a small collection of BSA spring air rifles dating from 1905 to 1965. I think there are 18 altogether. Eleven of them are pre 1939 with six of those being pre WW1. Every one is different.  Some are very nice condition and some have suffered 100 plus years of farm use, but all still work.

What sort of power were they designed for as new? Compared with todays springers.

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36 minutes ago, London Best said:

@ snarepeg: 

That looks a nice example. 1930’s model. 
I have a small collection of BSA spring air rifles dating from 1905 to 1965. I think there are 18 altogether. Eleven of them are pre 1939 with six of those being pre WW1. Every one is different.  Some are very nice condition and some have suffered 100 plus years of farm use, but all still work.

Yes.

there are some real dogs about from that era, but would say this has had very little use.

its still got its original screws, not molested much, (usually caused by wrong size/type screwdriver.)

its smooth cocking, very positive sear sound engagement.

it shoots at about 10 ft/lb, very crisp trigger let of not HW record but adequate for its age.

have shot literally 1000s of rabbits with one in the early 50s before mixie came.

its a time capsule to when we were a manufacturing nation of quality items..👍🇬🇧🇬🇧

 

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I can’t compare to your thousands of rabbits but I have shot a few with some of mine, just to prove they can still cut the mustard. They really are amazingly accurate. I always wanted pare-war BSA but never owned one until 2010, when I had been shooting 50 years.

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So, in process of zeroing it, not bad at 20 yards with a gun about my age and my eyes not as they were with open sights.

shot at 20 yards resting in a fashion, the Ely wasp are covered in oxidation.

low right so back sighttap  out of error a tad and elevate. 👍🇬🇧

IMG_3102.JPG

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I have used several of mine for bell target shooting and there is no bother putting a pellet through a 3/8 inch hole at 7 yards from an unsupported standing position........once you get in practice. 
My favourite is a first batch BSA from 1905 with a home made peep sight.

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If we go into lockdown? It's something to try, but not much room for 22 to get thru😊

Will have to get some good pellets, hobby-make a nice hole, but 5.5 into 5.6 idont think helps to the finer degree of bell target.

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2 hours ago, snarepeg said:

If we go into lockdown? It's something to try, but not much room for 22 to get thru😊

Will have to get some good pellets, hobby-make a nice hole, but 5.5 into 5.6 idont think helps to the finer degree of bell target.

.22 not allowed for bell target comps.

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