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Surrendering Two Parts Of A Side by Side Shotgun ?


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I have got a old Midland Gun Company s x s black powder hammer gun that I don't no longer want or use , if I handed it in to the police station would they let me keep the stock with the action still on to try and convert it into a lamp stand  and let them have the barrels and the fore stock .

I have sent them a email but have yet to hear from them and wandered if anyone had asked for something similar .

THANKS    MM

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I was always told that you cannot keep the pressure bearing parts as Scully says. I ended up just keeping a fore end as a paper weight on a barn find. Seems a waste of an old gun that can be used with bp, assuming it is in proof and sound enough to shoot. I shoot bp hammer guns, percussion and breach loaders, and they are great fun to use.

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3 minutes ago, Scully said:

I seriously doubt it without it being deactivated. Pressure bearing parts and all that. 

THANKS , when the gun is deactivated , do they only deactivate the barrels ? , or make all parts un useable ,  the gun itself is close on 100 years old .

PS  ... MANY THANKS for all the above advice 

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1 minute ago, marsh man said:

THANKS , when the gun is deactivated , do they only deactivate the barrels ? , or make all parts un useable ,  the gun itself is close on 100 years old .

PS  ... MANY THANKS for all the above advice 

Deactivation has gone through quite a few revisions over the years, becoming more intrusive with each revision. 
In my experience the barrels will be sliced lengthwise under the fore end ( at the least ) and any working parts in the action will no longer be working.
I’ve no idea to what extent the butchering is carried out, but could you not keep the entire gun as an antique, off ticket? I don’t know the cut off dates for such, nor the criteria, but if it isn’t nitro proofed, it may be worth finding out? 

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9 minutes ago, Scully said:

Deactivation has gone through quite a few revisions over the years, becoming more intrusive with each revision. 
In my experience the barrels will be sliced lengthwise under the fore end ( at the least ) and any working parts in the action will no longer be working.
I’ve no idea to what extent the butchering is carried out, but could you not keep the entire gun as an antique, off ticket? I don’t know the cut off dates for such, nor the criteria, but if it isn’t nitro proofed, it may be worth finding out? 

THANKS again for your wealth of information , I don't think it is nitro proofed but I am only going by the markings on the breech block , I have got two and the other one ( T Wild ) do state nitro proof which I am keeping , when things get to anywhere near normal I will get it checked out , another what might sound like a silly question , could you get only the stock and action deactivated if need be if the rest have been handed in ?

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5 minutes ago, marsh man said:

THANKS again for your wealth of information , I don't think it is nitro proofed but I am only going by the markings on the breech block , I have got two and the other one ( T Wild ) do state nitro proof which I am keeping , when things get to anywhere near normal I will get it checked out , another what might sound like a silly question , could you get only the stock and action deactivated if need be if the rest have been handed in ?

I can’t see why not.
If you could keep it off ticket it would make a fabulous wall hanger. 

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If the gun is old enough to be classed as an antique no need to have it on your licence if you are not going to shoot it

 

Whoops got that one wrong. I think that applies to muzzle loaders only

Edited by DUNKS
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If you do decide to keep as a wall hanger, be safe and remove the hammers from inside and store them elsewhere.

Maybe no legal requirements but if it ever got stolen at least it couldn't be used.

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The cost of de-activation is now a lot of money. On a SBS the barrels must be slotted and have steel plugs welded in the chambers. The action must have the breech face(s) drilled so that it can no longer support a cartridge. The trigger linkage between the triggers and whatever they "trip" to fire the gun must be destroyed and the (I think) the triggers then welded into the trigger plate. Finally the fore-end iron must be welded to the front loop of the barrel so that the gun can no longer be broken down into its three elements of barrel, fore-end and stock and action. Having done ALL that the gun then has to be submitted to either Proof House for a de-activation certificate that costs now £XX. As the OP is in Norfolk it'd be just cheaper to consign it to Holt's or similar as it is and let it go for auction.

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Thanks for the excellent advice and suggestions , very much appreciated . once I hear the requirements needed from the police I will report back to anyone interested before it go in the melting pot , or like the above member mentioned , the auction.

All the best and STAY SAFE

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