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Why my seven year old will not be taking £1 to school for Comic Relief tomorrow.


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2 hours ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

But according to Lloyd they are all needed and worth every penny!:cool1:


I don’t think I can put a price on what they are worth... I certainly couldn’t put a price on the wages of 1 CEO based on the fact some bloke has 3 charity shops in their town. 
 

I wouldn’t be able to tell you the worth of an airline CEO if he had 3 airplanes sat at 1 airport. 
 

I don’t really know what relevance that is. 
 

How much is the Manchester United manager worth? 
 

Im not sure they’re worth every Penny ... what I said was good luck finding someone on that level without paying that kind of money. 
 

Would you be less offended if the manager was on £150,000 instead of £200,000 ... or would we just have a thread complaining that £150k was too  much?! 🤷‍♂️
 

 

How much are CEO’s allowed to make before someone becomes offended? 
Someone will always complain as long as it’s more than they make. 
 

I bet if anyone on this forum was taken into the boss’ office on Monday and said a new position had come up and the pay was £150-200k they wouldn’t turn it down. 

 

 

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Charity begins with taxation. Too much money is wasted on ridiculous causes (I’m looking at you donkey sanctuaries) and commercial charity businesses (thousands of workers pestering gullible oldies for their last penny or fat cat CEOs, CFOs, COOs etc). 

The charity industry needs strong regulation. For example, before a charity can commence public fundraising it must have a review by an independent commission of the validity of the cause, the alignment to UK policy and an audit of accounts to ensure a minimum of e.g. 85% of revenue is spent on the stated cause. 

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6 hours ago, Lloyd90 said:


Why would an individual shop have a CEO? 

Hello, it's only 3 shops now so three managers and only 1 CEO now,(Lady) not sure if paid or Volunteer, but charities can get a lot of tax breaks, 

Edited by oldypigeonpopper
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13 hours ago, TRINITY said:

Was it Oxfam who,s staff were strong supporters of the local knocking shops out in Puerto rico

Yes. But they got it free. So it was still a charitable act

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6 hours ago, Lloyd90 said:



 

 

How much are CEO’s allowed to make before someone becomes offended? 
Someone will always complain as long as it’s more than they make. 
 

I bet if anyone on this forum was taken into the boss’ office on Monday and said a new position had come up and the pay was £150-200k they wouldn’t turn it down. 

 

 

And here lies the real reason for resentment. 🙂Personally I don’t care; I think it’s a worthy cause. 

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8 hours ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

I think you are entering in to the realm of fantasy with your final comment and as for football and its managers, they are all overpaid.


Not really. 
 

Im not anywhere near £100k a year myself, but a lot of the professionals that I’m working with are pushing £80/90k a year, and a lot of the Doctors that I do assessments alongside are pushing £120-150k + all sorts of enhancements on top of that. 
 

They only had to do 13+ years of specialist training and exams to get to where they are. 
 


 

I have a close friends sister who’s been working in London. Similarly she put herself through all sorts of courses and got the skills required, then went to London doing major project management earning £150-200k a year overseeing huge projects for big Corps. 
 

I doubt most would have the ability, skills etc to get the qualification, experience needed to get jobs on that level. 
 

 

The point is they are the people at the top. Surprise surprise people on top positions at big company’s are on high salaries. 
 

If you don’t want to give to charities then don’t but moaning about what a CEO earns as justification just seems a bit odd. 
 

 

Will you write to Tesco and tell them your going to shop elsewhere because you think they pay their CEO too much? 
 

In 2018 Tesco CEO was paid £4,900,000 😳 ... I bet even the charity bosses were moaning that he is paid too much!! 

 

 

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Most of instances you mention have metrics from which performance can be determined. What metrics are there for charities?

Idont believe the ceo of a charity needs anywhere near the acumen of (say) the ceo of Tesco’s.

Having said that, if people offer those salaries, you’d have to be a bit dim to say no. Same applies to footballers - what would you have them do, give some salary back?

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10 hours ago, Lloyd90 said:

How much are CEO’s allowed to make before someone becomes offended? 
Someone will always complain as long as it’s more than they make. 

When it comes to charity CEOs , I think they should just take reasonable expenses, not 6 figure sums for simply heading up an organisation.
The charity is there to distribute the funds given by kind hearted people , some of them who are not so well off, not to swell the bank accounts of already well healed execs, who likely already have another exec role.
The people running the charity should donate their time, as the people who pay into donate their money, when it comes to actually physically distributing that charity, then yes the workers whos full time job it is should be paid a fair salary.
A CEO who does precious little , attending the odd meeting , and having nice expenses paid lunch dates with possible larger donors, does not justify the money they get.
There are plenty of good retired CEO or celebs who would freely give their time in the role, and often do, particularly for comic relief.
So why does the hidden boss , cop such a wad of cash ?

