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Even more ****** with dogs


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I doubt they would be prosecuted unless it can be shown there have been previous attacks.

A first instance with no serious injury, I think you’d just get a warning, a note on file so if it happened again they’d remove the dog I believe. Maybe they’d be told to muzzle it when out.

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One of the dog walkers I chat to over the manor where I walk the barker, carries a Jiff lemon squeezy with him, any dog that comes over to his whatever dog he has, scruffy looking thing resembling a drowned rat its called Frank, he just gives the offending dog a blast across the eyes. Apparently the dog is none too keen on this and runs off, works every time he says, unlike a baseball bat the plod can't nick you for it. Dealing with the dogs peed off owner, same story straight in the eyes.

I think its defiantly something worth thinking about.

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5 hours ago, 12gauge82 said:

The best way to deal with an aggressive dog that has made a bite is to attempt a couple of swift boots to break contact, although in truly aggressive large dogs this is very unlikely to work, in which case, if they have a sturdy collar on, take hold of it and twist until their air supply is cut off, the dog still might not let go but obviously will once it passes out, unfortunately a very large, driven and truly aggressive dog vs a smaller person isn't likely to end well no matter what you do. 

@B725 Really sorry to hear about your daughter. I hope she recovers quickly with no last effects

@12gauge82 I'm sorry but I have to very strongly disagree with you.

Over the years I've been witness to and on the receiving end of dog fights, bites & attacks and I can tell you that what you describe probably wont work and in fact it runs a very high chance of resulting in you getting badly bitten.

When a driven dog fights it looses all perspective of every thing except its taget. If its owner were to grab it by the collar he or she would likely be bitten, I've seen it happen first hand. It's even more likely to happen if a stranger were to try it.

The safest way is to grab the attacking dog by both its back legs and drag it backwards away from its victim. You'll be safe & it will be incapacitated until you're ready to release it by which time hopefully its owner will have reattached its lead. You could also try using your lead as a noose around it's back legs that way you could, if circumstances permit, tie the offender off to some thing but I have to say I've never tried this

There's no excuse for this sort of behaviour, its the handlers fault and it should be hammered hard. Owners / handler have a responsibility to manage their animals so that they are allowed become a nuisance. And to have a dog bite some one & then FO is a seriously low thing to do and should be severely punished.

It's not just about the bite and the immediate physical trauma, the after effects can include the lasting effects of crush injuries, nerve damage & a psychological element which shouldn't be underestimated. The same things also apply to victimised dogs.

If you're dog's being attacked you'll do whatever you have to have to protect it but in doing so you run a strong risk of becoming the target. If you get a kick in on a dog, depending on its temperament there's chance it'll come for you and I've seen this happen.  I don't have a problem with that scenario and I always go equipped for it with a stout walking stick. And the reverse of that is that I aways carry a muzzle.

My last encounter was against six uncontrolled dogs who attacked, while my two were incapacitated. I defended flank & rear ends with my walking stick. We beat five off quickly and the last one who had managed a the throat hold bailed when my other dog and I unleashed hell upon it. I was unscathed but my dogs suffered lots minor wounds.

My dogs are very tough and robust and suffered no lasting effects but for a while they were preemptively aggressive toward unknown dogs. As such It was my responsibility to manage them appropriately whilst they were in public until such time that their heads reset. Depending on circumstances they were kept on long lines, short leads and when appropriate they were preemptively muzzled. Lesser dogs would likely become neurotic after such an event, possibly never getting over it

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1 hour ago, Ooops said:

@B725 Really sorry to hear about your daughter. I hope she recovers quickly with no last effects

@12gauge82 I'm sorry but I have to very strongly disagree with you.

Over the years I've been witness to and on the receiving end of dog fights, bites & attacks and I can tell you that what you describe probably wont work and in fact it runs a very high chance of resulting in you getting badly bitten.

When a driven dog fights it looses all perspective of every thing except its taget. If its owner were to grab it by the collar he or she would likely be bitten, I've seen it happen first hand. It's even more likely to happen if a stranger were to try it.

