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That at any point anyone said that the way to train a dog not to jump up was to knee it. 

Anyway I’m too tired to carry this on, been out shooting and working the dogs since 4am. The flight was at high tide - one retrieve was a wigeon blind over the main channel in almost pitch black. 

Edited by WalkedUp
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55 minutes ago, WalkedUp said:

That at any point anyone said that the way to train a dog not to jump up was to knee it. 

Anyway I’m too tired to carry this on, been out shooting and working the dogs since 4am. The flight was at high tide - one retrieve was a wigeon, blind over the main channel in almost pitch black. 

Look what you can't seem to grasp is what you did, like I said earlier keeing a dog in the guts is no way to train a dog so we agree there. 

What's really gripped me with your original post is you either don't understand or don't care about the consequences of your actions, if you really are any good at training dogs you'll agree that negative training is not as good as positive training if appropriate and that negative training, particularly where phisical chastisement is used should only be delivered at the correct time and just as important, when you're sure the dog understands what it's for, the dog you booted has probably never been told off for jumping up before and almost certainly wouldn't understand what it got a knee for, the best that could be hoped for with what you did, that by chance it understood it got a knee for jumping up, if it did it would be sheer luck as you couldn't know that as you'd only just met the dog, just as likely the dog might now associate new guests who enter the house as people to fear, at best the dog might avoid them, but in a particularly dominant dog, as some English bulldogs are, it might decide to get the first bite in next time, or in a timid dog, you could have caused nervous aggression, the point is, it would be impossible to tell what the outcome of your actions would be when you chose to do what you did. You've then got the cheek to moan about others dogs with behavioural issues and say you would put bullets in them, when it's actions like yours that often cause them, I've seen it time and again and I have worked with many dogs who've got issues because of people like you. You posted on here all pleased with what you did and proclaim to be an excellent dog trainer, you either haven't a clue or don't care and if you can't see that there's little point in us continuing to discuss it as your obviously never going to learn or just don't care. 

Edited by 12gauge82
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  • Zapp changed the title to Dog goes ballistic removed posts
1 hour ago, 12gauge82 said:

in a particularly dominant dog, as some English bulldogs are, it might decide to get the first bite in next time

If this is an indication that the dog is dangerous (as we both agree) the owner should have the guts to have it destroyed.

As you point out I was lucky to avoid being bitten by an out of control dog, fortunately I knew how to protect myself and control the situation.

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2 hours ago, WalkedUp said:

If this is an indication that the dog is dangerous (as we both agree) the owner should have the guts to have it destroyed.

As you point out I was lucky to avoid being bitten by an out of control dog, fortunately I knew how to protect myself and control the situation.

Now your making things up to defend what you did. Like I said I'm wasting my time, next time you decide to give out dog training advice I hope others on the forum read this thread as like I said in the beginning, you haven't the first clue. 

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9 minutes ago, 12gauge82 said:

Now your making things up to defend what you did. Like I said I'm wasting my time, next time you decide to give out dog training advice I hope others on the forum read this thread as like I said in the beginning, you haven't the first clue. 

Exactly! What dog training advice??? That’s the whole point of this tedious debate.... this only exists inside your imagination. 

You are entitled to your unconventional opinions on dog-love,  but it is becoming very wearisome if you are unwilling to discuss what was said rather than what you have decided was said to meet your agenda. 

As evidenced above it is very easy (and very pointless) to do so. 

4 minutes ago, 12gauge82 said:

Just to add, more evidence you haven't a clue, there's a massive difference between a dog with a dominant temperament and an aggressive dog. 

You can class them differently but whatever “label” you give to excuse aggressive behaviour, they will all get the same treatment if they jump up at strangers. 

Edited by WalkedUp
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10 minutes ago, 12gauge82 said:

Just to add, more evidence you haven't a clue, there's a massive difference between a dog with a dominant temperament and an aggressive dog. 

So when faced with a mouthfull of cannie teeth what would you do? My Mrs while trying to get my Springer out of the way of a snarling German shepherd ended up scratched and her blouse ripped and my dog frightened by it. After the same dog was loose again and now at my gate snarling away I did phone the police and asked them to sort it as if I did there would be no happy ending they fully understood and in 30 minutes they went to the owners house.

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2 minutes ago, B725 said:

So when faced with a mouthfull of cannie teeth what would you do? My Mrs while trying to get my Springer out of the way of a snarling German shepherd ended up scratched and her blouse ripped and my dog frightened by it. After the same dog was loose again and now at my gate snarling away I did phone the police and asked them to sort it as if I did there would be no happy ending they fully understood and in 30 minutes they went to the owners house.

Again like so much with dogs it depends but ultimately an aggressive dog that is going to bite will bite and there's obviously no issue in attempting to defend yourself from a dog that is trying to harm you, your loved ones or your dog. I'm in no way defending out of control or aggressive dogs, I'm simply annoyed that I have spent so much of my time and effort fixing dogs which have behavioural issues because of people like walked up, the dog he described in his post sounded like it was an untrained pet trying to say hello and because he didn't want to get dirty (which again I would be annoyed about to) he booted it in the stomach, its behaviour like that which can be the start of behavioural issues in dogs as I explained in an earlier post, walked up then has the cheek to moan about aggressive dogs, these are the type of dog that his behaviour can cause. 

26 minutes ago, WalkedUp said:

Exactly! What dog training advice??? That’s the whole point of this tedious debate.... this only exists inside your imagination. 

You are entitled to your unconventional opinions on dog-love,  but it is becoming very wearisome if you are unwilling to discuss what was said rather than what you have decided was said to meet your agenda. 

As evidenced above it is very easy (and very pointless) to do so. 

You can class them differently but whatever “label” you give to excuse aggressive behaviour, they will all get the same treatment if they jump up at strangers. 

Like I said earlier, you are so clueless about dog behaviour I simply can't have a discussion with you as you simply don't understand and take everything out of context. All I ask is you don't advise other people on here as someone who through no fault of their own might try what you tell them and ruin a dog. 

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2 minutes ago, WalkedUp said:

Listen, we are having a circular conversation. I’m happy with that but it must be getting boring for the rest of the PW community. I suggest we could use PMs instead?

I think it's more beneficial for people to understand what you got so wrong so know one else thinks what you did is a good idea. But your right it's going around in circles. 

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4 minutes ago, 12gauge82 said:

I think it's more beneficial for people to understand what you got so wrong so know one else thinks what you did is a good idea. But your right it's going around in circles. 


He booted someone else’s dog that was out of control and tried to jump all over time... 

 

I’m sorry but aside from saying how positive training methods are superior, you still have not said how you would have stopped someone else’s dog that you had never met before from jumping on you? 
 

Suggesting there are better ways to train a dog is all good when it’s your dog, but doesn’t do much when your meeting someone else’s untrained dog for the first time... 

 

Unless I am missing someone (for which I will apologise) I am missing what your response would have been? 🤔🤷‍♂️
 

I can only imagine that if you did nothing and let the dog jump all over you, having a word with the owner after the event about how they should train their dog (with whatever method they choose) would have resulted in them doing absolutely nothing. 
 

If they’re so stupid that they thing it’s acceptable to let their dog behave that way then they aren’t going to put in a considerable amount of effort to train it. 
 

There are plenty of people who are incapable of training a dog, but often they have enough brain cells to either put it on a lead or put it away when they have guests. 
 

 

 

I think Walkedup is getting a bit of a rough ride to be fair. As I said earlier, he clearly doesn’t go around randomly kicking peoples dogs. 
 

Let’s not get hysterical now. 

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