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I wish it was that easy to removed the lead streaking from the barrels of my Miroku’s, absolute nightmare of a job that takes at least 10-15 mins each barrel. It’s only present when I shoot fibre wads.

I posted on here a few months back asking if anyone had a quick fix, various suggestion, none worked.

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I've been doing this for fifty plus years...just as my father did other than substituting newspaper for the tow he'd have used at 1).

1) Push through both barrels with a rolled ball of newspaper to remove the loose muck.

2)Phosphor bronze Payne-Gallwey type for preference , oiled, until bores are clean, with either Young's .303 or Edna Parker's AC Oil. 

3)A patch (the woven kind that come in the green boxes) to clean out the oil. Turn to its clean side and repeat on second barrel.

4)A new patch (save it after for use next time at process 3) to leave a light film of oil if wanting to leave the bores oiled.

The quick fix for TAILERON and his Miroku is to buy a Payne-Gallwey brush. Or...the reason it was used to "grip" lead fouling gunmakers' tow.

The only thing that we can all be grateful for is modern non-corrosive primers. My gosh it was a faff when primers were corrosive!

Edited by enfieldspares
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1 hour ago, Taileron said:

I wish it was that easy to removed the lead streaking from the barrels of my Miroku’s, absolute nightmare of a job that takes at least 10-15 mins each barrel. It’s only present when I shoot fibre wads.

I posted on here a few months back asking if anyone had a quick fix, various suggestion, none worked.

Hello, having been an avid user of Young's 303 for many years I have now gone over to this, Napier bore solvent, at around a fiver it's worth a try, clean out the crud, a few drops in barrel and scrub with bronze brush, then squares of kitchen roll in the brass Jag until it comes up clean, then a wooly mop sprayed in light gun oil to finish off, 

Edited by oldypigeonpopper
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1 hour ago, enfieldspares said:

I've been doing this for fifty plus years...just as my father did other than substituting newspaper for the tow he'd have used at 1).

1) Push through both barrels with a rolled ball of newspaper to remove the loose muck.

2)Phosphor bronze Payne-Gallwey type for preference , oiled, until bores are clean, with either Young's .303 or Edna Parker's AC Oil. 

3)A patch (the woven kind that come in the green boxes) to clean out the oil. Turn to its clean side and repeat on second barrel.

4)A new patch (save it after for use next time at process 3) to leave a light film of oil if wanting to leave the bores oiled.

The quick fix for TAILERON and his Miroku is to buy a Payne-Gallwey brush. Or...the reason it was used to "grip" lead fouling gunmakers' tow.

The only thing that we can all be grateful for is modern non-corrosive primers. My gosh it was a faff when primers were corrosive!

@Taileron I use more or less this process but with Phillips Gun Barrel Cleaner on my Browning and it comes up clean with minute or so of scrubbing each barrel). I only put fibre wads through it and doesn't seem an issue.

One thing I've found helps generally is a quick pass with a bore snake in the car park when I've finished with some legia spray and that makes it all a bit easier at home. I know they're not everyone's cup of tea and personally I wouldn't solely rely on them, but I've found getting at least some the fouling off while the barrels are still warm(ish) helps and it only takes a minute to do both barrels.

I also use my old standard phosphor bronze brush as the 'jag' for the patch which seems to do good job for the proper cleaning.

@bev6345 - nice video 👍 keep them up

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i used to use very fine cabinate makers wire wool wrapped around an old bronze barrel brush...with a squirt of desiel parrafeen mix.......then couple of jags of kitchenroll...

then a lambs wool brush with some light oil rubbed into it........

then before shooting a jag thro it to push the oil out........

hinge pin ....just a bit of vasiline

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A quick spray with the Philips bore cleaner when still warm gets the process started. You can leave it on to do its work as long as you like. 

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4 hours ago, Taileron said:

I wish it was that easy to removed the lead streaking from the barrels of my Miroku’s, absolute nightmare of a job that takes at least 10-15 mins each barrel. It’s only present when I shoot fibre wads.

I posted on here a few months back asking if anyone had a quick fix, various suggestion, none worked.

Get yourself an old fashioned steel Turks Head brush. Whatever anyone tells you it cannot scratch the bores because only the radius of the wire is in contact  with the barrel. With a squirt of oil it will shift leading in double quick time. I have used them for over half a century and never scratched a bore.

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8 hours ago, Taileron said:

I wish it was that easy to removed the lead streaking from the barrels of my Miroku’s, absolute nightmare of a job that takes at least 10-15 mins each barrel. It’s only present when I shoot fibre wads.

I posted on here a few months back asking if anyone had a quick fix, various suggestion, none worked.

Have you tried Ballistol? It works a treat on getting rid of those plastic wad streaks as well as all other streaks. 

 

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Apart from making sure the bores have a light coating of oil after cleaning with a phosphor bronze brush, can someone tell me why you need to remove all the streaks from the bores?

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37 minutes ago, old'un said:

Apart from making sure the bores have a light coating of oil after cleaning with a phosphor bronze brush, can someone tell me why you need to remove all the streaks from the bores?

To do the job properly. 
Do you only half clean your teeth?

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58 minutes ago, old'un said:

Apart from making sure the bores have a light coating of oil after cleaning with a phosphor bronze brush, can someone tell me why you need to remove all the streaks from the bores?