Its not about jealousy at all , its about having the confidence, that when you give to charity, that money goes where you think it goes, and not lining the pockets of the already rich.
This isnt justifiable in any argument, and puts many people off giving their money.

If charities were more accountable, and the work done was more visible, more money would be donated.
It doesnt take £200 k a year to work that out either.

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18 minutes ago, Rewulf said:

When it comes to charity CEOs , I think they should just take reasonable expenses, not 6 figure sums for simply heading up an organisation.
The charity is there to distribute the funds given by kind hearted people , some of them who are not so well off, not to swell the bank accounts of already well healed execs, who likely already have another exec role.
The people running the charity should donate their time, as the people who pay into donate their money, when it comes to actually physically distributing that charity, then yes the workers whos full time job it is should be paid a fair salary.
A CEO who does precious little , attending the odd meeting , and having nice expenses paid lunch dates with possible larger donors, does not justify the money they get.
There are plenty of good retired CEO or celebs who would freely give their time in the role, and often do, particularly for comic relief.
So why does the hidden boss , cop such a wad of cash ?

Its not about jealousy at all , its about having the confidence, that when you give to charity, that money goes where you think it goes, and not lining the pockets of the already rich.
This isnt justifiable in any argument, and puts many people off giving their money.

If charities were more accountable, and the work done was more visible, more money would be donated.
It doesnt take £200 k a year to work that out either.


Celebs giving up a single day for a charity isn’t comparable to them taking on a full time role surely? 
 

Quite simply, if it’s that easy to yet someone to work in such a role for free, why aren’t they already doing it? 

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Just now, Lloyd90 said:

Quite simply, if it’s that easy to yet someone to work in such a role for free, why aren’t they already doing it? 

I would think some are , it really depends on the charity ?

All your 'big' multinational charities, Oxfam, Save the children ect, get grants from UN funds, and private donations from big business.
Then put it in investment funds, earn profit, and pay big salaries to often nameless entities, its not what charity was designed to do, and its certainly not what people envisage when they drop their pound into a box.
Dont get me wrong , the money does some good.. eventually , usually involving 'contracts' and more wages, publicity ect.

Lets look at it this way , TV advertising for charities, comic relief , the usual dirty water heart string puller doing the rounds at the moment, where accusing glare from small African boy creates guilty feelings, you know the one ?
Whos paying for the advertising, is it free ?
Have you any idea what a TV advertisement slot costs ? Production ?
Contracts , media , promotion , its not drilling wells in Africa is it ?

They should at least publish the percentage of money actually spent helping the people , against 'admin' on the side of those money boxes, and while were at it, make that information totally transparent, so all can see it .
But they wont do that, as the plebs would stop donating into the racket that many charities are.
 

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Macmillan Cancer Support: 73p charitable activities, 24.4p fundraising, and 2.6p generating income.

Alzheimer’s Research UK: 66.1p charitable activities, 33.9p fundraising, and 0p generating income.

Marie Curie: 63p charitable activities, 27.9p fundraising, and 9.1p generating income.

Cancer Research UK: 60.7p charitable activities, 24p on fundraising, and 15.3p generating income.

Guide Dogs: 56p charitable activities, 40.2p fundraising, and 3.8p generating income.

British Heart Foundation: 26.2p charitable activities, 40.6p fundraising, and 33.2p generating income.

 

A few examples of UK charities.

This is Oxfams annual report for 2018/19 go to page 47 to see what their 'admin' costs are.

https://oi-files-d8-prod.s3.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com/s3fs-public/2019-12/191219_Oxfam_Annual_Report_2018-19.pdf

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7 hours ago, WalkedUp said:

Charity begins with taxation. Too much money is wasted on ridiculous causes (I’m looking at you donkey sanctuaries) and commercial charity businesses (thousands of workers pestering gullible oldies for their last penny or fat cat CEOs, CFOs, COOs etc). 

The charity industry needs strong regulation. For example, before a charity can commence public fundraising it must have a review by an independent commission of the validity of the cause, the alignment to UK policy and an audit of accounts to ensure a minimum of e.g. 85% of revenue is spent on the stated cause. 

I once knew ( via a mate), a guy that opened a donkey sanctuary . He would openly boast that it was the best fiddle he ever had . This was years ago , long before he had any competition. 

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2 hours ago, Rewulf said:

I would think some are , it really depends on the charity ?

All your 'big' multinational charities, Oxfam, Save the children ect, get grants from UN funds, and private donations from big business.
Then put it in investment funds, earn profit, and pay big salaries to often nameless entities, its not what charity was designed to do, and its certainly not what people envisage when they drop their pound into a box.
Dont get me wrong , the money does some good.. eventually , usually involving 'contracts' and more wages, publicity ect.

