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Which Battery Jump Starter


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Just had need to borrow an Arteck D29 18,000 MAH Jump Starter to help get through the day as car battery completely flat this morning without any warning and quite impressed with its performance, used 5 times and still showing 95% charge.

any recommendations on any better brands for the money out there before I purchase one of these

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33 minutes ago, dodgy dave said:

i think you should buy a new battery or altanater before that. it looks like   you will be buying one or the other soon any way

100% this

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1 hour ago, dodgy dave said:

i think you should buy a new battery or altanater before that. it looks like   you will be buying one or the other soon any way

Borrowed it to get me through the day, new Varta battery with four year warranty fitted this afternoon, 11 years from new out of this original one so can't complain.

Would be handy to have one of these Jumpers on hand as ironically my works three year old Citan did exactly the same without warning two weeks ago and left me stuck in the morning with it being parked away from house.

Also far more more convenient than running around for jump leads and another vehicle to jump off or lugging batteries around

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Had a couple over the years. Nearly all were useless after a year or so. The only decent one which would still hold a charge was Snap On. I am not a big Snap On fan, as most of their stuff is average, overpriced and with a useless warranty, but their starter packs seem to be class.

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I bought a Sealey version but wish I hadn't, it definitely does not do what it says on the tin. Only tried it on 4 vehicles and it only started one of them, jump leads started the other 3.

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There's a thread in the motoring section.

I tried various differant types as I have a parasitic battery drain.

I have a new battery, heavy duty and alternator charges fines.

Don't waste your money on anything less than the one pictured below.

It cost £200  and starts everything.

I'll be using it today as I've been ill for two weeks and not run my car. Checked battery last night it was 7.5v.

All the other types ended up going back and getting money back.

You need one rated at least two sizes bigger than advertised for your motor.

 

 

20210618_073158.jpg

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As nobody else can seemingly do links:

Unfortunately @Centrepin found the cheap ones are generally rubbish.

Frankly the best solution is to not need them in the first place, that means a battery less than 5 years old and a working alternator, and properly 'lubed battery terminals.  Best tool you can buy is a plug in cigarette lighter voltmeter, that will show you your battery voltage whilst driving; if after a few mins, it's not showing 14.3-14.5 v, investigate further.

If it's not a daily driver car, invest in a trickle charger that you can hardwire in via connector and keep it plugged into that permanently.

11 hours ago, loriusgarrulus said:

but its peace of mind when I am half a mile from the road up a farm track in the wood.

Top tip, if you want to minimise the chances of being stranded off-road beyond the reach of recovery services: Make sure your spare is good, and you carry a block of wood to put under the jack in soft ground.  Most importantly, make sure you have a decent breaker bar to give you leverage undoing wheelnuts and bin off locking wheel nuts.  They're a damn liability, nobody has nicked alloy wheels this century.

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5 minutes ago, udderlyoffroad said:

As nobody else can seemingly do links:

Unfortunately @Centrepin found the cheap ones are generally rubbish.

Frankly the best solution is to not need them in the first place, that means a battery less than 5 years old and a working alternator, and properly 'lubed battery terminals.  Best tool you can buy is a plug in cigarette lighter voltmeter, that will show you your battery voltage whilst driving; if after a few mins, it's not showing 14.3-14.5 v, investigate further.

If it's not a daily driver car, invest in a trickle charger that you can hardwire in via connector and keep it plugged into that permanently.

Top tip, if you want to minimise the chances of being stranded off-road beyond the reach of recovery services: Make sure your spare is good, and you carry a block of wood to put under the jack in soft ground.  Most importantly, make sure you have a decent breaker bar to give you leverage undoing wheelnuts and bin off locking wheel nuts.  They're a damn liability, nobody has nicked alloy wheels this century.

Unfortunatley my days of being able to lug tyres around and change them are gone. Especially the size of wheels and tyres on the Isuzu D Max. 🤷‍♀️

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Fair enough, but you might want to consider keeping said block of wood and breaker bar on board, so a passing strapping lad can assist you should you run over (to pick a random example) a tree cut off just below ground level with a pointy-end...

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5 hours ago, udderlyoffroad said:

As nobody else can seemingly do links:

Unfortunately @Centrepin found the cheap ones are generally rubbish.

Frankly the best solution is to not need them in the first place, that means a battery less than 5 years old and a working alternator, and properly 'lubed battery terminals.  Best tool you can buy is a plug in cigarette lighter voltmeter, that will show you your battery voltage whilst driving; if after a few mins, it's not showing 14.3-14.5 v, investigate further.

If it's not a daily driver car, invest in a trickle charger that you can hardwire in via connector and keep it plugged into that permanently.

Top tip, if you want to minimise the chances of being stranded off-road beyond the reach of recovery services: Make sure your spare is good, and you carry a block of wood to put under the jack in soft ground.  Most importantly, make sure you have a decent breaker bar to give you leverage undoing wheelnuts and bin off locking wheel nuts.  They're a damn liability, nobody has nicked alloy wheels this century.

My battery is/was brand new, now less than 10 months old certainly. It has a 5 year guarantee. The alternator puts out enough voltage to keep it fully charged. Most Range Rovers have some kind of parasitic battery drain due to the amount of electrics things fitted. As unfortunately I'm often poorly and don't drive the car can be stood for as long as it takes to recover. This time 15 days! 

For peace of mind I have the jump pack, it takes seconds to connect, quicker even than jump leads. Now I have a good one, no problem starting. I also have a volt meter fitted just for monitoring. 

I have two bottle jacks, one rated at 4 tonnes one rated at 3 tonnes to make sure of a safe lift. I also have cut down 38mm waffle boards for under the jacks and timber for the tops.  A large breaker bar with ratchet. My problem is strength of lifting the spare into place after jacking. My strength ebbs quickly.

Seriously thinking of another jack, hi-lift farm with accessories for initial lift before placing bottle under.

Off road and on my perm I also carry 50mm waffle boards, a 15 ton recovery strap with 5 ton rated shackles and a spade.

I genuinely can't afford to be stuck no matter where I venture. Although the mark 1 eye ball is the best equipment to save me getting stuck in the first place. 

But.............back on topic..........😁

Buy the absolute best you can afford, in fact buy the one that's just above your price range and rated two engines bigger.

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2 minutes ago, Centrepin said:

unfortunately I'm often poorly and don't drive the car can be stood for as long as it takes to recover. This time 15 days! 

In which case I would strongly urge you to take the time to purchase a trickle charger and wire a connector into the grill, and you could leave it your Rangie plugged in permanently.  Would be better for the life of the battery than this slow drain and jumpstart cycle. 

Even if you didn't have parasitic drains (and I believe me I've fought them on Rangies too), any vehicle used sporadically such as yours would benefit from it.  Wouldn't it be better to know that your vehicle battery was full and ready to go if you needed to use it in a hurry?

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1 minute ago, udderlyoffroad said:

In which case I would strongly urge you to take the time to purchase a trickle charger and wire a connector into the grill, and you could leave it your Rangie plugged in permanently.  Would be better for the life of the battery than this slow drain and jumpstart cycle. 

Even if you didn't have parasitic drains (and I believe me I've fought them on Rangies too), any vehicle used sporadically such as yours would benefit from it.  Wouldn't it be better to know that your vehicle battery was full and ready to go if you needed to use it in a hurry?

I agree of course but I'd have to connect it every day as I never know when and for how long I'm going to be ill.

Might be worth considering though

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