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We recently acquired a BGE from a family member for a significant reduction in what they cost :)

 

Now we just need to find a local butcher who does the cuts of meat that lend to going in low and slow for a long period of time. Can anyone recommend any certain cuts of meat and recipes that are worth a try? 

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My favorite is brisket.  Well trimmed and then give it low and slow for 10-12hrs basting every hour or so.  Pull up Barbecue Pit Boys on youtube, they have some great rubs.

I marinate mine at least overnight, then set it at about 8am and it will be reay at 6pm, the last hour I just let the temperature run down so it is resting.

Edited by Walker570
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3 hours ago, WelshAndy said:

I’ve just googled this and holly carp I hope you had a decent reduction...

Expensive much. 
 

But back to your original question - ask your butcher for a tomahawk steak 😎


Cost me less than a throw away ;) 

 

Not sure steak lends itself to being slow cooked for 8-12 hours 🤷‍♂️

3 hours ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

Do they come with an attendant to do the cooking?

I’ wouldn’t trust the Mrs to do it, I want to eat the food not throw it in the bin. 

2 hours ago, Walker570 said:

My favorite is brisket.  Well trimmed and then give it low and slow for 10-12hrs basting every hour or so.  Pull up Barbecue Pit Boys on youtube, they have some great rubs.

I marinate mine at least overnight, then set it at about 8am and it will be reay at 6pm, the last hour I just let the temperature run down so it is resting.


Thank you :) I’ll try and get over the butchers this week and get one 

3 hours ago, Shearwater said:

Easy simple one is 'beer butt chicken' ( top tip no more than a 1/3 of a can of beer/larger as it will bubble over

Thanks mate 👍🏻

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I do pork shoulder on my kamado. Takes several hours (up to eight) depending on joint size.

Mix your own rub and rub the joint all over. Leave over night.

Put the joint in the kamado at 180 degrees centigrade over a tray of water.

Keep the kamado closed. Used a wired meat thermometer to monitor the internal temperature of the joint so you avoid opening the kamado too much.

I recommend the book Hot Coals for learning kamado cooking.

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I've got the Aldi version and it's just as good - Kamado/Green Egg - They're just 2 ceramic pots on top of each other with adjustable airflow. Having said that, i LOVE mine!!

It's all about temperature control, air flow and smoke

Best cuts would be pork shoulder for pulled pork, pork ribs (Look up 3-2-1 method), beef ribs (jacobs ladder) and the holy grail - Brisket!! There are lots of specialist barbecue bitchers around, but may i suggest while you're finding your feet, that you don't spend a fortune on something that ends up like dried leather. You'll need to be able to learn how your Egg reacts to and holds temperature. 

Don't worry about beer can chicken, just put the chicken on and use your deflector plate to hold the temperature down for low and slow, or don't use it and open the air vents for a crispy roasted delight. With everything fully open, you can make a really good tikka

Ceramics can go from less than 100F to well over 450, so you have a smoker, a grill, a regular over and a tandoor, all in one package

Top tip though - Don't wait for all the charcoal to be burning - Once it hits almost the temperature you want, start closing the airflow down

Stuff to buy: 

Good Charcoal - Get the best you can buy. You don't want the smoky rubbish that the supermarkets and garages sell

Smoking wood - I'd recommend apple, pear, cherry or plum. Get into hickory, oak and mesquite some way down the line

Rubs - Experiment with your own because it's great fun, but take a look at Angus and Oink - Good quality and last forever

Gloves - Get a pair of welders mitts to move the meat around

Eco firelighters - Wood shavings and wax balls - Because of the vortex and airflow, you only need 1 to light the Egg

Remote digital thermometer - Stick it in your meet and walk away, returning when you hear the beep that tells you that it's the right temperature

I've used mine, pretty much daily during lockdown and i absolutely love it - Enjoy!!

 

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10 hours ago, Fatcatsplat said:

I've got the Aldi version and it's just as good - Kamado/Green Egg - They're just 2 ceramic pots on top of each other with adjustable airflow. Having said that, i LOVE mine!!

It's all about temperature control, air flow and smoke

Best cuts would be pork shoulder for pulled pork, pork ribs (Look up 3-2-1 method), beef ribs (jacobs ladder) and the holy grail - Brisket!! There are lots of specialist barbecue bitchers around, but may i suggest while you're finding your feet, that you don't spend a fortune on something that ends up like dried leather. You'll need to be able to learn how your Egg reacts to and holds temperature. 

