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2 minutes ago, TRINITY said:

If we are discussing the merits of strength in this type of stock, would carbon fibre be even stronger and perhaps lighter.

YES is the simple answer and guns are out there in carbin fibre and in my own opinion is the alternative to wood. But i will get shot down ?

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10 hours ago, sabel25 said:

No not a willy ****** contest. I like timber, Proper wood and a traditionalist and time served the old ways and done besoke joinery since leaving school. No one will ever sell me the idea of laminate stocks or battery cars that cost more to manufacture and more carbon footprint and toxins in the glues

Nothing wrong with any of that;  you seem to be taking this personally for some reason. It’s personal choice. 
I have no laminated stocked guns at all; I have a few synthetic ones but the vast majority are wood.....the highest grade of which cracked, incidentally. 
The OP asked for opinions and mine is based on experience; yours seems to be based on a perceived insult to your skills for some reason. Don’t forget, your OSB ply sheathing is full of toxic glues also. 
Timber is great, and there will always be a place for it, but laminates are timber too, and while we’re on the subject, synthetics have their place too. 
Laminates may not be as attractive as wood, but you can’t knock its integrity, you simply can’t. 

10 hours ago, TRINITY said:

If we are discussing the merits of strength in this type of stock, would carbon fibre be even stronger and perhaps lighter.

Indeed. I think Remington and Benelli have both made carbon fibre stocked autos. Expensive stuff. 🙂

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All very interesting, but whether it be carbon fibre, walnut or plywood it is just done to catch the eye of the shooter.

 

All 3 variants would be adequate, but two of them are unnecessary!

 

You pays your money and takes your choice!

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Just now, Scully said:

Of course it is. The basic design was perfected over a hundred years ago, everything else is simply marketing. 

Why then do so many people not see this element?

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3 hours ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

Why then do so many people not see this element?

Well if they did the gun making industry would be in serious trouble. 

A mate of mine who is a very good shot and has been at it years tells me he has had plenty of guns and followed the trends. After all that time he has developed a 3 point simple policy that he now sticks to

Age is irrelevant, condition is what matters

Never pays over £1000 and usually gets for half that

It must be a miroku

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8 hours ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

Why then do so many people not see this element?

Well speaking for myself, it’s because I’m a gun nut, and as we’re only here the once I consider life too short to try all the ones I want to. 
I’m with that mate of Trinity’s above, apart from the Miroku bit. 
If money were no object, I’d probably only have a couple of newish type guns, most of my firearms expenditure would be spent on classic, vintage and antique firearms; there aren’t many modern ones which float my boat at all to be honest. 
The same applied when I owned handguns. 

Marketing, and especially the marketing of gimmicks which it is claimed will make us the shot we want to be, is the industry’s only way of parting us from our money, for a mechanism which as I said, was basically perfected over a hundred years ago. 
The only thing which changes really, is the materials from which some guns are made, but in essence no one armed with a sxs or OU made last month, will have any sort of advantage over someone armed with an identical gun made 100 years ago. 
The same cannot be said of golf clubs or tennis rackets, or motor vehicles. It’s a funny old game. 🙂
 

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Agree Scully, miroku is not everyone's taste but they are a good example of an old well made reliable gun and there are still plenty of fine examples around for less than £1000.

I  had a few years shooting in late 70's early 80's then packed it in till a couple of years ago. New guns look no better to me than they did back then. However I have noticed three changes.

1. Multi chokes were rare back then and still being perfected. I would say they are an improvement

2. The high raised adjustable rib is another thing I noticed, that was not around then ... jury out for me on that.

3. The adjustable stock,  I dont remember those back then but there could have been a few around.. I would say possible improvement.

So if manufactures dont find genuine innovation or marketing gimmicks they will not sell new guns in commercially sustainable amounts

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