Personally, its just getting them clean. 🤷‍♂️

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That still does not say why, does the gun shot any better? I clean my barrels with a brush then clean rag, then an oily rag.

if I look up the barrels after the clean rag and see a streak made by the wad or lead I leave it, you can bet your life that after the next outing that streak is in a totally different place, unless you are selling the gun I cannot see the point of spending half an hour trying to get the barrels like a mirror, oily rag is the most important thing.

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5 hours ago, London Best said:

Get yourself an old fashioned steel Turks Head brush. Whatever anyone tells you it cannot scratch the bores because only the radius of the wire is in contact  with the barrel. With a squirt of oil it will shift leading in double quick time. I have used them for over half a century and never scratched a bore.

Correct. Even though they look quite vicious and are if you try to unscrew a tight one off a cleaning rod the wrong way about

1 hour ago, old'un said:

Apart from making sure the bores have a light coating of oil after cleaning with a phosphor bronze brush, can someone tell me why you need to remove all the streaks from the bores?

Back in the day those lead streaks could have salts of mercury fulminate trapped underneath. Or so it was thought. Then when cleaned thoroughly you'd have the delight of revealing pitting you'd allowed to develop under that leading.

My shooting pleasure began way back when this was still a real problem. Cartridges with corrosive primers were on many gunroom shelves for years indeed after the cartridge loaders had switched to non-corrosive primers.

Edited by enfieldspares
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19 minutes ago, enfieldspares said:

Correct. Even though they look quite vicious and are if you try to unscrew a tight one off a cleaning rod the wrong way about

Back in the day those lead streaks could have salts of mercury fulminate trapped underneath. Or so it was thought. Then when cleaned thoroughly you'd have the delight of revealing pitting you'd allowed to develop under that leading.

My shooting pleasure began way back when this was still a real problem. Cartridges with corrosive primers were on many gunroom shelves for years indeed after the cartridge loaders had switched to non-corrosive primers.

Yep, I am well aware of the corrosive nature of cartridges back in the day, perhaps its a throwback to those days of making sure the barrels were spotless and mirror like and well oiled after cleaning.

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I wish I was more like you boys and a little more devoted to my kit. A gun is just a tool to me and so it gets a quick scrub then an oily rag to keep the bores clean and outside rust free but not a display quality finish. 

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I have found that a wait between applying the solvent cleaner (e.g. Youngs 303) and cleaning it out helps giving it time to do its stuff.

Typically, I

  1. get the loose residue out (2 sheets loo paper is my chosen medium through a 12)
  2. Apply Youngs 303 with a Payne Galwey brass brush and a few strokes to distribute it well
  3. Wait about 15 or so minutes or more (time to clean and inspect the action, stock etc.)
  4. Clean out with loo paper as 1 above.
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55 minutes ago, old'un said:

That still does not say why, does the gun shot any better? I clean my barrels with a brush then clean rag, then an oily rag.

if I look up the barrels after the clean rag and see a streak made by the wad or lead I leave it, you can bet your life that after the next outing that streak is in a totally different place, unless you are selling the gun I cannot see the point of spending half an hour trying to get the barrels like a mirror, oily rag is the most important thing.

No, of course it doesn’t shoot any better.
My .22rf has never been cleaned since the day I bought it, but if I was going to clean it I’d clean it.
Same goes for my shotguns, they can stay uncleaned for weeks at a time ( as long as they weren’t wet ) but when I decide to clean them, that’s what I do. 
I don’t spend even half an hour on each one; I’ve just cleaned three this afternoon, two from last Saturday and one from this morning, and all cleaned in less than half an hour. 
I was replying to someone who wanted to get rid of streaks, so I told him that’s what I use. 🤷‍♂️

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7 hours ago, billytheghillie said:

for stubborn marks, wire jag on cordless drill, simples!

Thanks for all the suggestions, further to the last post I made about this issue I tried them all, but have not yet tried Ballistol or a Turks head brush. At the moment I have the brush in the cordless drill, it seems to take an age even after 15-30 mins of Phillips bore cleaner sprayed down the barrels. I have noticed that it’s considerably worse if the barrels get very hot. Today I was shooting lyevale express power blue ( I normally use power red ) it was cold outside and I had hardly any lead fowling, yesterday it was 23 degrees and we were shooting a sim driven day, the barrels were extremely hot and the lead fowling was terrible not a single area that was not covered in it.
 

I only seem to have this problem with my Miroku’s, the other guns don’t seem to suffer with it. I’m wondering if it’s the 18.7 bore is causing it. Plastic wads leave no marking whatsoever but I can only use them on one local ground, 90% of my shooting is fibre.

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10 minutes ago, Taileron said:

Thanks for all the suggestions, further to the last post I made about this issue I tried them all, but have not yet tried Ballistol or a Turks head brush. At the moment I have the brush in the cordless drill, it seems to take an age even after 15-30 mins of Phillips bore cleaner sprayed down the barrels. I have noticed that it’s considerably worse if the barrels get very hot. Today I was shooting lyevale express power blue ( I normally use power red ) it was cold outside and I had hardly any lead fowling, yesterday it was 23 degrees and we were shooting a sim driven day, the barrels were extremely hot and the lead fowling was terrible not a single area that was not covered in it.
 

I only seem to have this problem with my Miroku’s, the other guns don’t seem to suffer with it. I’m wondering if it’s the 18.7 bore is causing it. Plastic wads leave no marking whatsoever but I can only use them on one local ground, 90% of my shooting is fibre.

If it’s an older model it may not have chrome lined barrels? 🤷‍♂️
I get a bit of streaking from plastic wads after shooting steel, but can’t say I’ve noticed heavy lead fouling. 

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