Don't worry about beer can chicken, just put the chicken on and use your deflector plate to hold the temperature down for low and slow, or don't use it and open the air vents for a crispy roasted delight. With everything fully open, you can make a really good tikka

Ceramics can go from less than 100F to well over 450, so you have a smoker, a grill, a regular over and a tandoor, all in one package

Top tip though - Don't wait for all the charcoal to be burning - Once it hits almost the temperature you want, start closing the airflow down

Stuff to buy: 

Good Charcoal - Get the best you can buy. You don't want the smoky rubbish that the supermarkets and garages sell

Smoking wood - I'd recommend apple, pear, cherry or plum. Get into hickory, oak and mesquite some way down the line

Rubs - Experiment with your own because it's great fun, but take a look at Angus and Oink - Good quality and last forever

Gloves - Get a pair of welders mitts to move the meat around

Eco firelighters - Wood shavings and wax balls - Because of the vortex and airflow, you only need 1 to light the Egg

Remote digital thermometer - Stick it in your meet and walk away, returning when you hear the beep that tells you that it's the right temperature

I've used mine, pretty much daily during lockdown and i absolutely love it - Enjoy!!

 

 

 

We looked 3 dry aged rib eye steaks on the egg tonight, I asked the Butcher for the most aged ones he had. They were absolutely beautiful, looked for 6 minutes total with the egg sitting around 200c ... In future I would get the egg up to around 300c and have more of a char on the outside of the steak. 

The steak and corn were excellent but I will try and improve in the future. 

 

I also threw a couple cooking apples wrapped in foil into it, and an hour after dinner they had turned completely soft, threw some warmed up custard over them, beautiful. 

 

 

I have been to Costco today, and bought a Brisket, some BBQ ribs and chicken wings ... we are having some friends over on Thursday (less than 6 due to Covid!) and I am going to try and do the Brisket and Ribs in the egg, and I will just whack the wings in the oven. 

 

Got any good recipes for the brisket? 

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Well  I make a mix up myself of brown sugar, salt black pepper paprika and because I like peppery things I include a few dry pepper flakes.... celery salt also works well in the mix.. It is all down to personal taste.  I smear the outside of the brisket with mustard which helps retain the rub, then wrap in foil and stick it in the fridge for at least 24hrs sometime 72hrs.  I make up a similar mix with some olive oil and Worcester sauce for basting.  I throw a few chunks of wood which have been soaking in water for about an hour onto the charcoal.    Check and baste every hour or so and wrap it in foil after about three hours when it has built up that nice dark crust on the outside. I take the foil off about an hour before I serve it and the heat will have dropped away.

To be honest it is a bit trial and error at first but I have never had any that was not devoured in fact the first I ever did one friend commented as I carved it that either I had a very sharp knife or the brisket was very tender. Both actually.

16 minutes ago, Lloyd90 said:

 

 

We looked 3 dry aged rib eye steaks on the egg tonight, I asked the Butcher for the most aged ones he had. They were absolutely beautiful, looked for 6 minutes total with the egg sitting around 200c ... In future I would get the egg up to around 300c and have more of a char on the outside of the steak. 

The steak and corn were excellent but I will try and improve in the future. 

 

I also threw a couple cooking apples wrapped in foil into it, and an hour after dinner they had turned completely soft, threw some warmed up custard over them, beautiful. 

 

 

I have been to Costco today, and bought a Brisket, some BBQ ribs and chicken wings ... we are having some friends over on Thursday (less than 6 due to Covid!) and I am going to try and do the Brisket and Ribs in the egg, and I will just whack the wings in the oven. 

 

Got any good recipes for the brisket? 

 

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The apples stay whole with a nice but dam hot jam centre, that's how my mum did them for us kids, the steak looks grand .

Just now, B725 said:

The apples stay whole with a nice but dam hot jam centre, that's how my mum did them for us kids, the steak looks grand .

Oh and make your own custard its not hard better than the tinned stuff.

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38 minutes ago, moondoggy said:

I baked this in the kamado

E39D25BE-D132-4B04-9393-B23B8CFDE6EC.jpeg.5f6351fa5ae602a30e1c861c7c8ac146.jpeg

 

I'm off the wheat and gluten 😞 gives me bad stomach ... however I've lost almost a stone and can enjoy lots of delicious cooked meats and other carbs so it ain't all bad. 

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Brisket - You've chosen the hardest joint to get right. There's not a lot of middle ground. It's either great or it ain't!!

Keep it simple - A little salt and a lot of pepper and a whole bunch of time

If it's a rolled brisket, unroll it and if the fat cap is more than half an inch or so, give it a trim, but don't go too mad - You need fat.