Lets look at it this way , TV advertising for charities, comic relief , the usual dirty water heart string puller doing the rounds at the moment, where accusing glare from small African boy creates guilty feelings, you know the one ?
Whos paying for the advertising, is it free ?
Have you any idea what a TV advertisement slot costs ? Production ?
Contracts , media , promotion , its not drilling wells in Africa is it ?

They should at least publish the percentage of money actually spent helping the people , against 'admin' on the side of those money boxes, and while were at it, make that information totally transparent, so all can see it .
But they wont do that, as the plebs would stop donating into the racket that many charities are.
 

 

 

I agree with everything you've said. 

 

But the idea that they'll just get a bunch of CEO's to come in and run these companies (Yes companies, not charities) for free is just not going to happen IMO. 

They are big business. 

 

 

Easier just not to give them your money and be stress free :lol: 

 

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45 minutes ago, Lloyd90 said:

They are big business. 

Which is exactly the problem.

46 minutes ago, Lloyd90 said:

Easier just not to give them your money and be stress free :lol: 

I do charity work frequently through my lodge, no one takes wages, some occasionally take expenses, but more often than not it actually costs them money to fund raise, THAT is true charity.
I used to do a lot of charity shoots, again , all prizes donated, no one took a wage, everyone gave their time for free.
Quite often there was a free lunch, occasionally some fuel money , that I put straight back in the pot.
No one who truly feels charitable , wants recognition , or recompense , it makes a mockery of the concept.

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19 minutes ago, Rewulf said:

Which is exactly the problem.

I do charity work frequently through my lodge, no one takes wages, some occasionally take expenses, but more often than not it actually costs them money to fund raise, THAT is true charity.
I used to do a lot of charity shoots, again , all prizes donated, no one took a wage, everyone gave their time for free.
Quite often there was a free lunch, occasionally some fuel money , that I put straight back in the pot.
No one who truly feels charitable , wants recognition , or recompense , it makes a mockery of the concept.

Good post Sir.

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Got to agree with the OP. I appreciate that it is an individual decision - some are happy to donate - others worry about how much of the money goes to people in need.

I am sure many charities started out as worthy causes, but too many have turned into businesses for my liking. Live Aid - made headlines - but where did the money go?

Where money is involved, I trust very, very few people.

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3 hours ago, Rewulf said:

Which is exactly the problem.

I do charity work frequently through my lodge, no one takes wages, some occasionally take expenses, but more often than not it actually costs them money to fund raise, THAT is true charity.
I used to do a lot of charity shoots, again , all prizes donated, no one took a wage, everyone gave their time for free.
Quite often there was a free lunch, occasionally some fuel money , that I put straight back in the pot.
No one who truly feels charitable , wants recognition , or recompense , it makes a mockery of the concept.



Thats nice of you. 
 

Whilst it’s nice that people do stuff like that on a small scale the reach of these big companies raises so much money I bet it does a lot of good. 
 

 

The RNLI has MEGA money in investments. Enough to not need the donations every year. 
 

The money pays them out on the investments and allows them to keep operating securely. 
 

Everyone giving up the odd weekend to go down and do it bit of work around the lifeboat station couldn’t come close to providing the level of service they currently have. 

 

It’s on a completely different level to what you describe. 

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12 hours ago, Lloyd90 said:

The money pays them out on the investments and allows them to keep operating securely

What you're describing isn't a charity though is it? 

Tell me, what does the average lifeboat man earn these days? 

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11 minutes ago, Rewulf said:

What you're describing isn't a charity though is it? 

Tell me, what does the average lifeboat man earn these days? 

Why isn’t it? If a charity has a huge amount of money do they have to spend it all without question? 
 

The RNLI has put money into investment that gives them good returns which allows them to have a secure and steady income. They can then plan long term investment and expenditure, so they can afford to buy properties or equipment or take on staff without thinking “god we hope to earn enough next year to pay the bills”. 
 

 

 

Re pay, my mate was on over £30k a year to train the crew men. 
 

The general volunteers are just that as you know. A role where they are able to give  up their free spare time. Not a 24/7 role. 
 

Any roles that require full time input is (shockingly to some on here) paid a proper wage.  

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On 19/03/2021 at 07:01, WalkedUp said:

Charity begins with taxation. Too much money is wasted on ridiculous causes (I’m looking at you donkey sanctuaries) and commercial charity businesses (thousands of workers pestering gullible oldies for their last penny or fat cat CEOs, CFOs, COOs etc). 

The charity industry needs strong regulation. For example, before a charity can commence public fundraising it must have a review by an independent commission of the validity of the cause, the alignment to UK policy and an audit of accounts to ensure a minimum of e.g. 85% of revenue is spent on the stated cause. 

This.

The larger charities are now nothing more than big business going by a different tax code.

 

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