Jump to content

Here's my latest anomaly


Recommended Posts

OK and we move through of shooting careers we come across all sorts of puzzlers. . . .here is my latest and would love to hear your views. . . . A farmer I know always has a lot of feed in his yards and always complaining about the ferrals he has on his roofs. I go once a week and shoot anything between 5 and 15 but I never seem to make a difference to the flock of say 60 to 90 birds; how is this possible?

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Good shot? said:

Go twice a week and shoot 20 to 30 each time.ūüĎƬ† Should discourage some extra hangers on.

I'm happy to get out shooting each week especially lucky in lockdown but was just wondering where they come from as I know on driven shoots we get less birds as the season goes on as we can only kill them once

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just joking.

Shooting a few regularly doesn't discourage feral pigeon, unlike woodpigeon, removing or reducing their food source and shelter is the best way.

But maybe not practical in this instance.

Enjoy the sport.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Good shot? said:

Just joking.

Shooting a few regularly doesn't discourage feral pigeon, unlike woodpigeon, removing or reducing their food source and shelter is the best way.

But maybe not practical in this instance.

Enjoy the sport.

Think I'll keep the status quo on this one but I was just curious as to why they keep coming from. . . . maybe city dwellers relocating to the country life because of lockdown!

Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Shearwater said:

Think I'll keep the status quo on this one but I was just curious as to why they keep coming from. . . . maybe city dwellers relocating to the country life because of lockdown!

It's quite simple really,,,, you're not seeing the whole population in your area during your visits ūüėČ

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ferals are ridiculously persistent.  They learn how to keep just out of harm's way whilst still hanging around.

I used to shoot them around a very big grain store, until I gave it up as a bad job.  For the first few years they would perch on the gable end of the roof which is about 25 yards up at the apex.  They'd swirl around then set their wings to land and all you had to do was stand with your back to the building and pop them off as they came to land.  Then they got crafty.  They'd overfly the gable end and go sit on a tower a bit further in along the roof so you couldn't shoot at them from the ground.  If you let a shot off they'd get up and swirl round, you'd maybe get a shot or two and then they'd all be back safe again.

After that they moved their perching area to the gantries connecting the massive grain silos, which are even higher than the flat store roof and you just can't shoot there.

It's interesting.  Even though nobody really bothers trying to shoot at them any more their behaviour is now ingrained, and no doubt taught to the younger ones so it becomes the norm for the flock to do that.  Maybe in another 5 years they'll be venturing back into shooting range again?!

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Jim Neal said:

Ferals are ridiculously persistent.  They learn how to keep just out of harm's way whilst still hanging around.

I used to shoot them around a very big grain store, until I gave it up as a bad job.  For the first few years they would perch on the gable end of the roof which is about 25 yards up at the apex.  They'd swirl around then set their wings to land and all you had to do was stand with your back to the building and pop them off as they came to land.  Then they got crafty.  They'd overfly the gable end and go sit on a tower a bit further in along the roof so you couldn't shoot at them from the ground.  If you let a shot off they'd get up and swirl round, you'd maybe get a shot or two and then they'd all be back safe again.

After that they moved their perching area to the gantries connecting the massive grain silos, which are even higher than the flat store roof and you just can't shoot there.

It's interesting.  Even though nobody really bothers trying to shoot at them any more their behaviour is now ingrained, and no doubt taught to the younger ones so it becomes the norm for the flock to do that.  Maybe in another 5 years they'll be venturing back into shooting range again?!

I find them a sporting shot, I enjoy it as driven game is pretty predicable of where it comes from while the ferals are always jinking 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Shearwater said:

I find them a sporting shot, I enjoy it as driven game is pretty predicable of where it comes from while the ferals are always jinking 

Oh yes I completely agree that they're a challenging bird to shoot when they're on the wing and moving well.  It's just you can't shoot them from 80yds+ when they're sitting up on a tin roof!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/11/2020 at 22:02, Jim Neal said:

Ferals are ridiculously persistent.  They learn how to keep just out of harm's way whilst still hanging around.

I used to shoot them around a very big grain store, until I gave it up as a bad job.  For the first few years they would perch on the gable end of the roof which is about 25 yards up at the apex.  They'd swirl around then set their wings to land and all you had to do was stand with your back to the building and pop them off as they came to land.  Then they got crafty.  They'd overfly the gable end and go sit on a tower a bit further in along the roof so you couldn't shoot at them from the ground.  If you let a shot off they'd get up and swirl round, you'd maybe get a shot or two and then they'd all be back safe again.

After that they moved their perching area to the gantries connecting the massive grain silos, which are even higher than the flat store roof and you just can't shoot there.

It's interesting.  Even though nobody really bothers trying to shoot at them any more their behaviour is now ingrained, and no doubt taught to the younger ones so it becomes the norm for the flock to do that.  Maybe in another 5 years they'll be venturing back into shooting range again?!

Maybe this "learning" behaviour is akin to woodies and whirlies.

Sorry that the shoots have been knocked on the head for the time being

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Jim Neal said:

Oh yes I completely agree that they're a challenging bird to shoot when they're on the wing and moving well.  It's just you can't shoot them from 80yds+ when they're sitting up on a tin roof!

Aaaaaaaaaaah you need a rifle for that job mate and be careful as those roofs are expensive to repair

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Balotelli said:

Maybe this "learning" behaviour is akin to woodies and whirlies.

Sorry that the shoots have been knocked on the head for the time being

I wouldn't doubt it although I don't think anyone could scientifically prove it! 

Missing our two November dates is really cutting me up tbh but on a positive note I've started to catch up with a few "housekeeping" jobs on the bit I keeper such as clearing out shrubs/trees and strimming to improve the drives a bit.  You can't do that stuff usually mid-season s it's a bit too much disturbance for the birds.  Still. I'd rather have a 12 bore in my hand than a chainsaw but there you go, it is what it is....

3 hours ago, Shearwater said:

Aaaaaaaaaaah you need a rifle for that job mate and be careful as those roofs are expensive to repair

That's why I gave it up as a bad job! We sometimes knock a few of them down on the walkabout days we have with the syndicate, as it's right next door to a couple of other drives we shoot.  Cart/kill ratio is a little expensive when you've only got game shells in your pocket though!

Edited by Jim Neal
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

hi mate,  been shooting ferals myself recently due to woodies not leaving the trees.                                                                                                                                                           most are not shot.    if so they will at least double in numbers every year, great sport around farm buildings.                                                                                                                   tend to find 2nd time you shoot they get more wise to you.  have a look next time you are in the town/s                                                                                                                         if its like where i live you will see hundreds on the rooftops and flying about.  these birds are never shot                                                                                                                          so increase in numbers over the years.             

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

√ó
√ó
  • Create New...