The safest way is to grab the attacking dog by both its back legs and drag it backwards away from its victim. You'll be safe & it will be incapacitated until you're ready to release it by which time hopefully its owner will have reattached its lead. You could also try using your lead as a noose around it's back legs that way you could, if circumstances permit, tie the offender off to some thing but I have to say I've never tried this

There's no excuse for this sort of behaviour, its the handlers fault and it should be hammered hard. Owners / handler have a responsibility to manage their animals so that they are allowed become a nuisance. And to have a dog bite some one & then FO is a seriously low thing to do and should be severely punished.

It's not just about the bite and the immediate physical trauma, the after effects can include the lasting effects of crush injuries, nerve damage & a psychological element which shouldn't be underestimated. The same things also apply to victimised dogs.

If you're dog's being attacked you'll do whatever you have to have to protect it but in doing so you run a strong risk of becoming the target. If you get a kick in on a dog, depending on its temperament there's chance it'll come for you and I've seen this happen.  I don't have a problem with that scenario and I always go equipped for it with a stout walking stick. And the reverse of that is that I aways carry a muzzle.

My last encounter was against six uncontrolled dogs who attacked, while my two were incapacitated. I defended flank & rear ends with my walking stick. We beat five off quickly and the last one who had managed a the throat hold bailed when my other dog and I unleashed hell upon it. I was unscathed but my dogs suffered lots minor wounds.

My dogs are very tough and robust and suffered no lasting effects but for a while they were preemptively aggressive toward unknown dogs. As such It was my responsibility to manage them appropriately whilst they were in public until such time that their heads reset. Depending on circumstances they were kept on long lines, short leads and when appropriate they were preemptively muzzled. Lesser dogs would likely become neurotic after such an event, possibly never getting over it

I think you misunderstood my post, that is for dog that has already bitten and won't let go, I can assure you, I have dealt with dogs that you could drag them by the back legs all day long and they still wouldn't come off, your right, your very likely to be bitten choking a dog off, but short of killing it with a weapon, it's one of the most reliable ways to get a dog off. Like I said in my earlier post, a determined and big enough dog vs a smaller person and it'd be a very bad outcome no matter what they did. 

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2 hours ago, 12gauge82 said:

I think you misunderstood my post, that is for dog that has already bitten and won't let go

I apologise I did partially misunderstand you. My reference was predominantly regarding dog on dog. Pulling the rear legs, (walking backwards dragging the dog until it lets go) is much lower risk and really effective. It does assume that one dog doesn't want to be there. If its two hard, driven dogs it'll need one person for each dog or one dog secured but again it really will work 

The technique you describe was once, many years back, used by military handlers and it definitely does work but I've only seen it prescribed with the lead already attached to the collar.

In one incident I was all out of options and I did as you describe, I got mangled. No serious punctures but three weeks before I could use my wrist properly and I only managed to slow the dog up, I never got a good enough grip to stop him

2 hours ago, 12gauge82 said:

I can assure you, I have dealt with dogs that you could drag them by the back legs all day long and they still wouldn't come off

I'm sure you're right, no question about it, particularly so with certain breeds but for many it will work. 

2 hours ago, 12gauge82 said:

Like I said in my earlier post, a determined and big enough dog vs a smaller person and it'd be a very bad outcome no matter what they did. 

I absolutely agree with you and would add the average fit, healthy 5'11" unarmed guy would not do well in that situation

Again 12gauge, I apologise for any misunderstanding on my part

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3 hours ago, B725 said:

It turns out that the two Dalmatians both had hold of a Labrador yesterday we are now trying to track the labs owner to see if they will report it.

 

Owners are nothing but scum. 

Know the dogs are like that and take them out and let them do it again anyway. 

 

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30 minutes ago, Ooops said:

I apologise I did partially misunderstand you. My reference was predominantly regarding dog on dog. Pulling the rear legs, (walking backwards dragging the dog until it lets go) is much lower risk and really effective. It does assume that one dog doesn't want to be there. If its two hard, driven dogs it'll need one person for each dog or one dog secured but again it really will work 

The technique you describe was once, many years back, used by military handlers and it definitely does work but I've only seen it prescribed with the lead already attached to the collar.

