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1 hour ago, Lloyd90 said:

Sadly not everyone can get a nice job on an estate that provides a nice life style. 
 

So many people out there just working jobs they hate because they enjoy the £££, or the opportunities the £££ presents. 
 

My best mates sister dislikes her job, but making £150-200k a year in London working on big contracts gives her opportunities she simply won’t get anywhere else. 

I understand what you are saying Lloyd , several people around here left fairly standard jobs to work on the oil rigs that paid top money , there intension was  to earn enough money and then live the life they wanted to live , as the money rolled in they then started to raise there standard of living , moving into a bigger house which meant a bigger mortgage , changing the car into something much bigger and instead one holiday they would have two or more , then the bubble burst and they were in a muddle with not been able to cope with the lower income .

As I said , I took on the job which suited my lifestyle but the income was only half what I was previously been paid , if I found I didn't like the job , or they didn't like me I could have gone back on site with not much difference with my pay slips , as it turned out it was a good decision .

For most people there come a time in life where one door shut and another one will open , weather that person go through that open door is a chance they might have to take , for some it will be for the better and for others it won't , but life is all about taking chances , I settled for a fair wage working in a nice environment , contented yes , but I certainly won't be one of the richest men in our local grave yard . 

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2 hours ago, marsh man said:

I understand what you are saying Lloyd , several people around here left fairly standard jobs to work on the oil rigs that paid top money , there intension was  to earn enough money and then live the life they wanted to live , as the money rolled in they then started to raise there standard of living , moving into a bigger house which meant a bigger mortgage , changing the car into something much bigger and instead one holiday they would have two or more , then the bubble burst and they were in a muddle with not been able to cope with the lower income .

As I said , I took on the job which suited my lifestyle but the income was only half what I was previously been paid , if I found I didn't like the job , or they didn't like me I could have gone back on site with not much difference with my pay slips , as it turned out it was a good decision .

For most people there come a time in life where one door shut and another one will open , weather that person go through that open door is a chance they might have to take , for some it will be for the better and for others it won't , but life is all about taking chances , I settled for a fair wage working in a nice environment , contented yes , but I certainly won't be one of the richest men in our local grave yard . 

 

You will be rich with experience mate :) I'm only 30, hoping I got a few more years of hard work before I ease up and can enjoy myself lol! 

Got a fairly chunky mortgage but as things stand my partner and I will have that paid off well before we are 40. 

 

In future I can knock my current job to part time if needed, take 50% pay but it's still a decent salary (because it is evenings, weekends and nights) but part time you are hardly ever in. That's the long term goal for the time being :) 

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Work like you're going to live forever, and play like you're going to die tomorrow .....

A phrase I stole from a buddy dying from cancer.

I don't think many folks lie on their death beds wishing they'd worked harder though !

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6 minutes ago, Smokersmith said:

Work like you're going to live forever, and play like you're going to die tomorrow .....

A phrase I stole from a buddy dying from cancer.

I don't think many folks lie on their death beds wishing they'd worked harder though !

Absolutely no one has ever said they wished that they had worked harder. Most people like the Hull poet Philip Larkin wished they had had more sex.

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12 minutes ago, JDog said:

Absolutely no one has ever said they wished that they had worked harder. Most people like the Hull poet Philip Larkin wished they had had more sex.

Better to burn out ...than fade away................

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21 hours ago, London Best said:

Life is not a rehearsal. We are only going round once. I packed up working full time at 53 mostly so I could go picking up or loading between 3 to 6 days / week, quite apart from my own shooting / stalking. Yes, I would have been richer had I continued to work but I had 12 years with , to me, a wonderful lifestyle.

12 years ago I had 2 jobs and was raking in over 120k, then it all went down the toilet. Everything I had been breaking my back for was “given” to the now Ex.  I ended up potless owing 40k in solicitors bills trying to keep my kids (in vain). Back to 2 jobs to dig myself out of debt then more tragedies ensued. Your post is absolutely spot on, life is  not a rehearsal and needs to be gripped and cherished, but people who have not experienced tragedy will quote the phrase, but not follow it. I’m retiring in 18 months ( the day before my 50th ) and will have paid off my modest mortgage. I intend to do as little as possible, spend as much time with the kids and go shooting with my pal as often as I can.

