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Escaped bears shot dead.


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Two female Brown bears were ' euthanised' at Whipsnade Zoo yesterday after escaping from their enclosure, during the high winds, a tree fell across the fencing, allowing escape.........sedation was not considered, apparently, due to human safety concerns........info at bbc.co.uk.

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Madness to have a tree that close to the fence line IMO. 

Disaster waiting to happen. 

 

When looking to buy our house we noted several with huge trees very close to the house, and noted that if they fell would cause considerable damage. 

How they could not consider this when making an enclosure for that sort of animal is just negligent. 

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1 minute ago, Lloyd90 said:

Madness to have a tree that close to the fence line IMO. 

Disaster waiting to happen. 

 

When looking to buy our house we noted several with huge trees very close to the house, and noted that if they fell would cause considerable damage. 

How they could not consider this when making an enclosure for that sort of animal is just negligent. 

My thoughts entirely :no:

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Such a loss,we take these animals from they’re habitat that’s suits them,put them in a caged area,that suits us,then when they escaped and do what’s in they're dna,we shoot them stone dead.

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Had to be done, no doubt there are words being said behind closed doors at Whipsnade at the moment. When I lived in Upstate New York several bears were shot by deputies for straying into public areas. Black bears were not considered to be particularly dangerous but you can't take the chance. They raid the trash and can become a pest,

The State encouraged the hunting of them in the fall because they had no natural enemies and they needed to control the numbers. Why would you want to? 

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46 minutes ago, Vince Green said:

 

The State encouraged the hunting of them in the fall because they had no natural enemies and they needed to control the numbers. Why would you want to? 


Many people eat them. 
 

Just like pork apparently. 

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1 hour ago, TONYG said:

Such a loss,we take these animals from they’re habitat that’s suits them,put them in a caged area,that suits us,then when they escaped and do what’s in they're dna,we shoot them stone dead.

My thoughts exactly, it made me quite angry when I heard the story. 

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30 minutes ago, Lloyd90 said:


Many people eat them. 
 

Just like pork apparently. 

I have a friend in Canada who is a professional bear hunter. He says you just do not eat bear, you are likely toe nd up in hospital.

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35 minutes ago, London Best said:

According to ‘her indoors’, the only two things I am not allowed to shoot are bears and zebra.

She may change her mind if treed by a bear?

38 minutes ago, Lloyd90 said:


Many people eat them. 
 

Just like pork apparently. 

More like good steak. Blackbear that is.  I fried the steaks from the backstraps of ours in Newfoundland and they turned out to be delicious.

Yep makes you full aware. My guide in Newfoundland told me that should a sow tell her youngsters that danger was about, the youngsters...150lb of cuddly fuff would be my lap 18ft up a tree stand in seconds. My 7mmRem Mag was always pointing straight down the ladder.

I agree with enclosing wild animals and have never felt happy seeing them in zoos no matter how well they are looked after.  I see the authorities in the USA have just recovered dozens of tigers,tiger crosses and lions from such a place over there because they were not keeping up standards.

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Such a shame, why not tranqualise them? Wrong to shoot them, they're probably institutionalised and would have climbed back in if they became afraid.

I believe that the only thing that can't be eaten on bear is the liver, it's too rich in vitamins for humans. Survival training, 100s of years ago🤔

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37 minutes ago, DUNKS said:

I have a friend in Canada who is a professional bear hunter. He says you just do not eat bear, you are likely toe nd up in hospital.


I believe that’s only if not cooked properly. 
 

Bear is eaten by plenty over there. 

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3 hours ago, TONYG said:

Such a loss,we take these animals from they’re habitat that’s suits them,put them in a caged area,that suits us,then when they escaped and do what’s in they're dna,we shoot them stone dead.

This. 

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1 hour ago, Lloyd90 said:


I believe that’s only if not cooked properly. 
 

Bear is eaten by plenty over there. 

I bow to your superior knowledge. I will let Keith know when we go over next year.

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1 hour ago, DUNKS said:

I bow to your superior knowledge. I will let Keith know when we go over next year.


It’s called Trichinosis, it’s easy to look up and well documented. 

No need to be sarky about it. 

It is very well noted to occur with undercooked Bear meat. It used to be very common in pork but with modern farming practiced is rare. 
 

If you watch the show Meat Eater on Netflix, he hunts bear and openly discussed that he shot and then ate some bear over a campfire thinking it would be fine. 
 

He didn’t cook it to high enough temperature and had Trichinosis, and said he was VERY unwell from the experience. 
 

 

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11 hours ago, scouser said:

Apparently they got into the wild boar enclosure, killed one and damaged another.

Yeah I read that too, but they were shot on human safety issues.

Plenty of Boar down here  in Gloucestershire, in the Forest of Dean, the rangers cannot get on top of the numbers, (no natural predators)...........maybe introduce some Brown Bears 😄.

All the best.

 

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9 hours ago, Lloyd90 said:


It’s called Trichinosis, it’s easy to look up and well documented. 

No need to be sarky about it. 

It is very well noted to occur with undercooked Bear meat. It used to be very common in pork but with modern farming practiced is rare. 
 

If you watch the show Meat Eater on Netflix, he hunts bear and openly discussed that he shot and then ate some bear over a campfire thinking it would be fine. 
 

He didn’t cook it to high enough temperature and had Trichinosis, and said he was VERY unwell from the experience. 
 

 

I've watched many programmes on discovery and national geographic and often see bear being eaten.

As for trichinosis I seem to recall reading a shooting magazine a few years ago and they had an article about shot wild boar having to be tested before entering the food chain. 

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Ah, well. What's done is done?

Sounds like corporate panic to cover up a security design and planning cock up maybe?

It's interesting that they at least maybe experienced some real behavioural enrichment before their demise? 

Tin hat firmly in place as this just ramps up the question of the need for specimens that are not endangered to be in zoos anyway? They are there to increase the number and variety of animals to enhance the viewing public's enjoyment and so keep the coffers topped up from gate money?

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3 minutes ago, old man said:

Ah, well. What's done is done?

Sounds like corporate panic to cover up a security design and planning cock up maybe?

It's interesting that they at least maybe experienced some real behavioural enrichment before their demise? 

Tin hat firmly in place as this just ramps up the question of the need for specimens that are not endangered to be in zoos anyway? They are there to increase the number and variety of animals to enhance the viewing public's enjoyment and so keep the coffers topped up from gate money?


Jurassic park style? 
 

Throw a few live goats into the enclosure for viewing numbers? 

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Whether these animals should have been in captivity is another debate.

Whoever made the call to shoot them must have been working from existing emergency planning and it can not have been an easy decision. Just to play devil's advocate here, suppose you have successfully used tranquilliser "darts", you then have a limited amount of time to recover two very large animals back to a secure site, without causing them injury, before bringing them round. I guess this would entail a canvas sling or straps, a teleporter, etc. Not an easy task to organise with limited staff available at zero notice. When you see this work done on TV (Ol Pejeta for example) they are doing it regularly with a big crew and dedicated transport/handling.

And any failures become hyaena food - off camera.

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