In one incident I was all out of options and I did as you describe, I got mangled. No serious punctures but three weeks before I could use my wrist properly and I only managed to slow the dog up, I never got a good enough grip to stop him

I'm sure you're right, no question about it, particularly so with certain breeds but for many it will work. 

I absolutely agree with you and would add the average fit, healthy 5'11" unarmed guy would not do well in that situation

Again 12gauge, I apologise for any misunderstanding on my part

No apologie required and the advice you gave is also sound. 

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53 minutes ago, bruno22rf said:

Another trip to the vet today after a local Police Officer allowed his (pet) Alsation to attack my dog as he was looking for a ball - now infected and his temp is over 40. Bill now stands at £171 and rising.

bite.jpg

That doesn't look good but the vet should sort it,it makes you mad that some one has allowed their dog to do that because they are a a_hole and should never be allowed to own a dog.hopefully you can get the idiot to pay all your bills.

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1 hour ago, bruno22rf said:

Another trip to the vet today after a local Police Officer allowed his (pet) Alsation to attack my dog as he was looking for a ball - now infected and his temp is over 40. Bill now stands at £171 and rising.

was this from last week's attack or a fresh one?

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10 hours ago, Mickeydredd said:

was this from last week's attack or a fresh one?

Last weeks attack - first visit to the vet was Friday where he was given pain killers but he was not happy over the weekend so we took him back today - wound has become infected so injections and a clean with antibiotics to follow.

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23 minutes ago, WalkedUp said:

Madness, the other owner should pay if they are liable for the injury. 

I quite agree but half the problem is that they refuse to believe that their dog is not playing and is aggressive towards other dogs and people. 

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12 hours ago, captainhastings said:

My dog is not good with other dogs at all so all ways on a lead. Trouble is it works both ways when people with safe dogs let them run all over the shop and do what they want. All dogs should be tight at heel on or off leads unless working or in none public place 


I believe the requirement is to be under control. 
 

My dog doesn’t need to be stood tight at heel, but he does need to come back to me the moment he is told. 
 

If you have your dog on a lead and another dog runs up to it and the other dog gets nailed, that’s the other dog owners fault. Their dog wasn’t under control. Your dog being on a lead is under control. 
 

If they were able to recall their dog then it wouldn’t be running up to you and there wouldn’t be a problem. 

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24 minutes ago, Lloyd90 said:


I believe the requirement is to be under control. 
 

My dog doesn’t need to be stood tight at heel, but he does need to come back to me the moment he is told. 
 

If you have your dog on a lead and another dog runs up to it and the other dog gets nailed, that’s the other dog owners fault. Their dog wasn’t under control. Your dog being on a lead is under control. 
 

If they were able to recall their dog then it wouldn’t be running up to you and there wouldn’t be a problem. 

 

Yes exactly. My dog was basically ruined by dogs running up and having a pop. He didn't a vicious bone in his body and ran off and hid behind a tree from a pug lol. But then he matured and now would put the boot in first and his 30kg of muscle. My fault really for not keeping other dogs back. I won't make that mistake again if i ever have another dog

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36 minutes ago, Lloyd90 said:

Don't take my dog many places that other people walk their dogs. 
 

Staying away from other dog owners massively reduces the problems.  

Thats what I try to do but there is no end of idiots now with dogs since lockdown it gets harder unless we go out in the car, the trouble is because their dog brings back a ball it's a trained dog they truly have no idea.

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Honestly, dog licensing (although probably too difficult to police / implement) would be my suggestion. 
 

along the canal through my village I’ve now met the same stupid woman 3 times. Every time one of her designer mongrels has tried to bite my aging border terrier even tho she has it on a lead she still lets it pull as we pass. My dog is well trained and doesn’t react - yesterday I told her I’d had enough, it it happens again I will let my terrier react and her dog (despite being quite a lot bigger) will regret it. She seemed offended by this and that her dog wasn’t doing anything wrong!

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I lost it so badly with one barmy woman with four dogs out of control, two of them greyhounds, that when I set about them with a stick she called the police. 
Policeman told her to keep her dogs under control. Not seen them off the lead since but they still go stupid every time anyone goes near her and she makes no attempt to even quieten them.

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