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Engine wear quantification


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To cut a long story short adding 3cc to my v5 will get me a higher milage rate at work to the tune of about £500 a year. I don't want to change the car as its pretty frugal on fuel and parts plus has done all its depreciating already.

At 110,000 miles I suspect it has already worn an extra 3cc by itself, and an old friend who is a qualified engineer is happy to write a letter supporting the case if I can help find some published evidence to back the argument up that the expected wear by this point would be at least 3cc.

So far all I can find is that engine performance doesn't suffer until at least 0.2% increase in bore diameter, and we only need 0.1% to gain the 3cc. It does use a little oil but frankly not enough to argue it has started burning oil.

 

Has anyone got any inclination of where they might have read something that could help?

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If there is any data to be found on accepted rates of cylinder liner wear per hour of use or mileage that would probably suffice. 

Or even something suggesting most petrol engines would start seeing wear beyond standard tolerance by a certain mileage. 

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Even if you could prove the cc had increased by way of wear, I can't see any company accepting it and paying a higher rate of mileage allowance. They will work on the manufacturers original spec.

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18 hours ago, Gordon R said:

Even if you could prove the cc had increased by way of wear, I can't see any company accepting it and paying a higher rate of mileage allowance. They will work on the manufacturers original spec.

Agreed. Worth a try. 

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11 hours ago, London Best said:

Never heard such a ridiculous idea in a lifetime of motoring. Grow up!

Can’t really disagree with that. Even a rebore is not deemed to increase capacity for insurance purposes. 
 

if you have time on your hands, look up the maximum bore wear (before rebore/replacement) and calculate the swept volume from that. As far as I know, no manufacturer specifies wear as a percentage. Or you could get on with life.

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6 hours ago, SpringDon said:

if you have time on your hands, look up the maximum bore wear (before rebore/replacement) and calculate the swept volume from that. As far as I know, no manufacturer specifies wear as a percentage. Or you could get on with life.

Oh even better forget the idea completely!

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