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Birding Year List


chrisjpainter
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3 hours ago, JDog said:

A White tailed Lapwing near here yesterday. 

Someone was very observant and need to be congratulated in spotting a White Tailed Lapwing , I , like many others wouldn't know the difference from what we call a Peewit , Green Plover or more commonly known as a Lapwing from a White Tail one , in fact I never knew they existed , until now of course :good:

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Local farm/ conservation/ shoot started the year by managing to catch  and ring the first little egret for the farm. Total of birds they rung for 2021 3,500 +. Total rung since 2006 now 40,000 +. Not bad for 200 acres managed well, the right habitat and folk willing to share knowledge, fieldcraft and skills. 2021 another good year locally for turtle doves despite pressure/disturbance from birders . . . . Seen ring tail hen harrier on local heath last few weeks. Found it's roost and several pellets. Shame birders had to report, post pics and location of it on their sites. Some are strange narrow minded obsessive lot. Glad i kept local of roost to myself. And they dare call us the bad guys! . . . . . . . Short eared owl and snow buntings at Benacre beach yesterday. Gt northern divers off coast and female merlin after starlings going to roost in reed bed. . . . . Saw a house martin  Newmarket way in late November. Found out other day one seen in near by Fordham the day before is latest recorded for Cambridgeshire. Same bird? Maybe. Folks have reported seeing swallows.   NB   

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55 minutes ago, Walker570 said:

Now, that is something to be pleased about.  They have been decimated and in very short supply.

Handsom bird which twitchers probably consider 'common'.

Yes mate, I hadn't seen any since summer,  or the Goldfinches. 

Still seems odd how they sit on the feeder stuffing themselves whilst the tits & robins grab a seed and dive into cover.

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56 minutes ago, Mice! said:

Yes mate, I hadn't seen any since summer,  or the Goldfinches. 

Still seems odd how they sit on the feeder stuffing themselves whilst the tits & robins grab a seed and dive into cover.

Yeah the difference is they have different beak arrangements, the finches are Granivorous and can crush seeds and swallow them straight away, with their heavy mandibles, whereas the Robins and tits are insectivorous, with daintier bills, they take the seed away and hold it in their feet while breaking it down into smaller segments, with hammer movements of the beak.

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45 minutes ago, twenty said:

Yeah the difference is they have different beak arrangements, the finches are Granivorous and can crush seeds and swallow them straight away, with their heavy mandibles, whereas the Robins and tits are insectivorous, with daintier bills, they take the seed away and hold it in their feet while breaking it down into smaller segments, with hammer movements of the beak.

I hadn't thought about the difference in there beaks, the Greenfinch certainly looks heavy duty, I've always thought of the tits as being nervous and wanted to feed in cover, cheers.

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Two Whooper Swans, and six Bewick Swans, at Wainlode Hill meadows,( nr Tewkesbury ), yesterday.

Female Siskin on sunflower feeder in our garden, first I've seen for a year or two.

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5 minutes ago, henry d said:

Parakeets, two dozen of the noisy **** in a park in Tyneside, never seen or heard one before here!

Both Monk Parakeets and Ring-necked parakeets are now on the general licence, they are both classed as agricultural pests, with the monk parakeet also posing a threat to power lines, by using supporting poles and lines for communal nesting, whereas ring necks use all available tree nesting holes to the detriment of the native species,.......they now form large flocks in London and the south east, with numbers in the thousands, and are an introduced species, with escapees from aviaries/collections etc forming initial numbers.

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One for the wildfowlers , or should I say 101  .

101 Whitefronted Geese on Buckingham marshes in Norfolk yesterday and 5 Taiga Bean geese , well worth a visit if you are in the area , mind you , this is for looking only as there is No Shooting allowed.

On Sunday the 9th of January the numbers of Whitefronts on the Buckenham marshes were counted at 199 .

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