Get the Egg to 225F (get used to Fahrenheit for BBQ purposes!!) and stick it on unwrapped. Once it hits 150F, take a look and if you're happy with the bark, wrap it in double layer foil with a few spoons of beef stock and then back in the smoke until it hits 200F internal - You may get a stall where it just sticks at a temperature for ages - Don't worry - It will get there eventually, but it might take all day to do so - 8 hours+ for a brisket is not unusual. I tend to time it so I wrap it just before bedtime and it's ready for the morning. 

When it's done, keep it wrapped and warm to really rest up - If you can get it so it wobbles when you shake it, you've cracked it!

 

Good luck

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1 hour ago, Fatcatsplat said:

Brisket - You've chosen the hardest joint to get right. There's not a lot of middle ground. It's either great or it ain't!!

Keep it simple - A little salt and a lot of pepper and a whole bunch of time

If it's a rolled brisket, unroll it and if the fat cap is more than half an inch or so, give it a trim, but don't go too mad - You need fat.

Get the Egg to 225F (get used to Fahrenheit for BBQ purposes!!) and stick it on unwrapped. Once it hits 150F, take a look and if you're happy with the bark, wrap it in double layer foil with a few spoons of beef stock and then back in the smoke until it hits 200F internal - You may get a stall where it just sticks at a temperature for ages - Don't worry - It will get there eventually, but it might take all day to do so - 8 hours+ for a brisket is not unusual. I tend to time it so I wrap it just before bedtime and it's ready for the morning. 

When it's done, keep it wrapped and warm to really rest up - If you can get it so it wobbles when you shake it, you've cracked it!

 

Good luck

 

I think I am going to leave the Brisket off this Thursday's BBQ menu as I am hoping to get out and shoot some pheasants in the morning with Ted (my dog), being first day of the season. 

 

I won't be able to give it the attention it seems to deserve. I think I will sub the brisket out for some dry aged beef burgers. So burgers, wings and BBQ wings should do it.

 

 

I will then get the Brisket on another cook on it's own, doing a low and slow all nighter if need be. I want to see that Brisket wobble :D lol. 

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The FatCat has it nailed. I don't do the wobble bit but all his other suggestions are top hole.  You just need patience and let it cook slowly and I think 8hrs is minimum.

I did buy a rolled brisket from Aldi and it looked good as is, so I left it rolled and like all the meat I buy from Aldi it turned out perfect with all our guests asking for seconds.

Good idea to be there to tend it the first time and as said I do baste mine a few times. 

That bread looks awesome.

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On 29/09/2020 at 22:46, Fatcatsplat said:

Brisket - You've chosen the hardest joint to get right. There's not a lot of middle ground. It's either great or it ain't!!

Keep it simple - A little salt and a lot of pepper and a whole bunch of time

If it's a rolled brisket, unroll it and if the fat cap is more than half an inch or so, give it a trim, but don't go too mad - You need fat.

Get the Egg to 225F (get used to Fahrenheit for BBQ purposes!!) and stick it on unwrapped. Once it hits 150F, take a look and if you're happy with the bark, wrap it in double layer foil with a few spoons of beef stock and then back in the smoke until it hits 200F internal - You may get a stall where it just sticks at a temperature for ages - Don't worry - It will get there eventually, but it might take all day to do so - 8 hours+ for a brisket is not unusual. I tend to time it so I wrap it just before bedtime and it's ready for the morning. 

When it's done, keep it wrapped and warm to really rest up - If you can get it so it wobbles when you shake it, you've cracked it!

 

Good luck

Fat cats plat has nailed it.  Everything about good low and slow bbq/smoking is cooking to the internal temperature of the meat rather than timings.  That stall in temp that he mentioned is key, that’s the time that the collagen/connective tissue breaks down and results in that super tender beef or pork that can be pulled.  A 4lb pork shoulder could take 6 hours to perfection one day, but the next 4lb shoulder you cook may take 7 so you really need to get a remote probe type thermometer where you can measure the temp of the  meat as it cooks.

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In cooking any meat a temp gauge is an essential bit of kit. For instance for years my wife would cook a joint far too long because she wanted to ensure the meat was cooked through, resulting in dried out joints. Now we have a probe we know exactly when that meat is cooked to our liking.  Cheap bit of kit as well.

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I cooked a brisket but not quite like above, I cooked it for an hour in the egg, then placed it in a foil tray with a sauce made of ketchup, beef stock and herbs and spices. Beef was then cooked for a further 3 hours covered and sealed in foil... it shredded (well fell apart) when taken out and was a massive hit with the guests :) 

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