Always makes me smile when thinking about the lengthy study in Norway to find what really makes people happy, the results were conclusively, low expectations.

 

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4 hours ago, marsh man said:

I understand what you are saying Lloyd , several people around here left fairly standard jobs to work on the oil rigs that paid top money , there intension was  to earn enough money and then live the life they wanted to live , as the money rolled in they then started to raise there standard of living , moving into a bigger house which meant a bigger mortgage , changing the car into something much bigger and instead one holiday they would have two or more , then the bubble burst and they were in a muddle with not been able to cope with the lower income .

As I said , I took on the job which suited my lifestyle but the income was only half what I was previously been paid , if I found I didn't like the job , or they didn't like me I could have gone back on site with not much difference with my pay slips , as it turned out it was a good decision .

For most people there come a time in life where one door shut and another one will open , weather that person go through that open door is a chance they might have to take , for some it will be for the better and for others it won't , but life is all about taking chances , I settled for a fair wage working in a nice environment , contented yes , but I certainly won't be one of the richest men in our local grave yard . 

I wasn’t going to mention my cousin as there’s enough doom and gloom doing the rounds at the moment, and he had a grand life anyhow, it just ended much too soon. 
He went into the RN straight from school, married his childhood sweetheart, and then settled in Aberdeen to raise a family. He worked long stints on the rigs and during his long stints at home developed his own Bonsai tree business, and cared for them to the extent he wouldn’t sell them to people he had doubts would care for them properly! 😀

With a mortgage long paid off, he took early retirement with an excellent pension but within two years this full of life bloke developed a brain tumour and died in his mid sixties. 
To balance it all out I know of many folk for whom it has worked; several whom have retired at 50 odd on a good pension and are now leading carefree lives doing what they want when they want. 
I worked long shifts for 12 years, and although the pay was good, it wasn’t until the place closed I realised just how much time I actually spent working....12 hours at work, 8 sleeping if I was lucky, and another 4 just waiting to go to work. 🤷‍♂️It’s not exactly living. 

Quality of life and standard of living aren’t one and the same. 

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It is said that money cannot buy happiness, it only helps by making you miserable in comfort.  
I never earned any big wages, far from it, certainly not 1/5 of the sort of money Taileron was talking about. But I didn’t waste money on unnecessary stuff and invested what I could afford. I did well (was lucky) with my modest investments and consequently my savings have enabled me to spend the last twenty years doing pretty much what I want.

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10 minutes ago, Scully said:

I wasn’t going to mention my cousin as there’s enough doom and gloom doing the rounds at the moment, and he had a grand life anyhow, it just ended much too soon. 
He went into the RN straight from school, married his childhood sweetheart, and then settled in Aberdeen to raise a family. He worked long stints on the rigs and during his long stints at home developed his own Bonsai tree business, and cared for them to the extent he wouldn’t sell them to people he had doubts would care for them properly! 😀

With a mortgage long paid off, he took early retirement with an excellent pension but within two years this full of life bloke developed a brain tumour and died in his mid sixties. 
To balance it all out I know of many folk for whom it has worked; several whom have retired at 50 odd on a good pension and are now leading carefree lives doing what they want when they want. 
I worked long shifts for 12 years, and although the pay was good, it wasn’t until the place closed I realised just how much time I actually spent working....12 hours at work, 8 sleeping if I was lucky, and another 4 just waiting to go to work. 🤷‍♂️It’s not exactly living. 

Quality of life and standard of living aren’t one and the same. 

Sorry to hear about your cousin Scully , life can be very unfair at times and what we are going through now is a perfect example with many people passing away well before there time .

