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Best way to strip a lacquered stock


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Looking for some advice on the best way to strip a lacquered gunstock prior to refinishing with oil... I’ve used Nitromoors in the past with mixed results, the modern version isn’t as effective as it used to be! Any advice much appreciated!

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Nitro mors, leave for an hour wipe off most of it. 0000 wire wool rub and rub. 

Repeat until the finish has gone. The stock I'm working on now took 4 cycles. 

And yes the nitro mors now is rubbish to what it used to be. 

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There are paint strippers available which will rip it off but unfortunately not to the general public. Boatyards usually have a licence to buy it.

otherwise as said Nitromores and patience.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Plink all day said:

Looking for some advice on the best way to strip a lacquered gunstock prior to refinishing with oil... I’ve used Nitromoors in the past with mixed results, the modern version isn’t as effective as it used to be! Any advice much appreciated!

I used the dirt cheap screwfix stripper, worked fine on my AYA.

https://www.screwfix.com/p/no-nonsense-paint-varnish-stripper-500ml/17091

 

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Edited by Pangolin
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2 hours ago, Plink all day said:

Looking for some advice on the best way to strip a lacquered gunstock prior to refinishing with oil... I’ve used Nitromoors in the past with mixed results, the modern version isn’t as effective as it used to be! Any advice much appreciated!

Modern Nitromors you'd might as well run the stock under tap water. The old stuff worked a treat though didn't it!

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36 minutes ago, Pangolin said:

used the dirt cheap screwfix stripper, worked fine on my AYA.

Did exactly the same on my BERNADELLI SxS..........tried nitromors first. I would have been better sticking it in the bath with me!A373883C-E52A-42D7-A030-95B199F20A52.jpg.092ee8de8a4195f7c067d19cd7adeb2e.jpgsIMG_0615.JPG.5cd0d636d5776ad032bfca83448c2c40.JPGIMG_0615.JPG.5cd0d636d5776ad032bfca83448c2c40.JPG 

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1 minute ago, Pangolin said:

Nice grain on that.

It was hidden under what can only be described as yacht vanish mixed with toffee apple,covering .  It was RANK

took 4 attempts..then wetting and flatting for days. Finished with slippery "Richards" stain , oil,and wax.....about 15 coats in all

 

IMG_0664.JPG.b88305b4f54a766d76881ce2a29df83a.JPG

Looked like a different gun when I'd finished, I was impressed as it was my first attempt 

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3 hours ago, paulinlincs said:

Nitro mors, leave for an hour wipe off most of it. 0000 wire wool rub and rub. 

Repeat until the finish has gone. The stock I'm working on now took 4 cycles. 

And yes the nitro mors now is rubbish to what it used to be

*This*

I refinished a o/u recently using same and finished with tru oil.

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The trick is to cover the paintstripper on the stock with aluminium or kitchen foil so nothing evaporates from the soltution. This speeds up the proces with any paintstripping solution.

 

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Posted (edited)
On 02/06/2021 at 12:59, Plink all day said:

Looking for some advice on the best way to strip a lacquered gunstock prior to refinishing with oil... I’ve used Nitromoors in the past with mixed results, the modern version isn’t as effective as it used to be! Any advice much appreciated!

Having tried most methods I came down to the opinion and practice of " sanding " and I have done a lot of oil finishes on all manor of guns of all ages from new guns  straight out of the box to 100year old plus .

Stripper  takes all the filler out of the grain leaving it , in some cases , very open and thus needed a lot more work in filling or bodying up before you could get down to actually working on the  finish .

But each to their own . 

Edited by Gunman
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1 hour ago, Gunman said:

Having tried most methods I came down to the opinion and practice of " sanding " and I have done a lot of oil finishes on all manor of guns of all ages from new guns  straight out of the box to 100year old plus .

Stripper  takes all the filler out of the grain leaving it , in some cases , very open and thus needed a lot more work in filling or bodying up before you could get down to actually working on the  finish .

But each to their own . 

I’ve only used chemical strippers before, how do you deal with the chequering when sanding off a lacquer finish? 

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Taking  the lacquer from a gunstock just by sanding is possible but difficult to do in the proper way. You can recognize most sanded and refinished stocks by the rounded edges of the panels and disappearance of other sharp lines. If you decide to sand the finish off a stock, use a solid but somewhat flexibele sanding block and sand the panels with sanding paper wrapped around a file or other strip of metal to keep the edges  sharp. Be sure to check  your progress with the receiver so that the panels don’t end up standing shy to the receiver. Also the sharp edges on the panels should meet the lines on the receiver. Have a close look at your fitted stock before you take it off the receiver and you will see what I mean. Finally wash your stock with turpentine or white spirit.. This shows if you have not left any lacquer on which will show a light spot when oiling the stock.

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14 hours ago, Gunman said:

Having tried most methods I came down to the opinion and practice of " sanding " and I have done a lot of oil finishes on all manor of guns of all ages from new guns  straight out of the box to 100year old plus .

Stripper  takes all the filler out of the grain leaving it , in some cases , very open and thus needed a lot more work in filling or bodying up before you could get down to actually working on the  finish .

But each to their own . 

 This in 90 % of case now I sand away the the lacquer.  

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On 03/06/2021 at 18:45, Plink all day said:

I’ve only used chemical strippers before, how do you deal with the chequering when sanding off a lacquer finish? 

Only sand up to the checkering which should not be lacquered any way but as some many modern stocks have either lazer or pressed checker and are you can id careful use chemicals . On older socks if the checkering needed to be cleansed out then thinners a n a soft wire brush , good quality small bore barrel brush is OK .

If it is a older stock its not a bad idea to cut up the checkering boarders first so you have a more defined line to work to .

 

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On 03/06/2021 at 20:27, Pangolin said:

Sanding will be a lot of work and you can see for my photos and from others that the screwfix stuff works.

With out prejudicing anyone's comments I point out there can  a difference between doing it professionally , as in doing it for others . What you may well be satisfied with having done it your self and what is acceptable in having it done can be quite different.

"Reindeer" makes the comment about rounding off edges , which was something I was always very conscious of and special attention was paid to ensuring all panels were cleaned up as sharply as possible .

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