We were brought up with the knowledge that whatever you wanted in life you had to work for it and like many others at my age I left school at 15 , as my birthday was in November I left school at Christmas and started with a building firm the day after Boxing day , once I could lay a few bricks I soon took on little jobs to earn a bit extra , I was then coming up to the age where as far as fitness go I was getting near my peak and could easily work all day and at times well into the night , as I said previously I took on the extra work to pay the mortgage off and looking back , paying off the mortgage off was the best days work I done .

This gave you peace of mind that you had a roof over your head and as far as work went you could take chances and wasn't over concerned as to weather it would be the right choice of jobs you took on .

Then you come to a time when your body start to tell you to ease up a bit as the hard work and long hours are beginning to take it's toll , by now if you have looked after the pennies there shouldn't be any need to do all the extra work and should be able to manage on a flat week , like the old saying , look after the pennies and the pounds will look after themselves .  

 

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15 minutes ago, islandgun said:

Cash poor so still enjoying the challenge 😄...I remember a saying " I was born with nothing and still have most of it"..

Very similar really , born with nothing and still have next to it , no I can't complain , like many others I have had to work hard for what I have ended with , my own small bungalow , everything in it is paid for and don't owe nobody any money .

We had very little when we were young and my father also said don't buy what you can't afford and throughout my life we have only bought what we could afford and had the money at the time to pay for it .

Taking a mortgage on was the only time we owed money , I intended to pay it off as soon as possible and by not having holidays and doing extra work I think I done well in paying it off in exactly half the time I took it on which was 20 years and paid it off in 10 , the best days work I ever done was the day when it was finally paid off and the house I had then was mine .

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1 hour ago, marsh man said:

Very similar really , born with nothing and still have next to it , no I can't complain , like many others I have had to work hard for what I have ended with , my own small bungalow , everything in it is paid for and don't owe nobody any money .

We had very little when we were young and my father also said don't buy what you can't afford and throughout my life we have only bought what we could afford and had the money at the time to pay for it .

Taking a mortgage on was the only time we owed money , I intended to pay it off as soon as possible and by not having holidays and doing extra work I think I done well in paying it off in exactly half the time I took it on which was 20 years and paid it off in 10 , the best days work I ever done was the day when it was finally paid off and the house I had then was mine .

I think we had a similar childhood but there was only six of us.😏 TBH I retired young and spent most of my young life gallivanting round the world working on farms and boats it was later in life that I had some education and then a family and all the responsibilities that go with that. I was able to build my own house, brick by brick and now my kids are all but gone, having reached the grand old age of 68 Im wondering whether to get a larger boat or start a seaweed farm or draw the pension and make willow birdfeeders in my shed..😀

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1 hour ago, islandgun said:

I think we had a similar childhood but there was only six of us.😏 TBH I retired young and spent most of my young life gallivanting round the world working on farms and boats it was later in life that I had some education and then a family and all the responsibilities that go with that. I was able to build my own house, brick by brick and now my kids are all but gone, having reached the grand old age of 68 Im wondering whether to get a larger boat or start a seaweed farm or draw the pension and make willow birdfeeders in my shed..😀

Sounds idyllic. 

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1 hour ago, islandgun said:

I think we had a similar childhood but there was only six of us.😏 TBH I retired young and spent most of my young life gallivanting round the world working on farms and boats it was later in life that I had some education and then a family and all the responsibilities that go with that. I was able to build my own house, brick by brick and now my kids are all but gone, having reached the grand old age of 68 Im wondering whether to get a larger boat or start a seaweed farm or draw the pension and make willow birdfeeders in my shed..😀

Yes sounds marvellous, but why have you not started taking your pension yet?

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57 minutes ago, Scully said:

Sounds idyllic. 

 

40 minutes ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

Yes sounds marvellous, but why have you not started taking your pension yet?

Cheers both. I still have 3 student offspring that dip into any self employed income we can manage to find in these difficult times. no early retirement here but yes I consider myself very lucky and no,  Iv'e not claimed a pension as yet although my shed does look attractive.🙂

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